Posts tagged Sell

Why Facebook For Work Will Be A Hard Sell To Employers

If your office blocks Internet access to Facebook, odds are it doesn’t block LinkedIn, too. Facebook thinks that’s no fair. Now, the social network is building “Facebook at Work,” a version of its site for the workplace.

According to the Financial Times, the site will look like Facebook proper, but allow employees to keep their work life separate. Users will be able to chat with coworkers, collaborate on projects, and build catalogues of colleague’s contacts, with each of these services directly competing with Microsoft’s Yammer, Google’s Drive, and LinkedIn.

A work-friendly Facebook makes sense for the social network so that it can grasp even more of users’ time. CEO Mark Zuckerberg noted in July that American users spend an average of 40 minutes per day on the site. This could be compounded during work hours.

However, Facebook has several hurdles ahead of convincing companies to unblock a new work-friendly version of Facebook. First, there’s employers’ beliefs that Facebook is a waste of time. A 2009 survey found that more than half of employers had Facebook blocked. There’s also Facebook’s dismal privacy record. Will companies really want their employees storing sensitive work information in the same cloud that ignores “do not track” browser settings?

See also: Facebook Is Going To Start Tracking You Even More Closely

Finally, and most damningly, is the fact that all the services Facebook at Work will offer already exist. Slack, Google Drive, and LinkedIn already do these features well, and have the market for these respective services cornered. If Facebook at Work is going to have a chance of competing, it’ll need to extremely improve on its competitors’ services. And from the little we’ve seen of the service (with Facebook declining to comment), it’s hard to tell if Facebook for Work even has a chance. 

Screengrab by Facebook

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Facebook’s Latest “You Are The Product” Message: We Will, We Will, Sell You

Facebook’s latest iteration of its privacy policy is both the shortest and clearest so far about what it means to do with your personal information: Squeeze it for all the money it’s worth. 

Your privacy settings won’t be changing, the social network explained Thursday in a blog post. But its rules for using your location and payment information (when that service is added) are getting an update to accommodate its expanding empire.

To augment—if not distract from—this reminder that it owns its users, Facebook simplified its privacy settings with color-coding and a “Privacy Basics” tutorial.  

From the Facebook blog post:

We’re updating our policies to explain how we get location information depending on the features you decide to use. Millions of people check into their favorite places and use optional features like Nearby Friends. We’re working on ways to show you the most relevant information based on where you are and what your friends are up to. For example, in the future, if you decide to share where you are, you might see menus from restaurants nearby or updates from friends in the area.

While couched in the language of “friends,” this is actually about targeted advertising. If Facebook knows exactly where you are, it know, it knows exactly which advertisements for local establishments to show you. 

See also: Mark Zuckerberg’s Mythic T-Shirt And Fake Silicon Valley Do-Goodery

Soon too, Facebook will be able to help you spend that money by tapping into your wallet with those targeted ads:

In some regions, we’re testing a Buy button that helps people discover and purchase products without leaving Facebook. We’re also working on new ways to make transactions even more convenient and secure.

Facebook’s new data policy is where you’ll find the explanation on the information collected when you buy something through the social network. This includes:

… your credit or debit card number and other card information, and other account and authentication information, as well as billing, shipping and contact details.

And more targeted advertising ensues. 

In keeping with Facebook’s 2011 settlement with the Federal Communications Commission, in which the social network agreed to give everyone a heads up on privacy changes, you’ve got seven days to comment on these changes. 

Lead image by mwichary

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How To Sell Your Website: An Interview With Mark Daoust by @johnrampton

At Pubcon 2014 in Las Vegas, I was able to sit down and talk to Mark Daoust, CEO and Founder of Quiet Light Brokerage, about selling an online business. Mark’s company helps businesses sell their websites online, so he has seen what works and what doesn’t. In the video below, I ask Mark to go over some of the common problems he sees people running into when trying to sell their website online. Here are some key takeaways from the video: The most common problem Mark sees is that people aren’t really prepared. When it comes to selling an online […]

The post How To Sell Your Website: An Interview With Mark Daoust by @johnrampton appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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How Can SEOs Sell “Shiny, Sexy” Search?

In a panel discussion at ad:tech New York, Kevin Ryan of Motivity Marketing, Shreya Kushari of Digitas, and Hamid Saify of Deutsch discussed the best practices for getting reluctant clients to realize the power of search.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Tickets for Seo Taiji’s concert ‘Christmaslowin’ sell out within 20 minutes – allkpop


allkpop
Tickets for Seo Taiji's concert 'Christmaslowin' sell out within 20 minutes
allkpop
In addition to performing his new songs from his 9th album, Seo Taiji is planning on performing classic Seo Taiji songs such as "Hayoga", "COME BACK HOME", "Class Ideals", and "To You", to celebrate his 22nd anniversary since his debut. To make the …

View full post on SEO – Google News

Latest Rumor: Twitch Will Sell To Amazon, Not Google

[Update: Amazon has officially acquired Twitch for $970 million in cash.]

Twitch, the popular video-game livestreaming site, may have spurned a reported $1 billion acquisition offer from Google in favor of a richer proposal from Amazon.

The Wall Street Journal and The Information have both reported that Amazon is nearing a deal to acquire Twitch for more than $1 billion, and that the companies could announce the agreement as soon as today.

