Posts tagged past

Girl Scout Cookies Finally Go Digital, But Online Safety Remains In The Past

In the face of lagging sales, the century-old Girl Scouts of the USA organization will finally allow its young entrepreneurs to utilize technology to make sales. 

Called Digital Cookie, the marketing software will equip Girl Scouts to sell cookies online in one of two ways depending on their market area, the Girl Scouts of the USA announced. Some scouts will invite customers to peruse their customized online cookie websites. Others will take in-person orders using a new mobile sales app. As with all orders, online cookie sales will only be available during Girl Scout cookie season, a six-to-eight week period in winter that varies by location. (Check the Girl Scout website to see when cookies are available near you.)

It’s about time for the 102-year-old organization that puts emphasis on girls’ futures modernized. As STEM skills become increasingly important to a wide number of careers, Girl Scouts will finally get a chance to exercise their technology skills while selling cookies.

“The future of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, Digital Cookie will introduce vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and e-commerce to more than 1 million excited Girl Scouts who will be in the driver’s seat of their own digital cookie businesses,” the GSUSA announced in a press release.

STEM careers aside, there’s likely a second reason for the GSUSA’s final relent—lagging cookie sales. Increasingly health-savvy Americans and a crumbling economy and lower Girl Scout membership have led to fewer treats being sold in recent years. According to the GSUSA, digital sales should increase the $800 million annual sales significantly. 

See also: Maybe The Carnegie Science Center Didn’t Just Diss Science-Minded Girls

Digital Cookie is the first online platform to ever be approved by the GSUSA, which previously banned online sales claiming concerns for both the scouts and their cookie customers. You may have noticed one side effect of these safety concerns in the fact that most Girl Scouts no longer go door to door, but sell cookies with a troop leader at a booth in a public place.

Rather than utilizing standard (and pricey) digital privacy precautions however, GSUSA is instead requiring all scouts and their supervisors take an Internet safety pledge before using Digital Cookie. Among other tenets of the pledge: scout supervisors must approve any and all changes girls make before they go live, and no identifying information about the scout may be posted publicly on the site. Seems legit. 

As was the case with the low-tech technique of cookie selling, 100% of all profits made on Digital Cookie will go right back to the Girl Scout council that sponsors the sale. Just how much goes to the troops themselves, however, came up for debate last year when lawsuits between local Girl Scout councils and the GSUSA indicated that a hefty chunk of cookie proceeds go toward funding the GSUSA’s pensions rather than Girl Scout activities. 

Digital Cookie participation will depend on market area, but the GSUSA announced that the “majority” of girl scout councils will be on board for the 2014-2015 cookie season, with more adopting a version 2.0 by the end of 2015. Visit the Digital Cookie site to see if you can buy Girl Scout cookies digitally in your area.

Photo by Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar 

View full post on ReadWrite

Girl Scout Cookies Finally Go Digital, But Online Safety Precautions Are Still In The Past

In the face of lagging sales, the century-old Girl Scouts of the USA organization will finally allow its young entrepreneurs to utilize technology to make sales. 

Called Digital Cookie, the marketing software will equip Girl Scouts to sell cookies online in one of two ways depending on their market area, the Girl Scouts of the USA announced. Some scouts will invite customers to peruse their customized online cookie websites. Others will take in-person orders using a new mobile sales app. As with all orders, online cookie sales will only be available during Girl Scout cookie season, a six-to-eight week period in winter that varies by location. (Check the Girl Scout website to see when cookies are available near you.)

It’s about time for the 102-year-old organization that puts emphasis on girls’ futures modernized. As STEM skills become increasingly important to a wide number of careers, Girl Scouts will finally get a chance to exercise their technology skills while selling cookies.

“The future of the Girl Scout Cookie Program, Digital Cookie will introduce vital 21st-century lessons about online marketing, app usage, and e-commerce to more than 1 million excited Girl Scouts who will be in the driver’s seat of their own digital cookie businesses,” the GSUSA announced in a press release.

