Posts tagged Tool

Google Launches Mobile Friendly Test Tool

Wondering if your site will qualify for Google’s new mobile-friendly labels or be ready for a potential mobile-friendly ranking boost? Google has a new tool to help. The new tool is at google.com/webmasters/tools/mobile-friendly and it basically gives you a pass or fail grade. Either it tells…



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linkbird: An SEO + Content Seeding + Online PR Management Tool … – Search Engine Journal


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linkbird: An SEO + Content Seeding + Online PR Management Tool
Search Engine Journal
This is a sponsored post about linkbird – a SaaS tool which supports online marketers increase online visibility and organic traffic for their brand/company through the symbiosis of SEO, content marketing, and online PR. In today's fiercely competitive

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Google Launches Mobile-Friendly Site Testing Tool by @mattsouthern

Today Google announced the launch of a mobile-friendly test tool to see if your website passes Google’s criteria for what it consider to be a mobile optimized site. In case you’re wondering why it’s important to meet Google’s mobile-friendly criteria, it’s because they’re adding a “mobile-friendly” label in its search results next to sites that pass this criteria. Since this is a brand new addition, there’s no way to know how it will affect click-through rate, but I think it’s a safe bet that mobile searchers are going to visit a page labeled “mobile-friendly” before visiting a page without that […]

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linkbird: An SEO + Content Seeding + Online PR Management Tool [SPONSORED] by @lauraTrueVoice

This is a sponsored post about linkbird – a SaaS tool which supports online marketers increase online visibility and organic traffic for their brand/company through the symbiosis of SEO, content marketing, and online PR. In today’s fiercely competitive SEO and content marketing environment, anything that gives you an edge in online visibility is worth its weight in gold. Historically, the fields of content marketing, SEO, and online PR have been mutually exclusive, however, in the last few years a growing overlap between the three has become necessary. Such a multidisciplinary approach to search engine marketing requires marketers to work together between SEO, […]

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How Majestic’s New Tool Can Help You Find Influencers: An Interview With Dixon Jones by @brentcsutoras

At Pubcon 2014 in Las Vegas I had the opportunity to talk to Dixon Jones of Majestic to discuss their new SEO tools. Majestic has a new feature out called “topical trust flow” that marketers are going to want to know about. In the video below I ask Dixon to explain a little bit about what topical trust flow is and how marketers can use it to their advantage. Here are some key takeaways from the video: With topical trust flow, Majestic has categorized the web. They have figured out a way to take every page on the Internet, and instead […]

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Samsung’s Edge Of Glory: Cool Tool, If You Get A Grip

Samsung may not hang its future on smartphones, but that doesn’t mean it’s totally phoning it in now. Case in point: its new Galaxy Note Edge smartphone with curved glass display. 

See also: Samsung Reveals Its Master Plan To Connect Your Life

There’s no denying that the Edge is a sleek, stunning smartphone. Its beauty comes at a cost, though: a wallet-thumping $400 with a two-year contract, or $700 without contract. The price tops the company’s well-received Galaxy Note 4 by $100 (on contract). That’s a hefty sum for your average smartphone user. Then again, this is not an average phone.

At its core, the Edge is essentially a Galaxy Note 4, but with a twist: a curved display that bends over the phone’s right edge. The bend allows for a thin, secondary screen, which provides extra controls, notifications and other features. 

It’s a thing of beauty. And the ancillary display adds more function too—that is, if you hold it correctly. 

It’s A Beauty … 

Like the Note 4, the Edge features an S-Pen stylus, fast charging, fingerprint scanner, 32GB of memory, microSD card slots, 16 megapixel camera, as well as Samsung’s own stock apps, like S Health, S Note and S Voice. 

See also: Galaxy Note 4 Rolls With An Entourage: VR Headset, Curved Smartphone And Smartwatch

The difference obviously lies in the additional display. Years ago, Samsung experimented with a supplemental screen in the doomed Samsung Continuum. But it appears to have learned a lesson from that flop—mainly, that it’s hard to beat curving glass for sex appeal. 

The Edge’s AMOLED Quad HD technology displays great-looking graphics, and the 5.6-inch size of the main display only shaves a slight bit off the Note 4’s 5.7-inch screen. 

But that’s enough to make room for a bonus display that houses settings, some built-in tools, ticker-style information or a scrollable, customizable list of your favorite apps. You can roll through as many as seven panels. 

The screen also offers some app-specific options. Launch the camera app, and you get camera controls that sit at a comfortable angle, for easy reach. 

Notifications, custom messages and other information can spread out onto that side, so they don’t interfere with whatever app you’re using on the main display. That can include things such as stocks, weather forecasts, Yahoo news headlines, tweets, song info or music controls during playback. You can change the look around, or even slap a teeny Edge-specific game there. 

The device comes with a couple of delightful surprises as well, including a 4-inch ruler on the skinny display, plus a clock perfectly angled to show the time when the device—and you—are in sleep mode.

Samsung intentionally designed the Edge so that a palm resting on that right-hand sliver of screen shouldn’t set off any actions. In my own experience, it worked pretty well. Perhaps once, my palm launched something. Most of the time, the apps and features saved themselves to kick on to intentional finger taps only. 

Then I switched hands. 

… And A Beast

It seems obvious that grabbing an asymmetrical device would pose some challenges. But Samsung adjusted the touch control and designed the screen to flip upside down, so it can work in either hand. 

It’s creative. But make no mistake—it’s not a solution. The topsy-turvy action is a workaround, one that’s not going to work for everyone. 

In my right hand, there were few errant taps. But in left-handed mode, my fingers naturally tended to rest on the inclined glass. Over and over, I set off a cacophony of app launches and other unexpected behaviors. 

