Posts tagged past

Speaker Profile: How Fullpower’s Philippe Kahn Navigates The Watch’s Past, Present And Future

Wearable World Congress, ReadWrite’s signature annual conference in San Francisco on May 19-20, will feature the key players who are shaping wearable technology and the Internet of Things. This series profiles some of the experts who will be speaking at the conference.  

Swiss watchmakers, legendary for creating precise, stylish timepieces, have faced their fair share of challenges. Their analog timepieces have withstood the advent of quartz watches and novelty devices foisting calculators, garish video games and more. Now smartwatches join the ranks as the latest rivals. 

Re-enter Philippe Kahn, CEO of Fullpower, the company behind the MotionX software that powered many of the original activity- and sleep-tracking bands. Recently he’s been working with well-known Swiss watchmakers to create a new line of horological smartwatches. 

Buy tickets now: Wearable World Congress, May 19-20

Fullpower’s technology now aims to blend the digital and analog worlds by combining activity tracking, sleep monitoring and cloud services, with always-on time and date, as well as battery life that’s measured in years, not hours or days. 

I caught up with Kahn, who will be speaking at Wearable World Congress next month, to talk with him about innovation and what got him interested in wearables in the first place.


As a consumer, what excites you about wearables? What irritates you?

I hate charging devices. I already have my laptop and my smartphone. I don’t want to worry about a third device. That’s the biggest irritation. I do love beautiful objects and iconic design, even though I am a geek. I just love beautiful objects, and I like wearing beautiful objects. I love them when they are like an Alpina watch.

As the great Miles Davis used to say: “If you want to play good, you have to look good!”

There’s a perceived mad rush to improve user experience. How do you see this future playing out? What are the key developments that need to happen for us to get there?

Because wearables need to be worn, the charging and invasiveness factors are key to the user experience. For example, we built the Alpina horological smartwatch. It is a beautiful Swiss watch, [but] we had to solve an impossible technology problem and deliver two-plus years of battery life. And we did. That was the number one experience request from users. A watch should be able to tell the time, all the time, every time.

Tell me about the moment when you decided that you needed to solve the power issue.

When we started our company in 2003, nobody was thinking about wearables. We realized that if we wanted people to use them 24/7, we needed to solve the power issue and make the technology invisible. So we decided to build a strong technology foundation focused on breakthrough power management technology and miniaturization. 

Of course this was a roadmap, but we called our company Fullpower and the technology platform MotionX. We thought that this would keep our focus on what really matters.

What are the top five things companies should consider in seeking to follow in the footsteps of horological designs?

Fullpower built the MotionX platform so that iconic brands such as Mondaine, Alpina, Frederique Constant and others have the flexibility to build beautiful objects. That’s the challenge: To make the technology invisible, and yet deliver breakthrough battery life and miniature form factor without ever compromising on quality and accuracy. It’s a beautiful thing. 

To hear more from Philippe Kahn and other innovators and experts, register for Wearable World Congress 2015, May 19-20 in San Francisco. Early bird prices end soon!

Photo courtesy of Philippe Kahn/Fullpower

View full post on ReadWrite

Speaker Profile: How Fullpower’s Philippe Kahn Navigates The Watch’s Past And Present

Wearable World Congress, ReadWrite’s signature annual conference in San Francisco on May 19-20, will feature the key players who are shaping wearable technology and the Internet of Things. This series profiles some of the experts who will be speaking at the conference.  

Swiss watchmakers, legendary for creating precise, stylish timepieces, have faced their fair share of challenges. Their analog timepieces have withstood the advent of quartz watches and novelty devices foisting calculators, garish video games and more. Now smartwatches join the ranks as the latest rivals. 

Re-enter Philippe Kahn, CEO of Fullpower, the company behind the MotionX software that powered many of the original activity- and sleep-tracking bands. Recently he’s been working with well-known Swiss watchmakers to create a new line of horological smartwatches. 

Buy tickets now: Wearable World Congress, May 19-20

Fullpower’s technology now aims to blend the digital and analog worlds by combining activity tracking, sleep monitoring and cloud services, with always-on time and date, as well as battery life that’s measured in years, not hours or days. 

I caught up with Kahn, who will be speaking at Wearable World Congress next month, to talk with him about innovation and what got him interested in wearables in the first place.