STEM careers aside, there’s likely a second reason for the GSUSA’s final relent—lagging cookie sales. Increasingly health-savvy Americans and a crumbling economy and lower Girl Scout membership have led to fewer treats being sold in recent years. According to the GSUSA, digital sales should increase the $800 million annual sales significantly. 

See also: Maybe The Carnegie Science Center Didn’t Just Diss Science-Minded Girls

Digital Cookie is the first online platform to ever be approved by the GSUSA, which previously banned online sales claiming concerns for both the scouts and their cookie customers. You may have noticed one side effect of these safety concerns in the fact that most Girl Scouts no longer go door to door, but sell cookies with a troop leader at a booth in a public place.

Rather than utilizing standard (and pricey) digital privacy precautions however, GSUSA is instead requiring all scouts and their supervisors take an Internet safety pledge before using Digital Cookie. Among other tenets of the pledge: scout supervisors must approve any and all changes girls make before they go live, and no identifying information about the scout may be posted publicly on the site. Seems legit. 

As was the case with the low-tech technique of cookie selling, 100% of all profits made on Digital Cookie will go right back to the Girl Scout council that sponsors the sale. Just how much goes to the troops themselves, however, came up for debate last year when lawsuits between local Girl Scout councils and the GSUSA indicated that a hefty chunk of cookie proceeds go toward funding the GSUSA’s pensions rather than Girl Scout activities. 

Digital Cookie participation will depend on market area, but the GSUSA announced that the “majority” of girl scout councils will be on board for the 2014-2015 cookie season, with more adopting a version 2.0 by the end of 2015. Visit the Digital Cookie site to see if you can buy Girl Scout cookies digitally in your area.

Photo by Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar 

View full post on ReadWrite

3 Lessons in Content Marketing From the Past by @BrianHonigman

Content marketing seems to be all anybody in the marketing world talks about these days. Although it seemingly took the industry by storm overnight, content marketing has actually been around for a very long time. This is partially because content marketing is pretty loosely defined. To paraphrase the Content Marketing Institute’s definition, content marketing is essentially creating something (content can come in many formats) that you think will be of value to a target group in hopes of attracting customers and driving future profitable action. Given that rather nebulous definition, it only makes sense that if you look back at marketing […]

The post 3 Lessons in Content Marketing From the Past by @BrianHonigman appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Using The Past To Predict The Future For Local Search

What does local SEO have in store for us? Columnist Myles Anderson takes a look at how local ranking factors have changed over time.

The post Using The Past To Predict The Future For Local Search appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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An SEM Christmas Carol: Q4 Past, Present & Yet To Come

SEM no longer lives in a vacuum, Columnist Susan Waldes argues. Do you have the resources to thrive in an increasingly complex future?

The post An SEM Christmas Carol: Q4 Past, Present & Yet To Come appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Seo Taiji opens up about past scandal + wishes ex-wife Lee Ji Ah happiness – allkpop

Seo Taiji opens up about past scandal + wishes ex-wife Lee Ji Ah happiness
allkpop
During this episode, the panel carefully asked Seo Taiji about his former wife Lee Ji Ah. Starting at the 0:38 mark in the video above, Seo Taiji opened up about his feelings regarding the scandal, and thought back to when it first broke out. "At that

and more »

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Past, Present, And Future: Why SEO Might Transform, But Will Never Die – Forbes

Past, Present, And Future: Why SEO Might Transform, But Will Never Die
Forbes
Search engine optimization (SEO) has been around for as long as search engines have been popular, but the constantly evolving complexity of search algorithms have digital marketers wondering what's next for their ranking strategies and if they'll even
Does the HTTPS Ranking Update Matter for Your SEO?Business 2 Community

all 2 news articles »

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Google’s Amit Singhal Shares The Top 10 Search Milestones Of The Past Decade by @mattsouthern

