Posts tagged Quality

Quantity versus Quality, Must I Choose Sides in My Content Marketing Strategy? by @billbelew_com

One of the biggest objections I encounter to the content marketing strategy of updating a site multiple times daily is the thinking (sometimes out loud!) that content must suffer if you are posting often.  “Nobody has that much to say that can be considered quality content.” Baloney. Malarkey. Hooey.  Or, “I prefer to do quality […]

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Bill Belew

Professor, Speaker, Author, all-around old man. Fresh from teaching a 48-hour MBA course in Marketing with Social Media at a graduate school in Silicon Valley, Bill delivers insights from recent, real and relevant case studies. Bill has been working in social media for more than 8 years and has more than 90 million unique visitors from organic search to his network of sites and in a variety of niches. He knows what works, what doesn’t, what can kill a site, and what can cause it to grow. Bill has a network of 5000+ Meetup followers in the heart of Silicon Valley. He is a paid, professional, international, in-demand speaker.

The post Quantity versus Quality, Must I Choose Sides in My Content Marketing Strategy? by @billbelew_com appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Secrets For SEO Link Building In 2014 (A Hint: Quality Counts) – Forbes


Forbes
Secrets For SEO Link Building In 2014 (A Hint: Quality Counts)
Forbes
Great SEO that reflects Google's updates doesn't need to be expensive, the company told me, and Link Building is as important in 2014 as it has ever been. Said Shelton: “As long as people continue to create, value and trust links on the Internet as a

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4 Reasons You Should Start Obsessing About AdWords Quality Score

Your quality score is very important and you’d be crazy to ignore it. Simply put, if you’re an AdWords advertiser, improving your quality score should be at the top of your agenda. Here are four reasons why quality scores are so important.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Amazon And IBM vs. Open Source Hadoop: Bigness May Not Beat Quality

At the heart of the Big Data movement is Hadoop, an open-source framework used for storing and processing large quantities of data. For years open source startups Cloudera and Hortonworks have had the Hadoop market largely to themselves. Sure, proprietary software vendors like Oracle, Microsoft and others have circled the market, but their participation has largely come through partnerships with these dedicated Hadoop startups.

Now, according to a new report from Forrester, the legacy tech vendors may demonstrate the most compelling strategies, even if their current Hadoop offerings still leave much to be desired. What’s unclear is how these proprietary vendors can hope to deliver a robust product based on an open-source project to which they contribute little and therefore influence even less.

Hadoop: No Longer Optional

Getting Hadoop right is a big deal. As Forrester notes, much is at stake in the shifting data infrastructure landscape, and Hadoop “form[s] the cornerstone of any flexible future data management platform.” In other words, if you’re a tech vendor hoping to remain relevant in the modern enterprise, you need a Hadoop story.

Hadoop is particularly interesting because it enables enterprises to store and analyze massive quantities of data at comparatively little cost. As Forrester finds, enterprises currently analyze a mere 12% of their data. To some degree, this is because it’s often unclear what to do with one’s data. 

Hadoop eases the transition into Big Data because it encourages enterprises to store their data at lower costs, only to process it later once the company figures out how to best analyze the data.

While it’s true, as I’ve written before, that this can result in some enterprises viewing Hadoop as their “unsupervised digital landfill,” enterprises are becoming increasingly savvy about Hadoop and Big Data—generally, marrying Hadoop’s analytical capabilities with a real-time data processing engine like a NoSQL database to glean intelligence from a company’s data and act on it in real time. 

Given this maturing view of Hadoop, who are the vendors to watch?

The Elephants In The Room

Oddly, Forrester suggests we look beyond vendors that actually invest heavily in Hadoop’s development.

In open source, being the source of code is even more important than owning the source code. So in the same way a proprietary software vendor can charge for software licenses because it keeps its intellectual property under wraps, the market power of an open source vendor directly correlates to that vendor’s influence over an open-source project—that is, to how much it gives away.

This is why Forrester’s analysis strikes me as slightly askew. Rather than focusing exclusively on the current state of vendors’ Hadoop offerings—where the Hadoop startups shine precisely because they contribute most to Hadoop’s development—Forrester suggests the real winners going forward are the big tech companies like IBM, Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Pivotal.