As a consumer, what excites you about wearables? What irritates you?

I hate charging devices. I already have my laptop and my smartphone. I don’t want to worry about a third device. That’s the biggest irritation. I do love beautiful objects and iconic design, even though I am a geek. I just love beautiful objects, and I like wearing beautiful objects. I love them when they are like an Alpina watch.

As the great Miles Davis used to say: “If you want to play good, you have to look good!”

There’s a perceived mad rush to improve user experience. How do you see this future playing out? What are the key developments that need to happen for us to get there?

Because wearables need to be worn, the charging and invasiveness factors are key to the user experience. For example, we built the Alpina horological smartwatch. It is a beautiful Swiss watch, [but] we had to solve an impossible technology problem and deliver two-plus years of battery life. And we did. That was the number one experience request from users. A watch should be able to tell the time, all the time, every time.

Tell me about the moment when you decided that you needed to solve the power issue.

When we started our company in 2003, nobody was thinking about wearables. We realized that if we wanted people to use them 24/7, we needed to solve the power issue and make the technology invisible. So we decided to build a strong technology foundation focused on breakthrough power management technology and miniaturization. 

Of course this was a roadmap, but we called our company Fullpower and the technology platform MotionX. We thought that this would keep our focus on what really matters.

What are the top five things companies should consider in seeking to follow in the footsteps of horological designs?

Fullpower built the MotionX platform so that iconic brands such as Mondaine, Alpina, Frederique Constant and others have the flexibility to build beautiful objects. That’s the challenge: To make the technology invisible, and yet deliver breakthrough battery life and miniature form factor without ever compromising on quality and accuracy. It’s a beautiful thing. 

To hear more from Philippe Kahn and other innovators and experts, register for Wearable World Congress 2015, May 19-20 in San Francisco. Early bird prices end soon!

Photo courtesy of Philippe Kahn/Fullpower

View full post on ReadWrite

Google Panda & Penguin Lack Real-Time Updates, Despite Google’s Past Statements

Google had given statements that its Panda and Penguin anti-spam fighting filters were running constantly. Now it says there’s still delays between data pushes.

The post Google Panda & Penguin Lack Real-Time Updates, Despite Google’s Past Statements appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Keeping The Internet’s Past Alive—And “Boring As Hell” (In A Good Way)

On March 9, Gigaom abruptly laid off its entire staff, including me. It’s heartbreaking to lose a job like that, but support networks have a way of making you feel certain new opportunities are on the way.

What’s not certain is the past. During my two years at Gigaom, I wrote close to 1,000 articles. My senior colleagues have five times more in their archives. We have no idea if or when Gigaom.com will be taken down. It’s as if years of our lives could disappear in an instant.

There are support networks for this kind of situation as well. The Internet Archive, for example, has been grabbing Gigaom’s web pages as fast as it can, according to archivist and software curator Jason Scott. I had the chance to sit in on Scott’s SXSW panel and felt the worry lift from my shoulders just the slightest bit.

Remembering The Internet—All Of It

Most of us know the Internet Archive from the Wayback Machine, which allows you to drop in and browse a website at any point in its history. Here’s Gigaom founder Om Malik bragging about Business 2.0 beating Wired in a game of softball in 2004:


Internet Archive doesn’t just do web pages. It preserves software, books, movies and anything else that could someday disappear or change form. As of January, you can play classic games like Oregon Trail in-browser. You can easily spend hours basking in the nostalgia.


The Oregon Trail

A lot of these games are incredibly rare. There’s ET the Extra-Terrestrial, a game that sold so poorly that Atari buried most of the copies in a landfill until they were recovered last year. And then there is Munchkin, which was banned after Atari sued its creator Philips over its likeness to Pac-Man.

The games’ addition created a huge splash in the media. It was the first time most people had access for decades, unless they still had a copy and the hardware to run it, or the knowledge to find a ROM through a service like BitTorrent.

History Should Be Boring, In A Good Way

“What I really want is for it to be boring as hell,” Scott said, meaning that historical materials should be so at our fingertips that it no longer feels novel to access them. (While on stage, he casually began browsing the web in browser pioneer Netscape.)

