Posts tagged service.

UK SEO consultant Red Lion Design unveils a new custom SEO service to get … – Virtual-Strategy Magazine (press release)

UK SEO consultant Red Lion Design unveils a new custom SEO service to get
Virtual-Strategy Magazine (press release)
One of the leading SEO firms in the UK Red Lion Design has unveiled a new custom SEO service that the provider says is geared towards getting local business in Cardiff on Google page one in just 12 weeks. According to a statement released by the top …

and more »

View full post on SEO – Google News

Q&A: Bathrooms.com on SEO, PR, and online customer service – Econsultancy (blog)

Q&A: Bathrooms.com on SEO, PR, and online customer service
Econsultancy (blog)
Bathrooms.com relaunched its site last year, and also began a more PR-focused approach to SEO, after receiving a penalty or two from Google. Now, a year or so later, this approach seems to be working. I've been asking Adam Cassar, digital marketing …

View full post on SEO – Google News

Social Customer Service Secrets to Avoid Negative Search Results

Maintaining an effective strategy for customer service on social media will help to ensure that your brand doesn’t accrue any negative search results.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

How to Select a Lucrative SEO Service Provider for Constant Business Growth – Tech Cocktail

How to Select a Lucrative SEO Service Provider for Constant Business Growth
Tech Cocktail
Search Engine Optimization (SEO), has become a vital component in the process of deciding the ranking system of a website. For a company's overall web marketing strategy, SEO has become crucial these days. Websites that do not take help of SEO …
SEO vs. SEM or both?Inquirer.net
Jacksonville Social Media Agency MVMG Introduces New Online Marketing IT Business Net
Convert website visitors to paying customersCasper Journal

all 6 news articles »

View full post on SEO – Google News

Why YouTube Music Key Is A Streaming Service That Might Actually Work

After much hype over YouTube’s rumored music service and delays in its launch, big changes are finally coming to the video site and Google Play Music All Access.

On Monday, Android Police reported that Google-owned YouTube is launching YouTube Music Key, a paid streaming music service that will offer ad-free, audio-only and offline playback for $9.99 per month. What’s more, Google Play All Access will be rebranded as Google Play Music Key. YouTube may actually have a winner on its hands with this new service if it stays close to its video streaming roots.

Google has already added 20 million tracks and complete albums to Youtube Music Key, and has also acquired the domain YouTubeMusicKey.com.

In addition, YouTube’s new streaming site will offer concert footage, remixes, and cover songs. This may be the key to making the service take off. Music is a huge and integral part of YouTube’s ecosystem, a place where video streaming fans can access and discover music videos, concert clips, radio performances, fan covers, and more.

YouTube has long been instrumental in music discovery. In 2013, Billboard included the number of YouTube plays into determining its Hot 100 Singles Chart. Many YouTube users, like myself, use the video site to play songs through a single video or a playlist. I’ll use YouTube not only to watch Sam Smith’s music video, but also to see a video of him singing the same song live, or to watch a fan-made cover of the song. 

YouTube is making a smart move by replicating the accessibility and range of its video site on YouTube Music Key. Fans who flock to YouTube to see the full range of possibility for a song or artist will be able to do the same with the paid streaming service.  

One question remains: Will users fork over the $9.99 per month for this YouTube-curated streaming service, or will they continue to go the free route on the already established video streaming site? We’ll have to wait and see. Google has not commented on when YouTube Music Key is set to launch.

Images courtesy of Android Police, lead image of Sam Smith by Flickr user wfuv 

View full post on ReadWrite

Bing Mobile Domain Returns Service Unavailable 503 Error

If you try to access Bing Mobile at m.bing.com, you will be presented with an error message. The error will read: The page you want isn’t available We’re working to restore service as soon as possible. The server error code also returns a major error, specifically a 503 error code which…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Page SEO Company Announces Free Website Analysis Service – PR.com (press release)

Page SEO Company Announces Free Website Analysis Service
PR.com (press release)
The service, valued at $200, allows website owners to get their website analyzed for SEO errors, technology errors, usability, visitor information and more. Also known as an SEO audit, this service ultimately helps identify what is wrong with a website

and more »

View full post on SEO – Google News

Boostability Named Second Best Local SEO Service by topseos.com for July 2014 – DigitalJournal.com

Boostability Named Second Best Local SEO Service by topseos.com for July 2014
DigitalJournal.com
topseos.com has announced the rankings of the 100 best local search engine optimization agencies for July 2014. Boostability has been named the second best company due to their impressive performance during the topseos.com meticulous evaluation …
Local SEO Agencies Help Local Businesses, and 10 Best SEO Has Awarded the Virtual-Strategy Magazine (press release)
Top Enterprise SEO Agencies Announced by 10 Best SEOPR Web (press release)

all 15 news articles »

View full post on SEO – Google News

Why You Should Get Mad About AOL’s New Terms Of Service

AOL is making some changes to its terms of service, the legal documents that Internet users almost never read yet that bind them with restrictive agreements.