Credit: Forrester (Used with permission)

Credit: Forrester (Used with permission)

Surprisingly, while “strategy” includes licensing and pricing, ability to execute, product road map and customer support, Forrester doesn’t comment at all on the companies’ community outreach. As ReadWrite has reported before, by contributing little to Hadoop’s development, vendors like IBM and AWS are poorly positioned to shape its direction, as Hadoop founder (and Cloudera employee) Doug Cutting posits:

Similarly, Hortonworks CEO Rob Bearden suggested that community is crucial to ensuring Hadoop’s ongoing relevance:

Hadoop is becoming the cornerstone of the modern data architecture, and we remain committed to working with and contributing back to the community to ensure that the new Hadoop core reaches its full potential as the next-generation data platform.

Can others simply ride the bandwagon without paying for its maintenance?

Does It Matter?

Sometimes life—and open source—isn’t fair. Amazon has made far more money on MySQL, for example, than MySQL or Oracle (which acquired it through its Sun acquisition) have. Similarly, IBM has made far more money with Linux than Red Hat, the Linux leader, has.

But Forrester’s view may not be completely accurate, either. For example, in the area of “Customer Support,” Hortonworks got a 5 out of 5, which makes sense. Hortonworks contributes a lot of code to Hadoop. But Pivotal and IBM also scored 5′s, which doesn’t make much sense.

Perhaps Forrester felt those companies could provide great customer support for their proprietary products built around Hadoop? Fair enough. But it’s impossible for any vendor that isn’t deeply invested in the development of an open-source project to match the support capability of a vendor that has made such an investment. 

Amazon and others will almost certainly build great services around Hadoop, but ultimately they’re in a poor position to support customers on Hadoop because they don’t contribute to its development. As such, they’re always forced to be followers, not leaders, on the project.

It’s no wonder then that Shaun Connolly, Hortonworks vice president of corporate strategy, wrote to me to say “While all four areas of Strategy are important, we are especially proud that we received 5 out of 5 for the Product Road Map and Customer Support areas of the Strategy section.”

He should be proud. This is how companies like Hortonworks (and Cloudera) guarantee excellent service for their customers.

More Than The Elephant

Ultimately, it seems that Forrester’s ranking of Hadoop vendors has less to do with Hadoop and more to do with how Hadoop fits into their larger product strategies. For instance, of IBM, Forrester writes, “IBM’s road map includes continuing to integrate the BigInsights Hadoop solution with related IBM assets like SPSS advanced analytics, workload management for high-performance computing, BI tools, and data management and modeling tools.”

Hadoop, in other words, is a nice complement for these vendors—not the main event.

This may be fine. No doubt IBM, AWS and others will make a lot of money enriching their products with Hadoop. But for those companies that want to get value from Hadoop itself, they may be better served looking to those that contribute most to its development: Cloudera and Hortonworks. Only these vendors are in a credible position to influence Hadoop’s roadmap, and support it best.

View full post on ReadWrite

Google Places Quality Guidelines Updated

Google quietly announced within the Google Help forums that they have made a clarification update to their Place quality guidelines to help business owners know what they can name their business within Google Local and what they can not. In short, Google is allowing a single descriptor within the…



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View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Google Places Updates Quality Guidelines to Include Business Descriptor

Google Places for Business recently announced an update to its quality guidelines that allows businesses to add a descriptor to its business name that clarifies what the business is about. Some worry this opens listings up to major spam.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Google’s Matt Cutts: Backlink Relevancy Is A Big Win In Terms Of Search Quality

In today’s video from Matt Cutts, Google’s head of search spam reaffirms the significance of backlinks. The video is in response to the following question: Does the big G have a version of the search engine that totally excludes any backlink relevancy? I’m wondering what search…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

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7 Ways to Attract Higher Quality Links With Better On-Page Content

With the nonstop information being published online, people have to pick and choose what they read, share, and link to. Here’s how to make sure your content is link-worthy, your site is easily searchable, and you send all the right signals to users.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Nintendo’s Next Big Idea: A “Quality Of Life” Console

Two weeks ago, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata said the company was considering a big shift in strategy after it changed its financial forecast for the fiscal year to reflect a third straight annual loss as a result of “unexpectedly weak sales.”