That means emulating the experience of playing a game or visiting a webpage (the pixel should feel and react the same), but also providing documentation so future generations know why the heck a game that kind of does look a lot like Pac-Man is so important. It’s just a big online museum that preserves some of humanities’ greatest works the same way the Louvre takes care of the Mona Lisa. 


Scott acknowledged Internet Archive’s coverage areas can be spotty. Part of that is the legal gray area that can come with posting commercial works. Internet Archive usually complies with takedown requests if a product is still being sold. A possible solution is posting works behind a paywall, so their creator can still get their due. But once it becomes public domain, it is already preserved in its original form.

Save Everything

Scott urged audience members to preserve as much of their personal work history as possible. That means putting brainstorming napkins, every version of a software program and colleague’s business cards in a shoebox and taking it back out 10, 20, 40 years in the future. We can’t rely on one web site or company to take care of its own preservation.

“The vast majority of human photos are up on Facebook and nowhere else, and that’s a dangerous thing,” Scott said. “I of course believe grab everything.”

After that, he said, entropy and time can choose which digital works we choose to remember.

This past week has made me optimistic that the world will choose to remember Gigaom. But even if it doesn’t, I feel safer knowing that when I’m 80 I can hop into the Wayback Machine and relive a few of those 1,000 articles.

Lead photo by DRs Kulturarvsprojekt; screenshots courtesy of the Internet Archive

View full post on ReadWrite

Girl Scout Cookies Finally Go Digital, But Online Safety Remains In The Past

In the face of lagging sales, the century-old Girl Scouts of the USA organization will finally allow its young entrepreneurs to utilize technology to make sales. 

Called Digital Cookie, the marketing software will equip Girl Scouts to sell cookies online in one of two ways depending on their market area, the Girl Scouts of the USA announced. Some scouts will invite customers to peruse their customized online cookie websites. Others will take in-person orders using a new mobile sales app. As with all orders, online cookie sales will only be available during Girl Scout cookie season, a six-to-eight week period in winter that varies by location. (Check the Girl Scout website to see when cookies are available near you.)

It’s about time for the 102-year-old organization that puts emphasis on girls’ futures modernized. As STEM skills become increasingly important to a wide number of careers, Girl Scouts will finally get a chance to exercise their technology skills while selling cookies.

“The future of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, Digital Cookie will introduce vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and e-commerce to more than 1 million excited Girl Scouts who will be in the driver’s seat of their own digital cookie businesses,” the GSUSA announced in a press release.

STEM careers aside, there’s likely a second reason for the GSUSA’s final relent—lagging cookie sales. Increasingly health-savvy Americans and a crumbling economy and lower Girl Scout membership have led to fewer treats being sold in recent years. According to the GSUSA, digital sales should increase the $800 million annual sales significantly. 

See also: Maybe The Carnegie Science Center Didn’t Just Diss Science-Minded Girls

Digital Cookie is the first online platform to ever be approved by the GSUSA, which previously banned online sales claiming concerns for both the scouts and their cookie customers. You may have noticed one side effect of these safety concerns in the fact that most Girl Scouts no longer go door to door, but sell cookies with a troop leader at a booth in a public place.

Rather than utilizing standard (and pricey) digital privacy precautions however, GSUSA is instead requiring all scouts and their supervisors take an Internet safety pledge before using Digital Cookie. Among other tenets of the pledge: scout supervisors must approve any and all changes girls make before they go live, and no identifying information about the scout may be posted publicly on the site. Seems legit. 

As was the case with the low-tech technique of cookie selling, 100% of all profits made on Digital Cookie will go right back to the Girl Scout council that sponsors the sale. Just how much goes to the troops themselves, however, came up for debate last year when lawsuits between local Girl Scout councils and the GSUSA indicated that a hefty chunk of cookie proceeds go toward funding the GSUSA’s pensions rather than Girl Scout activities. 

Digital Cookie participation will depend on market area, but the GSUSA announced that the “majority” of girl scout councils will be on board for the 2014-2015 cookie season, with more adopting a version 2.0 by the end of 2015. Visit the Digital Cookie site to see if you can buy Girl Scout cookies digitally in your area.

Photo by Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar 

View full post on ReadWrite

Girl Scout Cookies Finally Go Digital, But Online Safety Precautions Are Still In The Past

In the face of lagging sales, the century-old Girl Scouts of the USA organization will finally allow its young entrepreneurs to utilize technology to make sales. 

