Posts tagged & Twitter

Twitter Unveils Its New Developer Toolkit—Fabric

Twitter is making its play for developers

At its first-ever Flight developer conference, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo announced a new developer toolkit aimed at helping developers build and make money off applications on the Twitter platform. Called Twitter Fabric, the bundle of services includes Twitter’s Crashlytics application crash detecting service, and MoPub, the ad exchange network.

With the new tools, Twitter officially throws its hat in the ring to compete with Facebook and Google for developers’ time and attention. Its tools are designed to work with Apple’s Xcode and “all major Android IDEs,” meaning that developers can presumably use the Twitter tools within the development environments they’re already used to.

Costolo also lobbed some direct criticism at competitors during his keynote address. “The mobile SDK landscape has been inhabited by parties that optimize for self-interest first, and your interest second,” Costolo said.

He was presumably poking at Facebook, which offers developers the backend-as-a-service Parse, Facebook Login, and the new Facebook Audience Network that displays Facebook ads across different applications.

Google, meanwhile, also just acquired Firebase, a backend service for building realtime apps as part of its cloud services.

Twitter also debuted a new Twitter login feature that will let people log into applications and services with their Twitter credentials instead of creating new username/password IDs for each one. That service essentially matches similar login services from Facebook and Google.

Lead image by Selena Larson for ReadWrite

View full post on ReadWrite

Twitter Introduces Digits, A Password-Free Sign In Solution For Apps and Websites by @mattsouthern

Today at Twitter Flight, the company’s first mobile developer conference, a new sign in service called Digits was introduced. Digits is being touted as a new way for users to sign into apps and websites without the use of a password. With Digits you only need a phone number, which Twitter promises is safe and easy to use. It’s also free for app developers and users. We built Digits after doing extensive research around the world about how people use their smartphones. What we found was that first-time Internet users in places like Jakarta, Mumbai and São Paulo were primarily […]

The post Twitter Introduces Digits, A Password-Free Sign In Solution For Apps and Websites by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Twitter Brings Audio To Your Stream With Soundcloud

Twitter launched a new feature for viewing and listening to audio cards directly inside your Twitter stream Thursday.

Product Manager Richard Slatter wrote that the new feature will be called Twitter Audio Cards, and will allow you to listen to music or audio while you continue to browse Twitter.

“With a single tap, the Twitter Audio Card lets you discover and listen to audio directly in your timeline on both iOS and Android devices,” he wrote on the blog.

Slatter said that while many audio partners will follow, the first company to come to Twitter Audio Cards is Soundcloud, the company Twitter once considered buying. While the catalog obviously includes musicians—like Steve Aoki and deadmau5—users will also be able to listen to audio from @NASA, @WhiteHouse, @ThisAmerLife and more.

See also: Forget Twitter, SoundCloud Is Social Music’s Rising Star

Soundcloud wrote on its blog that while at first it will limit participation in Twitter Audio Cards to select creators, it will soon open the opportunity to everybody.

“And in the coming weeks, we’ll be making the cards available to anyone who posts on SoundCloud,” the company wrote. “Everyone using Twitter on mobile will be able to hear what you’ve shared right there in their timeline.”

Twitter’s announcement was immediately followed by a tweet from the Foo Fighters (audio link), which notes that iTunes is also partnering with Twitter Audio Cards.

Photo via Twitter

View full post on ReadWrite

SearchCap: Google Analytics Tag Manager, Bing Ads Twitter Followers & Google Voice Search

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: Google Analytics Rolls Out New Tag Manager Tools Google analytics rolled out new updates to its Tag Manager today, including new APIs, additional third party…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Bing Ads Showing Twitter Followers In Ads

Bing and Twitter have had a partnership dating back to the ancient days of 2009 and have renewed their deal to feature tweets in the search results every two years since. Now, Bing Ads is testing out an integration to show the number of Twitter followers advertisers have within their ads. The test,…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Twitter Hits Feds With A Lawsuit Over Surveillance Requests

Twitter filed suit against the U.S. government, seeking to overturn restrictions that prevent it from fully reporting on federal surveillance requests.

The social media company said back in February that it would take legal action if the government failed to allow Twitter to be fully transparent with users, and it followed through on that promise by filing a lawsuit to publish the company’s full Transparency Report.

Twitter and other technology companies aren’t allowed to share the exact number of national-security requests for data—national security letters (NSLs) and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court orders—they receive. Even if the number is zero.

