Posts tagged STORE

Google Launches “Store Visits” Metric In AdWords, To Help Prove Online-To-Offline Impact

Measures impact of search ads on in-store traffic as part of AdWords Estimated Total Conversions.

The post Google Launches “Store Visits” Metric In AdWords, To Help Prove Online-To-Offline Impact appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

New Google Metric Reveals Which Products Drive Store Visits

Now, with the help of a new metric called “store visit measurement,” advertisers in the U.S. can decide which products to include in their search listings.

View full post on Home – SearchEngineWatch

SearchCap: Google Store Visits, Bing iOS App & AdWords Scripts

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: To Prove Online-To-Offline Impact, Google Rolls Out “Store Visits” Metric In AdWords Measures impact of search ads on in-store traffic as part of…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

To Prove Online-To-Offline Impact, Google Rolls Out “Store Visits” Metric In AdWords

Measures impact of search ads on in-store traffic as part of AdWords Estimated Total Conversions.

The post To Prove Online-To-Offline Impact, Google Rolls Out “Store Visits” Metric In AdWords appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

What Google Has In Store For The Mobile Web

It’s about time Google remembered its roots. For years Google has largely ignored the mobile Web, preferring to focus on native Android app experiences, even as Apple (yes, Apple) has invested heavily in improving HTML5 performance on iOS.

So much so, in fact, that with Apple’s inclusion of WKWebView (a Web browser engine) in iOS 8, app developers will discover dramatic performance improvements in their mobile Web apps. So long as they’re running on Apple, not Android. 

Heck, even Microsoft has surpassed Google. As one developer notes, “with WinRT, you could build fully capable apps that used HTML technologies [with] full access to the system [and the ability to] do anything the .NET/C++ versions could do.”

Based on things Google revealed at its Chrome Developer Summit, however, the Web giant has rediscovered the mobile Web, and in a very big way. 

Google Falls In Love With The Web … Again

In case you weren’t able to attend the Chrome Developer Summit, Google has (of course) posted the proceedings on YouTube. To save time, however, Divshot CEO Michael Bleigh has captured the essentials in an excellent summary. Google, like Apple, is investing heavily in improving the performance of mobile Web apps, as well as functional capabilities. 

Specifically, Bleigh summarizes,

Google is doing everything it can to get mobile web to 60fps, which gives you about 16ms per frame to do everything you need to do. It’s hard to even enumerate all the different ways they’re working on this. From speeding up paint to putting more workload into the GPU to providing flame charts (so cool!) in DevTools so you can figure out what causes that jank.

Beyond performance, however, which Apple is also hell-bent on improving, Google also is aggressively advancing the state of the mobile Web art. Things like app manifest (describes your app to Chrome – what it is and how to launch it) are promising, but the big news at Summit was ServiceWorker, which Bleigh describes as “seriously, majorly awesome.”

See also: Google Working On Versions Of Its Services For Kids

Why? Well, because it “gives you the power to program the network layer of the browser,” and thereby “can completely solve the offline problem.” 

Offline is a big deal, it’s one of the most defining features of native apps vs. web in today’s climate. As Alex Russell put it in his talk: “It isn’t an app if it doesn’t run when you tap.” Once ServiceWorker lands [around the end of 2014], it’s only a short time later that we’ll see Push Notifications in the browser (they use ServiceWorker to coordinate). This will mean that, with a simple permission opt-in, a website will be able to notify you days, weeks, or months after you visit it. With the growing importance (and interactive nature) of notifications on mobile platforms, it’ll be great to see the web get to participate.

In other words, Google is about to bring the Web back to parity with native. In some ways, actually, it’s making the Web better than native, because the Web doesn’t have the same problem with app distribution that app stores have. As Google makes the Web a first-class citizen on mobile, there will be less cause to worry about Apple and Google duopolizing our newly mobile world.

Why Web? Why Now?

But why has it taken so long for Google to come to this point? After all, it’s not hard to reason why the Web should be a big deal for Google. The company was born on the Web, and makes roughly $6.30 per Internet user per year, as Asymco analysis suggests:

Credit: Asymco

The more people that get access to the Internet, the more Google makes. While mobile revenue per user may not (yet) be as high as it is on the desktop Web, and Google may not monetize evenly across different demographics, the fact remains: the Internet is a massive piggybank for Google.

Which explains why Google has been so insistent on pushing more people online through Android adoption. It doesn’t, however, adequately explain its shunting aside of the mobile Web.

EmberJS’ Tom Dale first highlighted the conflict Google has faced between Android and Web in an interview with ReadWrite:

Google is a strong advocate for HTML5, or at least particular teams within Google are. But the Google of 2014 is an adolescent behemoth, with accompanying growing pains and identity crises. It’s not surprising the signals out of it have been so mixed. My theory is that there was an internal battle inside Google: Fight against Apple on its own turf, with an app store and a proprietary SDK, or go all in on the Web?

But then speculates that the shift back to the Web may come down to Android founder Andy Rubin leaving the company:

With Andy Rubin out and Sundar Pichai taking over both Chrome and Android, I think it’s obvious wiser heads have prevailed. Expect to see a much tighter integration of Chrome (and, therefore, Web technologies) into Android over the coming years. Google’s only significant source of revenue continues to be search ads; anything that drives users away from the Web as the starting point of every interaction is the wrong decision, in my opinion. All indications are that, after some political battles, the executives at Google have realized the same thing. 

Web First?

Whatever the reason, and whatever the timing, it’s great to have Google back investing on its home turf. 