Nintendo fans and investors hoped this news was a signal that the company was finally ready to give into the immense external pressures to join the mobile bandwagon and port its popular games to smartphones. But after rejecting that particular notion on Monday, Iwata announced the company’s big plans to create a third platform to complement the Wii U and 3DS on Thursday evening.

“What Nintendo will try to achieve in the next 10 years is a platform business that improves people’s quality of life in enjoyable ways,” Iwata said. “What I see as our first step into a new business area in our endeavor to improve QOL is the theme of ‘health.’ Of course, defining a new entertainment business that seeks to improve QOL creates various possibilities for the future such as ‘learning’ and ‘lifestyle,’ but it is our intention to take ‘health’ as our first step.”

Iwata noted that Nintendo’s ability to transform itself has been the key to the company’s 125 years of sustained success. So as other companies follow each other into the increasingly crowded market of mobile applications and wearable technologies, Iwata believes Nintendo must venture “into a new blue ocean.” 

“Instead of providing mobile or wearable features, [this integrated hardware-software platform] will be characterized by a new area of what we like to call ‘non-wearable’ technology,” Iwata said. “When we use ‘health’ as a keyword, some may inevitably think about ‘Wii Fit.’ However, we are considering themes that we have not incorporated to games for our existing platforms. Including the hardware that will enable such an idea, we will aim to establish a blue ocean.”

Why Health Could Pay Off

Nintendo’s foray into health may come as a bit of a surprise, but there’s certainly a market out there for living room fitness solutions. Just ask Tony Horton.

 

Nintendo sees an enormous opportunity in health since many people care deeply about their wellbeing but lack the tools to sufficiently capture their focus and engagement for extended periods of time. But if Nintendo could pull off a fun living room solution that also promotes health, it could make doing the right thing for one’s body less of a chore and more of a game.

“As those who are already suffering from illness can seek medical care, our new business domain would be providing preventive measures which would require us to enable people to monitor their health and offer them appropriate propositions,” Iwata said.

Iwata touched briefly on a number of Nintendo’s current health-themed titles, such as “Wii Fit,” “Art Academy,” “Brain Age,” and “English Training,” noting that this next-generation “quality of life” platform would similarly engage and entertain consumers in a way that’s beneficial to their lifestyles. (Nintendo also created a “Cooking Navigator” game, but that’s only available in Japan.)

Expanding—Not Replacing—How We Play

Gamers need not worry: Nintendo’s health platform, which the company called “something different from our traditional business,” won’t be working alone. As Iwata explained, Nintendo’s “quality of life” platform won’t replace the company’s dedicated gaming systems, but will be built in conjunction with them.

 

Nintendo envisions a happy symbiosis between its gaming platforms and this new health platform. New and old titles and characters from Nintendo’s gaming platforms will be used to power the health system’s applications based around health, education and lifestyle—the entertainment feeds the education. But Nintendo has yet to divulge how it plans to make its health platform enrich the games it sells, which is likely the key to making this two-platform system work.

Nintendo knows how to make two consoles work in tandem—the Wii U and 3DS share some limited connectivity for certain video games—but Nintendo would need to convince consumers that two Nintendo platforms are better than one from either Microsoft or Sony. 

At this moment, Nintendo is losing the console battle: Despite a number of hit games last year, includinga new Zelda game for 3DS and a new Mario game for Wii U, neither console has approximated the enthusiasm surrounding the more-recent console releases in the PS4 and Xbox One. Nintendo said it expects to sell only 2.8 million Wii U consoles for the full fiscal year; meanwhile, the PS4 sold 4.2 million units as of December 28 and the Xbox One sold 3.9 million units by the end of 2013. At least Nintendo’s  cheaper 3DS portable is selling well, at 11.5 million units to date.

Nintendo’s fate for this generation of consoles may be sealed, but its expansion into health and its continuity of integrated hardware and software hold some promise for the future of gaming. After all, if a video game can help you lose weight, wouldn’t you want to try it?