Amit Singhal, Google’s head of search, posted about his 14-year work anniversary on Google+ today and also shared what he feels are the 10 biggest Google search milestones since 2004.  In 2004, 4 years after Singhal started working for Google, the company introduced their IPO. They’ve made a range of big bets since then, Singhal says, but the heart of Google is still search. Singhal also shares that there were a whopping 890 improvements to Google Search last year alone, and the company intends to keep moving forward and making things better. “In 2024, the Google of 2014 will seem ancient, […]

The post Google’s Amit Singhal Shares The Top 10 Search Milestones Of The Past Decade by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Google Made 890 Improvements To Search Over The Past Year

In a Google+ post from Google’s head of search, Amit Singhal, Google shares they have made “more than 890 improvements to Google Search last year alone.” In 2009, Google told us they made between 350 to 400 changes to search and in 2010, they said they made 550 improvements to…



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Nest’s Smart Home Ambitions Extend Past The Thermostat With Thread

The smart home, an Internet of Things movement to connect your household appliances, has an ironic problem: communication. Numerous approaches, platforms and standards have sprung up to thoroughly confuse consumers, making it difficult to know which devices can actually talk to each other. 

Google-owned smart thermostat company Nest and its band of partners—Samsung Electronics, Yale Security, Silicon Labs, Freescale Semiconductor, computer processor licensing company ARM and ceiling fan maker Big Ass Fans—think they have a way to make things easier. The companies have joined forces to announce the formation of Thread, a non-profit group established to promote a new wireless networking protocol for the smart home.

The main difference between Thread and other types of smart homes is the technology at its foundation. Although it uses IPv6, an Internet protocol that identifies devices on a network, it doesn’t communicate over Wi-Fi or even Bluetooth. Thread uses 802.15.4, a short-range standard that draws very little power. And for gadgets that use it, such as ZigBee—a common smart home wireless specification— or 6LowPAN, support does not require any changes in hardware. Manufacturers that use ZigBee can make their devices Thread-compliant through a software update. That means even existing gadgets can support Thread. (Nest thermostats already come with a version of Thread support baked in.) 

Nest smart thermostat

Consumers may be uniquely interested in Thread’s mesh networking capabilities. With a mesh network, a smart home wouldn’t require a hub as the intermediary between home devices. That means a glitch in the central hub or a glitchy Wi-Fi network won’t take down your entire smart home. Your devices would still be able to connect with each other, to kick on lights, turn on speakers or unlock your door when you arrive home. 

According to Nest’s Chris Boross, president of Thread, the group aims to solve the interoperability quandary. Plus, Thread uses very little energy and offers tight security, “connecting up to 250 devices” and sealing them using “banking-class encryption.” Security’s a key issue, considering consumer fears over security could hinder smart home adoption. The other is clarity: By seeing Thread compliance listed, consumers could have an easier way to identify devices that work together. 

The battle for wireless standards in the smart home of the future has become intense in 2014. The Open Internet Consortium vows to create the one true wireless standard, with Samsung, Dell and Intel at the fore. So does the AllSeen Alliance, with 51 members led by Qualcomm. The Industrial Internet Consortium features the likes of AT&T and General Electric. Large companies like Samsung belong to several of these industry groups, hedging bets to see which standard emerges on top.

See also: ZigZag Wants To Build A Lingua Franca For The Internet Of Things

It’s a different approach than Apple’s attempt to unify devices. Whether it’s better, however, isn’t clear. Apple’s HomeKit protocol doesn’t inherently restrict itself to certain technologies. Meanwhile Thread works primarily with ZigBee devices, leaving out the other two major smart home specifications, Z-Wave and Insteon, as well as numerous other Wi-Fi-only appliances. That means thousands of products are left out of this loop. So much for communication. 

Feature image courtesy of Flickr user Jeff Wilcox. Inset images courtesy of Flickr user Bit Boy and Thread Group. 

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