On September 15, AOL is implementing new terms of service, which include an arbitration clause which allows AOL to avoid class action lawsuits.

AOL is also giving itself the right to call users with automated, prerecorded messages:

When you sign up for Services and provide us with your telephone number or mobile phone number, you agree that we may contact you from time-to-time about the Services.YOU GIVE US CONSENT TO USE AUTODIALED AND PRERECORDED MESSAGES TO CONTACT YOU AT THE NUMBER YOU PROVIDE TO US.We may use the phone number that you provide to us when you open your account, when you add a telephone number to your account information, when you provide it to one of our employees or customer support, or by contacting us from your number. If you provide us with a mobile number, you consent to receive SMS or text messages at that number. You may stop further text messaging by simply texting “STOP” per the instructions we provide to you. Standard telephone minute and text charges may apply if we contact you.We will not share your phone number with non-affiliated third parties for their purposes without your consent, but we may share your phone number with our service providers, such as billing or collection companies, who may contact you using auto-dialed or prerecorded message calls or text messages. 

Chances are the majority of people who use AOL aren’t planning on suing them, so they’ll likely shrug off the new arbitration clause. But the idea that AOL will be robocalling anyone who uses its services is likely to rile people up.

See Also: LinkedIn’s Latest Lawsuit Is A Great Reminder Of How We Give Up Our Own Privacy

AOL may argue that it wants to place automated calls for billing inquiries, but the terms as written actually allow AOL to call you for any reason, including trying to sell you on new products and services.

The other troubling thing about the changed terms of service is that AOL, unlike other companies trying to push through arbitration clauses, isn’t allowing users to opt out of arbitration. Using its services equals consent to the new terms, according to AOL.

Online file-storage company Dropbox included an arbitration clause in its terms of service updated in February of this year, but it allowed users to opt out of the arbitration clause up to 30 days after agreeing to the new terms.

It’s especially alarming that AOL is trying to bypass class-action lawsuits, given its history. AOL settled a class-action lawsuit for violating users’ privacy by releasing search data last year. It’s also faced lawsuits over billing practices and ads inserted into email footers.

Class-action lawsuits are the main way consumers can get recompense for relatively small harms done to a large number of people, like privacy violations or billing errors. Some legal advocates think the arbitration process inherently favors companies.

AOL’s new terms offer no such option.

The company did not immediately respond to an inquiry about its new terms.

Image via Renato Ganoza on Flickr

View full post on ReadWrite

AOL’s New Terms Of Service Are Pretty Awful

AOL is making some changes to its terms of service, the legal documents that Internet users almost never read yet that bind them with restrictive agreements.

On September 15, AOL is implementing new terms of service, which include an arbitration clause which allows AOL to avoid class action lawsuits.

AOL is also giving itself the right to call users with automated, prerecorded messages:

When you sign up for Services and provide us with your telephone number or mobile phone number, you agree that we may contact you from time-to-time about the Services.YOU GIVE US CONSENT TO USE AUTODIALED AND PRERECORDED MESSAGES TO CONTACT YOU AT THE NUMBER YOU PROVIDE TO US.We may use the phone number that you provide to us when you open your account, when you add a telephone number to your account information, when you provide it to one of our employees or customer support, or by contacting us from your number. If you provide us with a mobile number, you consent to receive SMS or text messages at that number. You may stop further text messaging by simply texting “STOP” per the instructions we provide to you. Standard telephone minute and text charges may apply if we contact you.We will not share your phone number with non-affiliated third parties for their purposes without your consent, but we may share your phone number with our service providers, such as billing or collection companies, who may contact you using auto-dialed or prerecorded message calls or text messages. 

Chances are the majority of people who use AOL aren’t planning on suing them, so they’ll likely shrug off the new arbitration clause. But the idea that AOL will be robocalling anyone who uses its services is likely to rile people up.

See Also: LinkedIn’s Latest Lawsuit Is A Great Reminder Of How We Give Up Our Own Privacy

AOL may argue that it wants to place automated calls for billing inquiries, but the terms as written actually allow AOL to call you for any reason, including trying to sell you on new products and services.

The other troubling thing about the changed terms of service is that AOL, unlike other companies trying to push through arbitration clauses, isn’t allowing users to opt out of arbitration. Using its services equals consent to the new terms, according to AOL.

Online file-storage company Dropbox included an arbitration clause in its terms of service updated in February of this year, but it allowed users to opt out of the arbitration clause up to 30 days after agreeing to the new terms.

It’s especially alarming that AOL is trying to bypass class-action lawsuits, given its history. AOL settled a class-action lawsuit for violating users’ privacy by releasing search data last year. It’s also faced lawsuits over billing practices and ads inserted into email footers.

Class-action lawsuits are the main way consumers can get recompense for relatively small harms done to a large number of people, like privacy violations or billing errors. Some legal advocates think the arbitration process inherently favors companies.

AOL’s new terms offer no such option.

The company did not immediately respond to an inquiry about its new terms.

Image via Renato Ganoza on Flickr

View full post on ReadWrite

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