Posts tagged uses

Google Replaces A Site’s URL In Search Results & Uses Its Site Name & Breadcrumb Path

After years of testing, Google has replaced the URL with the site name and breadcrumb trail in the mobile search snippets.

The post Google Replaces A Site’s URL In Search Results & Uses Its Site Name & Breadcrumb Path appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Google Replaces A Site’s URL From The Search Results & Uses Their Site Name & Breadcrumb Path

After years of testing, Google has replaced the URL with the site name and breadcrumb trail in the mobile search snippets.

The post Google Replaces A Site’s URL From The Search Results & Uses Their Site Name & Breadcrumb Path appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Bing Uses “Bubbles” to Simplify Image Search

Bing hopes to reduce errors in mobile image search by encouraging users to #TypeLessSearchFaster with image-based search suggestions and easily altered search bubbles.

View full post on Home – SearchEngineWatch

Hilton Uses Google Hotel Ads to Entice New Customers

Hilton Hotels is using Google’s new ad product, aimed specifically at the hotel industry, to grow conversions by 45 percent and increase ROI by 12 percent.

View full post on Home – SearchEngineWatch

Fledgling App Uses Twitter’s Keyword Search to Win an Audience

Acorns, a brand-new finance app, recently created a hyper-targeted Twitter campaign using keyword search to serve ads to a mobile-first audience.

View full post on Home – SearchEngineWatch

Ad Agency Uses Social Keywords From StatSocial To Target Paid Search, SEO – MediaPost Communications

Ad Agency Uses Social Keywords From StatSocial To Target Paid Search, SEO
MediaPost Communications
An advertising agency in a very large holding company has begun to use social keywords to find and target specific audiences in paid search, as well as optimize search engine content. The agency uses data from StatSocial. Since Google eliminated Web …

View full post on SEO – Google News

The Power of Online Presence: Blogger Dawn Friedman uses her Advanced … – PsychCentral.com

The Power of Online Presence: Blogger Dawn Friedman uses her Advanced
PsychCentral.com
I've worked very hard on my search engine optimization (SEO) and am on the front page for most of the local searches that I've targeted. The second place where I put in effort is on my Facebook page. I have a professional page and a personal account.
How Often Should You Be Blogging?Business 2 Community (blog)

all 2 news articles »

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What Time Is The State Of The Union? White House Uses SEO To Spread The Word

President Barack Obama will deliver his 2015 State of the Union at 6pm PT tonight. If you didn’t know the time, you might turn to Google or Bing for an answer. And there, the White House hopes to inform you through a special post it made to rank for that query. Right now, the State…



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Willy Wonka-Style Elevator Uses Magnets For Trans-Axis Travel


From a world of pure imagination and into reality, a German industrial firm is developing a trans-axis elevator with capabilities akin to those you might remember from fiction (or Hollywood). We’re referring, of course, to the fictional traveling compartment operated by the London-based chocolate magnate from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Like Willy Wonka’s glass version, ThyssenKrupp’s MULTI elevator offers intra-building travel, going up and down as well as sideways.  The only thing missing from the setup is a sociopathic dandy manning the controls and an ability to fly. 

See also: Bluetooth SIG Unveils Better, Stronger, Faster Bluetooth

Assuming a lack of magic and Roald Dahl, what will ThyssenKrupp use to create “the holy grail of the elevator industry”? Magnets, of course. The cables that currently enable elevators to go up and down restrict horizontal travel. Magnetic levitation, the same technology used on some types of monorails, will provide lifting force and stability for this elevator of the future. Even better, there’s no chance the magnets will get tangled. 

Trans-axis mobility isn’t the only expected improvement on the horizontally limited elevators we use today. MULTI should, theoretically, be far more energy efficient. IEEE Spectrum reports:

MULTI will be more energy efficient than traditional cable elevators, and by running multiple cabins moving in a loop at up to 5 m/s, the maglev elevators will be able to carry 50 percent more people while reducing wait times to between 15 and 30 seconds.

The shafts themselves will also be about half the size of elevator shafts that rely on cables, which means more room for developers to put in something useful, like even more elevators.

ThyssenKrupp is installing a MULTI prototype in an 800-foot building going up now in Rottweil, Germany. You can check it out in 2016—golden ticket not required. 

Cover image courtesy of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Warner Bros; story image courtesy ThyssenKrupp

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Facebook Will Change How It Uses People In Experiments


Facebook plans to change the way it conducts research, after its social experiment that manipulated users’ news feeds received an outpouring of criticism.

On Thursday, the company admitted that the way they handled the “emotional contagion” experiment could have been handled differently, and announced a new research framework that includes guidelines, a review policy, training, and a new research website dedicated to the company’s academic research.

In June, Facebook published a paper detailing how it used news feed posts to determine whether positive or negative posts had an effect on users’ moods. Almost 700,000 people unknowingly participated in the study, and when the results were published, Facebook users and members of the academic and scientific communities were outraged.

See also: How To Opt Out Of Facebook’s Mind Altering Experiments

The Electronic Privacy Information Center filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission in the wake of the publicized research, because at the time of the experiments, Facebook did not explain in its data use policy that personal information would be shared with researchers.

Facebook CTO Mike Schroepfer wrote in a blog post that the company didn’t anticipate the negative feedback. One thing Facebook should’ve considered, he wrote, was other non-experimental ways of doing the research, and that it could have benefitted by having more people, and more senior leadership, review the research. 

It’s important to engage with the academic community and publish in peer-reviewed journals, to share technology inventions and because online services such as Facebook can help us understand more about how the world works.

The new framework announced Wednesday includes both internal research and research that might be published for the world to see, though Schroepfer doesn’t describe in detail what the guidelines or the review policy might be.

Research Moving Forward

The company didn’t say anything about getting informed consent from users, one of the major criticisms of the Facebook study. While the company’s data use policy now states that users’ information might be used for research, it didn’t inform any of the 689,003 people in the emotional contagion study that their information would be used to figure out if posts make people happy or sad. And if people continue to agree to the data use policy, which few people even read, it appears that simply using Facebook is enough of a consent for future research. 

See also: Everyone’s A Lab Rat In OkCupid’s Labyrinth Of Love

Although the research had plenty of critics, a handful of people came out in support of the experiments Facebook was running, including dating site OkCupid and venture capitalist and Facebook board of directors member Marc Andreessen

Shortly after Facebook’s research was released, OkCupid published its own study, in which it described the way the company manipulates potential matches in an effort to figure out how people date. Though the splashy claims of experiments were meant to support Facebook, OkCupid’s research was little more than A/B testing.

Companies regularly run experiments on users—it’s how they determine the best products, features and services to provide customers. And although Facebook says it will be more cautious in the future, the fact of the matter is, the only way to avoid being part of Facebook’s social experiments is to quit the site entirely

Lead photo by Dimitris Kalogeropoylos on Flickr

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