Posts tagged used

You Might As Well Get Used To Twitter Messing Around With Your Timeline

If you didn’t like Twitter’s recent move to throw random tweets into your timeline, you’re going to hate the future. Twitter is still struggling to make the service more accessible to the masses, a point underscored by its third-quarter earnings report—and that means more tinkering with things like the timeline Twitter fans have grown accustomed to.

See also: Twitter Is Officially Mucking With Your Timeline

While Twitter continues to grow, particularly on mobile, it’s not growing fast enough to make investors happy. Twitter now has 284 million monthly active users, up 23% compared to the year-earlier quarter. The majority of those—80%—access the social network on mobile. Timeline views reached 181 billion, up 14% compared to a year earlier. 

But the microblogging service’s user growth slowed over its previous quarter, and Wall Street was not impressed. Investors knocked down Twitter shares roughly 10% in after-hours trading.

Growth, Growth, Growth

Twitter otherwise turned in an unexceptional quarter. Its revenues more than doubled to $361.3 million compared to a year earlier. So did its losses, which expanded even faster than revenue, to $174.5 million from $64.6 million a year earlier. Those losses, however, weren’t larger than expected.

Twitter, which wants to position itself as a real-time information and discussion hub, remains small by the standards of major social-media networks. Its 284 million active monthly users are dwarfed by the billion-plus on Facebook, for instance.

In order to appeal to a broader audience—one that isn’t already familiar with the quirky and not completely user-friendly argot of tweeting—the company will have to make it easy to better understand how and why people need to use it. That may well current Twitter addicts who are happy with the way things are.

See also: Twitter Demystified: How To RT, MT, #FF And Fave Like A Pro

The company has made some significant changes in recent months, including dumping suggested tweets into your timeline. These posts might include favorited tweets from people you follow or tweets from accounts your followers follow. It might seem convoluted from that description, but the aim is to help newbies find interesting accounts to follow and, eventually, figure out how people and brands tweet.

Twitter said on Monday that new iOS profiles—a complete revamp of the Twitter profile that makes it easy to navigate by putting tweets, photos and favorites in three separate tabs, and the profile bio clear and up front—accounted for an 83% increase in “profile impressions.” That means people looked at other users’ profiles almost twice as much as they did before.

So What Will Twitter Do?

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo laid out some vague plans for change, some of which echoed what he’s been telling investors for the last few quarters

That includes improving things for new users by providing a “high-quality” timeline when they sign up for an account, likely by suggesting tweets and accounts to follow by forcing tweets in the timeline. That could also include an upgrade to Twitter’s direct messaging function, which has been in a dire need of an upgrade for years.

Costolo said Twitter will continue to “innovate on ways to better organize content to deliver best experiences.” Translated from the original Martian, that means more experimentation and continued shuffling of the timeline.

Anthony Noto, Twitter’s CFO, reiterated those expectations. He said on the third-quarter earnings call that while Twitter will continue to be a real-time social network by showing tweets in chronological order, it will begin to distribute tweets and updates that might be hours hold, but that the user might find helpful. Hello, algorithm-based feed!

The company is also working on improving the number of people that use Twitter that don’t actually have a Twitter account. That includes where tweets appear on third-party services like news websites or in applications. According to Twitter, the “logged out” audience, or people who see tweets outside of Twitter proper, is easily as large as the “logged-in audience”—and perhaps as much as twice that size.

Lead photo courtesy of Twitter

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple Sent Porn To A Developer To Prove His App Could Be Used To Find Porn

Pornographic content is forbidden in the Apple App Store, but Apple seems to be OK with sending porn to developers who submit their apps for review, according to one who received an inappropriate pic. 

“It turns out Apple thought the best way to tell us our app could be used to surf porn was to surf for porn using our app,” Carl Smith, a Florida developer for nGen Works, wrote in a blog post on Medium (NSFW link). 

The email, which Smith shared with ReadWrite, appears to be from the Apple app review team and includes an attached photo of a man’s genitalia, but no warning of the enclosed content. This is the kind of thing that can create a hostile work environment for nGen employees whose jobs necessitate reading emails from Apple. 

See also: The Majority Of Porn In The United States Is Viewed On Smartphones

Smith suggested a number of alternatives he thought Apple could have used to indicate a concern about explicit content. The team could have sent nGen Works a search term to try, or even warn in advance what the emailed photo was of. Instead, Smith said the developers who opened the email had no warning that it would be graphic.

“What I want from Apple is for them to address the issue and put a policy in place that prevents an App store reviewer from sending pornographic images as an example of a issue,” he said. “They could have easily masked out the bad part of the photo or told us a phrase to search. At the very least warn someone before they open the attachments that they aren’t safe for work.”

“Specifically, we noticed your app contains objectionable content at time of review. Please see the attached screenshot/s for more information,” the Apple review team email reads, before offering a downloadable file that turned out to be the genitalia photo in question.