Called Digital Cookie, the marketing software will equip Girl Scouts to sell cookies online in one of two ways depending on their market area, the Girl Scouts of the USA announced. Some scouts will invite customers to peruse their customized online cookie websites. Others will take in-person orders using a new mobile sales app. As with all orders, online cookie sales will only be available during Girl Scout cookie season, a six-to-eight week period in winter that varies by location. (Check the Girl Scout website to see when cookies are available near you.)

It’s about time for the 102-year-old organization that puts emphasis on girls’ futures modernized. As STEM skills become increasingly important to a wide number of careers, Girl Scouts will finally get a chance to exercise their technology skills while selling cookies.

“The future of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, Digital Cookie will introduce vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and e-commerce to more than 1 million excited Girl Scouts who will be in the driver’s seat of their own digital cookie businesses,” the GSUSA announced in a press release.

STEM careers aside, there’s likely a second reason for the GSUSA’s final relent—lagging cookie sales. Increasingly health-savvy Americans and a crumbling economy and lower Girl Scout membership have led to fewer treats being sold in recent years. According to the GSUSA, digital sales should increase the $800 million annual sales significantly. 

See also: Maybe The Carnegie Science Center Didn’t Just Diss Science-Minded Girls

Digital Cookie is the first online platform to ever be approved by the GSUSA, which previously banned online sales claiming concerns for both the scouts and their cookie customers. You may have noticed one side effect of these safety concerns in the fact that most Girl Scouts no longer go door to door, but sell cookies with a troop leader at a booth in a public place.

Rather than utilizing standard (and pricey) digital privacy precautions however, GSUSA is instead requiring all scouts and their supervisors take an Internet safety pledge before using Digital Cookie. Among other tenets of the pledge: scout supervisors must approve any and all changes girls make before they go live, and no identifying information about the scout may be posted publicly on the site. Seems legit. 

As was the case with the low-tech technique of cookie selling, 100% of all profits made on Digital Cookie will go right back to the Girl Scout council that sponsors the sale. Just how much goes to the troops themselves, however, came up for debate last year when lawsuits between local Girl Scout councils and the GSUSA indicated that a hefty chunk of cookie proceeds go toward funding the GSUSA’s pensions rather than Girl Scout activities. 

Digital Cookie participation will depend on market area, but the GSUSA announced that the “majority” of girl scout councils will be on board for the 2014-2015 cookie season, with more adopting a version 2.0 by the end of 2015. Visit the Digital Cookie site to see if you can buy Girl Scout cookies digitally in your area.

Photo by Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar 

View full post on ReadWrite

3 Lessons in Content Marketing From the Past by @BrianHonigman

Content marketing seems to be all anybody in the marketing world talks about these days. Although it seemingly took the industry by storm overnight, content marketing has actually been around for a very long time. This is partially because content marketing is pretty loosely defined. To paraphrase the Content Marketing Institute’s definition, content marketing is essentially creating something (content can come in many formats) that you think will be of value to a target group in hopes of attracting customers and driving future profitable action. Given that rather nebulous definition, it only makes sense that if you look back at marketing […]

The post 3 Lessons in Content Marketing From the Past by @BrianHonigman appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Using The Past To Predict The Future For Local Search

What does local SEO have in store for us? Columnist Myles Anderson takes a look at how local ranking factors have changed over time.

The post Using The Past To Predict The Future For Local Search appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

An SEM Christmas Carol: Q4 Past, Present & Yet To Come

SEM no longer lives in a vacuum, Columnist Susan Waldes argues. Do you have the resources to thrive in an increasingly complex future?

The post An SEM Christmas Carol: Q4 Past, Present & Yet To Come appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Seo Taiji opens up about past scandal + wishes ex-wife Lee Ji Ah happiness – allkpop

Seo Taiji opens up about past scandal + wishes ex-wife Lee Ji Ah happiness
allkpop
During this episode, the panel carefully asked Seo Taiji about his former wife Lee Ji Ah. Starting at the 0:38 mark in the video above, Seo Taiji opened up about his feelings regarding the scandal, and thought back to when it first broke out. "At that

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