See also: Twitter To Feds: Your User-Data Requests Need Way More Sunlight

In January, a group of tech companies including Facebook and Google reached an agreement with the government to share the number of requests for data in broad ranges and without differentiating between NSLs and FISA orders.

At the time, Twitter said it believed that was a step in the right direction, but not enough. 

In the months that followed, Twitter tried to work with the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI to provide a more transparent data request report, but the government didn’t allow the company to publish it, even in redacted form.

“We’ve tried to achieve the level of transparency our users deserve without litigation, but to no avail,” Ben Lee, Twitter’s vice president of legal, wrote in a blog post announcing the lawsuit. 

Twitter argues that the government’s restrictions on publishing such data are unconstitutional. From its lawsuit:

These restrictions constitute an unconstitutional prior restraint and content-based restriction on, and government viewpoint discrimination against, Twitter’s right to speak about information of national and global public concern. Twitter is entitled under the First Amendment to respond to its users’ concerns and to the statements of U.S. government officials by providing more complete information about the limited scope of U.S. government surveillance of Twitter user accounts—including what types of legal process have not been received by Twitter—and the DAG Letter is not a lawful means by which Defendants can seek to enforce their unconstitutional speech restrictions.

Yahoo lost a similar lawsuit when it refused to comply to broad government requests for user data in 2007-2008. The company lost the suit, but recently published a number of previously unreleased documents related to the case.

Lead image by Anthony Quintano

View full post on ReadWrite

Twitter Sues The U.S. Government So It Can Fully Report Surveillance Requests

Twitter filed suit against the U.S. government, seeking to overturn restrictions that prevent it from fully reporting on federal surveillance requests.

The social media company said back in February that it would take legal action if the government failed to allow Twitter to be fully transparent with users, and it followed through on that promise by filing a lawsuit to publish the company’s full Transparency Report.

Twitter and other technology companies aren’t allowed to share the exact number of national-security requests for data—national security letters (NSLs) and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) court orders—they receive. Even if the number is zero.

See also: Twitter To Feds: Your User-Data Requests Need Way More Sunlight

In January, a group of tech companies including Facebook and Google reached an agreement with the government to share the number of requests for data in broad ranges and without differentiating between NSLs and FISA orders.

At the time, Twitter said it believed that was a step in the right direction, but not enough. 

In the months that followed, Twitter tried to work with the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI to provide a more transparent data request report, but the government didn’t allow the company to publish it, even in redacted form.

“We’ve tried to achieve the level of transparency our users deserve without litigation, but to no avail,” Ben Lee, Twitter’s vice president of legal, wrote in a blog post announcing the lawsuit. 

Twitter argues that the government’s restrictions on publishing such data are unconstitutional. From its lawsuit:

These restrictions constitute an unconstitutional prior restraint and content-based restriction on, and government viewpoint discrimination against, Twitter’s right to speak about information of national and global public concern. Twitter is entitled under the First Amendment to respond to its users’ concerns and to the statements of U.S. government officials by providing more complete information about the limited scope of U.S. government surveillance of Twitter user accounts—including what types of legal process have not been received by Twitter—and the DAG Letter is not a lawful means by which Defendants can seek to enforce their unconstitutional speech restrictions.

Yahoo lost a similar lawsuit when it refused to comply to broad government requests for user data in 2007-2008. The company lost the suit, but recently published a number of previously unreleased documents related to the case.

Lead image by Anthony Quintano

View full post on ReadWrite

37 SEO Experts You Should Be Following on Twitter

Here’s a collection of influential tweeters in the SEO world that you should follow in order to stay on top of the latest news, trends, tips, and tricks that will help you succeed in search marketing.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Use Twitter To Build Your Amazon Wishlist By Using This Hashtag by @mattsouthern

This week Twitter took another step towards facilitating consumer purchases through tweets by introducing the #AmazonWishlist hashtag. The new hashtag is integrated with Amazon’s wishlist-making tool, allowing Twitter uses to add items to their list by including that hashtag in a tweet. In order to use the hashtag you must link your Amazon and Twitter accounts together. If you’re not sure how, Amazon will prompt you to do it after going to this link. Once your account are linked then you can start adding items to your wish list. To do that, just reply to tweets that include an Amazon […]

The post Use Twitter To Build Your Amazon Wishlist By Using This Hashtag by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2014, DC2NET All rights reserved