A rep stepped in to inform me I was holding it wrong. (Cue Apple joke.) He took the phone from my hand, turned it upside down and handed it back to me, with the home button now at the top. “There,” he said. “This is how you’re supposed to hold it.” In this orientation, with my left palm on the edge, everything worked well again. 

So intentional gripping is apparently key. Too bad I tend to manhandle my phone, often digging it out or pawing at it to answer calls, respond to texts or fire off a quick photo, with whatever hand I have free. I guess that means I’m not exactly the ideal user of this sleek device. 

A Ticker Tape Parade

Even if the Edge is not perfect, at the very least, it’s a refreshing change of pace—one that could get better over time. 

Samsung just released developer tools for the Edge’s ancillary display. With this, app makers may dream up some creative new uses. 

Whether they can overcome the practical reality of grabbing hold of a phone with an angled, touch-enabled edge isn’t quite clear. But based on the number of developers I saw crowding around the gadget at the Samsung Developer Conference this week, it looks like some are very interested in giving this ticker a parade of cool, new uses. 

Photos by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite

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Facebook Quietly Debuts New Local Search and Discovery Tool

The social media platform has made its Places Discovery more useful as a local search and discovery tool.

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Advice Interactive Group Closes First Round of Funding For Local Search Tool by @mattsouthern

Advice Interactive Group provider of Local Site Submit, announced today that it has raised its first round of funding led by Cypress Growth Capital, LLC in conjunction with Silicon Valley Bank. The financing will be used to accelerate the growth of their local search technologies and local business listings management services. Local Site Submit offers a suite of local search tools that help search marketers increase their revenue, and help businesses rank higher in the local search results. CEO Bernadette Coleman explains why this is good news for search marketers: Our goal is to offer the best one stop local […]

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Optmyzr’s New Enhanced Scripts Tool Takes The Programming Out Of AdWords Scripts

AdWords scripts can be incredibly powerful for automating account management and reporting. The kicker for non-developers and even those mildly familiar with Javascript, is that setting up and managing AdWords scripts is often confounding. Even for programming pros, script management can be a time…



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Why Open Source Is Becoming A Big Developer-Recruiting Tool

Most companies are just coming around to the idea that open source can help lower costs and boost innovation within their organizations. But Web companies like Netflix, Twitter and Facebook understand that open source can be more: a powerful weapon for recruiting and retaining top engineering talent.

See also: The Reasons Businesses Use Open Source Are Changing Faster Than You Think

If we believe that developers are the “new kingmakers,” then the companies able to source the best developers will win. That means open source is the new ante for even getting into the developer recruiting game.

You Have Nothing To Lose But Your Chains

For years organizations largely constrained their developer productivity, hemming them in by withholding access to hardware and software. But something has changed in the last few years, which Digital Ocean CEO Ben Uretsky highlights:

[D]evelopers were at the mercy of their employer’s capital. But that’s changed…. With software being free and readily available, the sole ball-and-chain left shackled to the ankles of developers was hardware. With the development of the cloud market, developers had a newfound stray dog freedom.

Fortunately, developers haven’t done “stray dog” sorts of things with that freedom. Instead they’re hard at work within lines of business, building apps often in spite of IT. No wonder Gartner says 38% of technology purchases already happen outside IT, which number will jump to 50% by 2017.

The developer inmates, in other words, increasingly run the enterprise asylum. But how well they run it may hinge on your ability to recruit them.

Open Source Your Recruiting

Which is why I found James Pearce’s presentation at OSCON (transcribed by Remy DeCausemaker) earlier this summer so interesting. Pearce heads Facebook’s open-source efforts, which is a big job given that Facebook could well be the world’s largest open source company. He shared a few data points on Facebook’s open source efforts:

[There are] 200 active projects at Facebook, with 10 million lines of code. Many hundreds of engineers working on these, with over 100,000 followers and 20,000 forks. We contribute to a wide range of projects (i.e. The kernel, mercurial, D, etc). We’ve even open sourced the designs of our data centers and machines in the Open Compute project.

Even this belies just how much open source code Facebook uses and contributes. For every Cassandra (a NoSQL database) that Facebook develops and open sources, it also heavily contributes to an existing project like MySQL. But Facebook also “tries to scale” open-source projects that interest it, and does a lot of fiddling to that effect, as has been the case with MongoDB storage engines

See also: Open Source Projects Need More Than Good Code—They Need Marketing

This culture of open source permeates Facebook. So much so, in fact, that it serves as a beacon to developers who want to work somewhere that unfetters their freedom to tinker, as Pearce notes:

We asked our employees…”Were you aware of the open source software program at Facebook?” Two-thirds said “Yes”, and one-half said that the program positively contributed to their decision to work for us. These are not marginal numbers, and I hope, a trend that continues. A large number of those people said their experience using our projects in the open helped them get ramped up prior to being hired. That is a huge win for our company. This is important part of why open source is valuable to [Facebook].

For Facebook, then, open source is not “naive ideology,” but rather is “like the breeze from an open window; it keeps things from going stale,” both in terms of code and in terms of people.

Set Your Developers Free

Facebook is onto something here, and it’s similar to what Netflix and others have done. Netflix, as I’ve written, “is looking for the best and brightest developers, and knows that the best developers generally want to be involved in open source.”  

Twitter? Chris Aniszczyk, Twitter’s head of open source, lists core operating principles that closely resemble Facebook’s own ethos:

As he told me over Twitter, this isn’t about peace, love and Linux, but about self-interest:

Guess what? It’s in your self-interest, too. The best software today, from Hadoop to Android, is open source. The best developers—those people that will make or break your business—are also focused on open source. 

Set them free. Just like Facebook. Just like Twitter. Just like Netflix.

Lead image by Marcin Wichary

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