Smith said solution is hypocritical of the company. Of course nGen’s app, which allows users to enlarge, save, and search for Instagram photos, would be capable of browsing any photo that exists on Instagram already.

“This is a double standard,” Smith told ReadWrite. “If I type bad words into Safari I am going to see bad things. So I think Apple needs to address that.”

Smith said he doubted Apple’s “upper echelons” would approve of this action, and encouraged readers to spread the word.

We’ve contacted Apple for a comment on this allegation.

Photo via Shutterstock

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple Now Lets You Check If That Used iPhone Is Stolen

Buying a used iPhone on eBay or Craigslist has become a little less scary now, thanks to a new Apple tool that can help budget shoppers spot stolen devices before they buy.

The iCloud webpage, “Check Activation Lock Status,” does exactly what it says: It checks whether the registered owner has turned on Activation Lock, a Find My iPhone security tool introduced in iOS 7 that requires the registered owner’s Apple ID before it can erase or reactivate an Apple device. Presumably, iPhone owners would shut off this feature before selling to another party.

Stolen Apple gadgets, however, are more likely to have Activation Lock still on. And now, it’s easy to check on that status. 

The Check Activation Lock Status is extremely simple to use: Just go to the page and type in the unique IMEI or serial number used to identify the device. Although it’s available in Settings > General > About on the device, or in iTunes when the iPhone is connected, a shopper may not be able access those areas.

Fortunately, Apple includes that information on the box, which is helpful if you’re transacting in person. If not, at least ask the seller for one or both of the numbers, and perhaps some photographic proof that they’re legitimate. 

Apple’s Activation Lock Status checker

See also: A Thief Snatched My iPhone—And I Learned A Lot About Smartphone Crime

Buyers Beware, And Be Savvy

All iPhones for sale—new or used—should sell with Activation Lock turned off. If it’s on, a new owner would not be able to set up the phone with a new Apple ID.

But, thanks to some hacks that have surfaced, it’s not always that easy to tell the difference.

In May, Apple blog iClarified reported the news of some rough third-party workarounds. One, called doulCi, claimed that it’s intended for legitimate purposes (say, if you forgot your login, or changed your password and can’t remember the new one). The hack involved adding a line to the “hosts” file, a fairly simple procedure that would let you (or anyone else) bypass the activation lock screen. 

It’s not a perfect hack, though. Some folks discovered that it hobbled cellular service. Still, it should have been good enough to fool unwitting buyers. If not, apparently renowned iPhone hacker “iH8sn0w” apparently also found another Activation Lock loophole. 

See also: How To Get Smart About Smartphone Theft

For now, doulCi’s iOS 7 support works for all iPhones prior to the new 6 models, going all the way back to the 3GS, as well as all iPads. The team also has iOS 8 support in the works. 

This is likely what prompted Apple to push the “Check Activation Lock Status” tool out to the public. With this, even if the lock’s busted on the iPhone itself, Apple’s server can still step in and rat out the crook. 

Police photo by Scott Davidson. Screenshots by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite. 

View full post on ReadWrite

SEO 101: Why Headings Should Be Used by @michielheijmans

This post just had to be written. Somehow we have a chapter about Headings in all (!) our site reviews. Usually the website owner can’t change a single thing about the heading setup of the website, as he is unwilling or just lacks the knowledge to change the theme of the website. But headings do matter. There are two ways headings can structure your content. In classic HTML, there would be 1 H1 tag on each page, maybe a couple of H2′s etc and these would all combine to form an outline of the entire document. In HTML5, each sectioning tag (for instance  and ) […]

The post SEO 101: Why Headings Should Be Used by @michielheijmans appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Serious security hole found in SEO plugin used by millions of WordPress users … – Graham Cluley Security News

Serious security hole found in SEO plugin used by millions of WordPress users
Graham Cluley Security News
If so, you need to update the plugin as soon as possible to the latest version. The All in One SEO Pack plugin is a very popular choice for webmasters who wish to boost their WordPress-powered site's position in search engine rankings. Indeed, over 18 …

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5 Tactics We Used To Build Links Last Month

There are a lot of questions around link building tactics these days, especially when it comes to how companies can actually build links that won’t get them in trouble. In fact, one of the most common questions I hear at conferences and from clients is, “How do you build good…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

How One Company Used Promoted Tweets to Heat Up Sales During the Polar Vortex

Chegg, a company focused on connecting college students to resources, has a seasonal business. Here’s how the brand used Twitter’s promoted tweets advertising, the “polar vortex” and free shipping for a slam-dunk back-to-school marketing campaign.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Reports: NSA Used Google Cookies for Data Spying

Just a few days after they ganged up on the government to ask them to curb the NSA’s spying enthusiasm, tech giants are faced with another rather inconvenient truth: that the NSA is actually piggy-backing on Google cookies to gather intelligence.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

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