Previous reports that Google was acquiring Twitch were fueled by the company’s previous moves in the online video space, particularly its purchase of video streaming site YouTube in 2006. With YouTube’s strong ties to the gaming community, many believed a future partnership with Twitch was highly plausible.

Twitch was introduced by livestreaming site Justin.tv in 2011. Earlier this year, Justin.tv rebranded itself as Twitch due to the success of the video-game network. 

Images courtesy of The World According To Marty, Ducksauce on Twitch.tv

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Shoes On The Run: Why Your Fitness App Wants To Sell You Stuff

ReadWriteBody is an ongoing series in which ReadWrite covers networked fitness and the quantified self.

My Nike+ Running app is free, like most of the running apps I’ve tried. So how does Nike make money off of it?

It’s all in the shoes. Nike’s app asked me which shoes I run with, and when I’ve logged enough miles to run my soles into the ground, it gently suggests I get myself down to Niketown to replace them.

MapMyFitness, another big running-app maker, has now copied Nike’s moves with a new feature called Gear Tracker that it unveiled Thursday. You can now track the mileage you’ve logged on a particular set of kicks, and get reminders to replace them. MapMyFitness has partnered with Zappos.com, the Amazon.com-owned apparel store, to sell shoes.

If The Shoe Doesn’t Fit

This isn’t a shoe-selling gimmick, by the way: Runner’s World recommends replacing running shoes after 300 to 500 miles, something I didn’t realize as a novice runner. I found Nike’s nudge helpful rather than annoying.

And MapMyFitness isn’t doing this for the money—at least not the easy kind. While Zappos has a program to share a percentage of revenues with sites and apps that direct customers to it, MapMyFitness spokesperson Allison Glass tells me her company isn’t participating and that Zappos is keeping all the revenue.

A few years ago, most of the big running apps introduced premium subscription options, offering more advanced run-tracking features like live run broadcasts or more detailed analysis for a monthly or annual fee. Strava has done particularly well with its subscription offering, and MapMyFitness, RunKeeper, and Runtastic all have them as well.

Selling Fitness

But selling gear may be the real secret to making money in fitness. MapMyFitness and Runtastic have the most advanced strategies here.

MapMyFitness’s success at pushing fitness apparel and hardware is a big reason why Under Armour paid $150 million to buy the Austin, Texas-based company last year. Shortly before Under Armour announced the deal, MapMyFitness had struck a partnership with Brooks Running.

Under Armour is making a big move to sell more than just athletic clothing, including wearables like its Armour39 activity tracker and shoes, a market where it hopes to go toe to toe with Nike

Unlike Nike+, MapMyFitness’s Gear Tracker will track any kind of shoe—which is a sensible strategy for an upstart like Under Armour. Gear Tracker’s openness mirrors MapMyFitness’s digital strategy: Its application programming interface connects to a wide array of other fitness apps and devices—including Nike’s.

In contrast, there’s Runtastic, a fitness app maker which has put its brand on a number of devices it sells, from heart-rate monitors to apparel to bike cadence sensors to wireless scales. Some are just generic devices with the Runtastic name attached, while others, like the Libra scale and the Orbit activity tracker, are deftly integrated into Runtastic’s mobile apps and website. (The only thing Runtastic isn’t selling, it seems, is shoes.)

Collecting The Data, Sale Or No

The underlying thread here is that the savviest fitness-app developers are finding ways to link free software with paid hardware. Rather than slap tiny mobile banners on their apps, they’re getting directly involved in the sale, by tying shopping to specific moments in an active person’s life. Your shoes are worn out? Buy some new ones. Not making progress on your bike rides? Try a heart-rate monitor or cadence sensor to analyze your performance.

And ultimately it may not matter if MapMyFitness sells a lot of shoes, or gets a cut of the proceeds. Just knowing what its users are wearing could be invaluable market research for Under Armour as it tries to gain share of feet in the shoe market. 

Nike’s running-app strategy, which assumes people live in a Nike universe, works well for retaining current customers and prompting them to buy new shoes. But it closes it off to what’s happening in the world outside. Once people stop buying Nike shoes, Nike stops gathering data. And in a digital world, without data, you might as well close up shop.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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Websites That Sell Reports Social Media SEO Continues to Increase in Importance – Free Press Release Center (press release)

Websites That Sell Reports Social Media SEO Continues to Increase in Importance
Free Press Release Center (press release)
Websites That Sell, a Company On The Sunshine Coast specializing in SEO in Australia, highlights the importance of optimizing all communications with consumers, including those on social networks, as search engines are now taking the social networks …

and more »

View full post on SEO – Google News

How to Sell Your SEO Plan With 5 Slides in 5 Minutes – Search Engine Watch


Search Engine Watch
How to Sell Your SEO Plan With 5 Slides in 5 Minutes
Search Engine Watch
There are so many benefits to implementing an SEO strategy, yet convincing a company to get on-board can feel like pulling teeth. Oftentimes the biggest challenge is in navigating the company's complex organizational structure, and selling your case to

and more »

View full post on SEO – Google News

How to Sell Your SEO Plan With 5 Slides in 5 Minutes

You never really have more than five minutes to make “the sale.” Here are five different people offering different common objections to implementing an SEO strategy. Each scenario offers ideas for making your pitch in five minutes with five slides.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

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