Lead image via Reuters; side images via Nintendo

View full post on ReadWrite

Nintendo’s Next Console: A “Quality Of Life” Platform

Two weeks ago, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata said the company was considering a big shift in strategy after it changed its financial forecast for the fiscal year to reflect a third straight annual loss as a result of “unexpectedly weak sales.”

Nintendo fans and investors hoped this news was a signal that the company was finally ready to give into the immense external pressures to join the mobile bandwagon and port its popular games to smartphones. But after rejecting that particular notion on Monday, Iwata announced the company’s big plans to create a third platform to complement the Wii U and 3DS on Thursday evening.

“What Nintendo will try to achieve in the next 10 years is a platform business that improves people’s quality of life in enjoyable ways,” Iwata said. “What I see as our first step into a new business area in our endeavor to improve QOL is the theme of ‘health.’ Of course, defining a new entertainment business that seeks to improve QOL creates various possibilities for the future such as ‘learning’ and ‘lifestyle,’ but it is our intention to take ‘health’ as our first step.”

Iwata noted that Nintendo’s ability to transform itself has been the key to the company’s 125 years of sustained success. So as other companies follow each other into the increasingly crowded market of mobile applications and wearable technologies, Iwata believes Nintendo must venture “into a new blue ocean.” 

“Instead of providing mobile or wearable features, [this integrated hardware-software platform] will be characterized by a new area of what we like to call ‘non-wearable’ technology,” Iwata said. “When we use ‘health’ as a keyword, some may inevitably think about ‘Wii Fit.’ However, we are considering themes that we have not incorporated to games for our existing platforms. Including the hardware that will enable such an idea, we will aim to establish a blue ocean.”

Why Health Could Pay Off

Nintendo’s foray into health may come as a bit of a surprise, but there’s certainly a market out there for living room fitness solutions. Just ask Tony Horton.

 

Nintendo sees an enormous opportunity in health since many people care deeply about their wellbeing but lack the tools to sufficiently capture their focus and engagement for extended periods of time. But if Nintendo could pull off a fun living room solution that also promotes health, it could make doing the right thing for one’s body less of a chore and more of a game.

“As those who are already suffering from illness can seek medical care, our new business domain would be providing preventive measures which would require us to enable people to monitor their health and offer them appropriate propositions,” Iwata said.

Iwata touched briefly on a number of Nintendo’s current health-themed titles, such as “Wii Fit,” “Art Academy,” “Brain Age,” and “English Training,” noting that this next-generation “quality of life” platform would similarly engage and entertain consumers in a way that’s beneficial to their lifestyles. (Nintendo also created a “Cooking Navigator” game, but that’s only available in Japan.)

Expanding—Not Replacing—How We Play

Gamers need not worry: Nintendo’s health platform, which the company called “something different from our traditional business,” won’t be working alone. As Iwata explained, Nintendo’s “quality of life” platform won’t replace the company’s dedicated gaming systems, but will be built in conjunction with them.

 

Nintendo envisions a happy symbiosis between its gaming platforms and this new health platform. New and old titles and characters from Nintendo’s gaming platforms will be used to power the health system’s applications based around health, education and lifestyle—the entertainment feeds the education. But Nintendo has yet to divulge how it plans to make its health platform enrich the games it sells, which is likely the key to making this two-platform system work.

Nintendo knows how to make two consoles work in tandem—the Wii U and 3DS share some limited connectivity for certain video games—but Nintendo would need to convince consumers that two Nintendo platforms are better than one from either Microsoft or Sony. 

At this moment, Nintendo is losing the console battle: Despite a number of hit games last year, includinga new Zelda game for 3DS and a new Mario game for Wii U, neither console has approximated the enthusiasm surrounding the more-recent console releases in the PS4 and Xbox One. Nintendo said it expects to sell only 2.8 million Wii U consoles for the full fiscal year; meanwhile, the PS4 sold 4.2 million units as of December 28 and the Xbox One sold 3.9 million units by the end of 2013. At least Nintendo’s  cheaper 3DS portable is selling well, at 11.5 million units to date.

Nintendo’s fate for this generation of consoles may be sealed, but its expansion into health and its continuity of integrated hardware and software hold some promise for the future of gaming. After all, if a video game can help you lose weight, wouldn’t you want to try it? 

View full post on ReadWrite

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