Ultimately, Google’s actions should help us to stop thinking about the false binary, native or Web? The reality, as Forrester explains, is that both are needed, albeit for different things. With Google’s help, we should see Forrester’s prognosis come to fruition sooner than expected:

Native apps were everywhere in the early client server days, but web apps took over in the later stages during the PC era. These web apps were simpler to install and easier to maintain and secure, and their cross-platform porting costs were lower. We think history will…repeat itself in the mobile space [over the next five years], especially for glanceable apps, where users quickly consume information and then proceed with other tasks.

More Web, then, is good for us. It’s also really, really good for Google.

View full post on ReadWrite

Google Brings The Play Store To China, Kinda Sorta

Google is finally letting Chinese app developers use the Google Play store to upload and make their apps available to customers. But there’s a big catch: the Android app for Google Play itself isn’t available in China, so developers can’t actually distribute these apps to mainland Chinese users.

Chinese users have adopted Google in a big way, making up more than half of the one billion Android users around the globe. However, Google hasn’t been available in China since 2010, when it shut down Google.cn amid hacking allegations against the Chinese government.

See also: Google Apps in China: It May Work, It May Not

Under the new Google Play support, Chinese developers will be able to distribute paid and free apps to Android users in 130 countries—just not China. Chinese users will continue to need to use third-party app stores such as Qihoo 360 in order to access apps made by both their fellow Chinese and other developers.

However, it could be that Google is also testing the waters for an app store in China. According to a Wednesday report in the Information, sources close to the company believe Google plans to launch a version of its Google Play store for Chinese consumers.

It’s hard to know if Google’s return to China will be a triumphant one or too little too late. By this point, Chinese Android users have been using third-party app stores for the better part of four years, and may prefer them to whatever Google can offer.

Lead image by Anita Hart

View full post on ReadWrite

Amazon Reportedly Hitting The Bricks With A Store In New York

Amazon.com, king of e-commerce, can’t seem to leave the physical realm alone—first e-readers, then tablets, TV boxes and smartphones. Now, Jeff Bezos wants a genuine brick-and-mortar shop to peddle them all, say the Wall Street Journal

Citing people familiar with the plans, the paper reported that the online retailer has its sights set on a New York City store, smack dab in the middle of a high-traffic Manhattan shopping district. If true, the new establishment would go up at 7 West 34th Street—just in time for the upcoming holiday shopping season. 

A first for the tech giant, an Amazon store would give consumers some hands-on time with products. And, because the company is an expert at delivering the goods, the store may also front a warehouse of sorts.

From this site, Amazon would be able to send out same-day deliveries within the city, and let people pick up or return items they’ve ordered from the Internet.  

Amazon has quietly offered same-day delivery in New York and other cities for years. But a physical store would give Amazon an on-the-ground presence—a key advantage that Apple has when selling gadgets. 

Photo of 7 West 34th Street via Google Maps Street View

Update: In response to the Journal’s report, Amazon has said it hasn’t announced any plans for a store in Manhattan. 

View full post on ReadWrite

Amazon Set To Hit The Bricks With A Store In New York

Amazon.com, king of e-commerce, can’t seem to leave the physical realm alone—first e-readers, then tablets, TV boxes and smartphones. Now, Jeff Bezos wants a genuine brick-and-mortar shop to peddle them all.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the online retailer has its sights set on a New York City store, smack dab in the middle of a high-traffic Manhattan shopping district. Reportedly, the new establishment should go up at 7 West 34th Street—just in time for the upcoming holiday shopping season. (In response to the Journal’s report, Amazon has said it hasn’t announced any plans for a store in Manhattan.)

A first for the tech giant, an Amazon store would give consumers some hands-on time with products. And, because the company is an expert at delivering the goods, the store could also front a warehouse of sorts.

From the store, Amazon could also send out same-day deliveries within the city, and let people pick up or even return items they’ve ordered from the Internet.  

Amazon has quietly offered same-day delivery in New York and other cities for years. But a physical store would give Amazon an on-the-ground presence—a key advantage that Apple has when selling gadgets.

Photo of 7 West 34th Street via Google Maps Street View

View full post on ReadWrite

Why You Can’t Download Health And Fitness Apps From Apple’s App Store

An unannounced fitness tracker

Fitness-app developers who expected a lift from Apple’s release of iOS 8 and its new health-related features got a nasty surprise Wednesday.

Apple held up new apps that used its HealthKit software to store and present health-related data. And, it turns out, Apple completely removed existing apps which had added HealthKit from the App Store.

MyFitnessPal, a nutrition tracker with 50 million users, was one of the biggest apps affected, as were apps from major brands like WebMD and Walgreens.

“Our app which supported HealthKit integration was removed from the App Store this morning,” MyFitnessPal CEO Mike Lee told me in an email. “We’ve been working with Apple on a solution, and a version without HealthKit should be available shortly.”

Lee said Apple approved a new version of MyFitnessPal without HealthKit shortly after the company submitted it.

As of Monday afternoon, MyFitnessPal was not yet back in the App Store, but Lee said he expected it to return quickly.

That’s the good news for developers.

The bad news, according to Apple, is that the bug that required HealthKit apps’ removal will not be fixed until the end of September.

That’s a blow for startups like Big Health, which had pegged the release of its Sleepio sleep-therapy app to the availability of HealthKit. Sleepio doesn’t do its own sleep-tracking: Instead, it relies on HealthKit-connected fitness trackers or manual input of sleep data in Apple’s Health app, which also uses HealthKit to transfer data.

View full post on ReadWrite

iTunes App Store SEO: Getting your game recognized via search-engine … – VentureBeat


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iTunes App Store SEO: Getting your game recognized via search-engine
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In spite of all the varying pontifications of experts in the SEO field, most agree that your game's keywords still matter. SEO specialists usually state that when it comes to getting recognition for your website or game, you're generally going to want

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