Posts tagged less

Bing Rehires Duane Forrester Less Than Two Months After Being Laid Off by @mattsouthern

Not even two months after being laid off, Duane Forrester has announced he’s back at his old position with Bing as the senior project manager in charge of webmaster outreach. Restructuring within Microsoft at the end of October this year led to several top Bing positions being eliminated, including Forrester’s. Judging by the outpouring of support for Forrester there was no doubt he’d land a new job before long, but who could have predicted he’d get his exact same job back in under two months’ time. Following the lay off, Forrester says he considered positions with companies like GoDaddy, eBay, […]

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Open Source: Both Bigger And Less Relevant Than You Imagine

Every so often a study comes along that is so bad—so off the mark—that it’s impossible to ignore. Or, at least, so difficult to understand that different news organizations can walk away with wildly varying understandings of its findings.

Such is the case with the Ponemon Institute’s survey of 1,400 technology professionals, which according to some outlets found big companies “cautious” and “slow” to embrace open source. Others, looking at the exact same data, found respondents “generally positive” to open source. (The survey was sponsored by Zimbra, which provide of open-source messaging and collaboration software.)

The reality, of course, is that both are right, because open source is both hard and easy, depending on where large organizations try to use it.

Open Source For Me Or Thee? It Depends

Open source has climbed in popularity over the past decade. Today, as Cloudera’s Mike Olson posits, “No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form.” If it’s infrastructure, it’s open. From Hadoop to MongoDB, from MySQL to Spark, there are virtually no exceptions to this open source rule.

At the same time, Ponemon’s study finds that, on average, just 30% of business applications used by U.S. firms are open source, a number that drops to 25% in Europe. On one hand, it’s impressive that commercial open source applications have made that much progress in the past decade. It’s also impressive why they’ve turned to open source:

  • %74 of U.S. IT professionals believe that commercial open source software offers better continuity and control; 
  • 66% of IT practitioners in the U.S. feel that commercial open source software means fewer bugs, and 63% believe it will boost quality compared to proprietary software; 
  • The ability to lower costs is no longer the main point of differentiation for open source software, according to IT professionals in the U.S. and EMEA; business continuity, control and quality rank above cost concerns, but all outperform proprietary software in the minds of IT professionals.

All of which is great, but none of this really means open source will dominate business applications any time soon. After all, 65% of those surveyed declared “ease of use” to be their primary consideration in choosing a messaging and collaboration solution (the focus of the survey).

Ease of use is not generally open source’s strength.

Making Software Easy

Instead, open source offers other benefits that trump ease of use. Aspects like flexibility, cost and control drive open-source adoption within enterprise infrastructure. As Gartner analyst Alexander Linden finds, despite the best efforts of proprietary analytics companies, “A lot of innovative data scientists really favor open source components (especially Python and R) in their advanced analytics stack.” 

But these are the über geeks. As I wrote last week, roughly 70% of enterprises still haven’t been able to take off their Big Data training wheels due to the complexity of the technology. For those willing and able to invest in hard-core data scientists with the appropriate technology chops, Big Data is becoming a source of significant competitive differentiation.

For everyone else, however, it’s a bridge too far.

But that’s for cutting-edge Big Data technology. There is a host of other open-source technologies that is broadly used because it’s higher performance, easy (enough) to use and often is cheaper. Things like Linux, Drupal, Nginx and other open-source technologies power millions of enterprises.

Most, however, are embraced and deployed by engineers, not business users.

This is how it has always been, and this is almost certainly how it always will be. Small wonder, then, that “open source companies” no longer tout open source on their websites, preferring to focus on the commercial value they provide on top of open source (polish, packaging, etc.). 

In sum, open source is huge in the enterprise, and counting adoption of open-source applications is a really, truly terrible way to measure that adoption.

Lead photo courtesy of Shutterstock

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Understanding Auction Dynamics: Why More Traffic Can Mean Less Revenue

What’s the relationship between traffic and revenue in SEM? Columnist George Michie explains.

The post Understanding Auction Dynamics: Why More Traffic Can Mean Less Revenue appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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The Psychological Benefits of Simple Design: Why Less Really is More by @shanejones15

It’s a question that marketers and designers ask themselves every day: What is the key to a conversion-based design? And the answer: As little design as possible. According to a 2012 Google study, users consistently rate visually simple websites as more beautiful than their more complex counterparts. Further, highly prototypical sites (or sites with layouts that are commonly associated with sites of its category) with a simple design are considered the most beautiful sites of all. In other words? Simple is beautiful. And beautiful converts. But why? In this article, we’ll explore the concept of simple, prototypical design and examine its role […]

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#Pubcon Las Vegas 2014 is Less Than 2 Weeks Away: What To Look Forward To [SPONSORED] by @mattsouthern

This post is Sponsored by Pubcon Las Vegas – October 6 – 9  in Las Vegas, Nevada. Pubcon Las Vegas is less than two weeks away! Proudly sponsored by Facebook, Pubcon’s 15th anniversary event will be the biggest gathering of search and social media professionals you can expect to see all year. Since 2000, Pubcon has been a must-attend conference according to Forbes, and a “top conference for growing your business” according to Inc. Pubcon has thrived on bringing together the very best in online marketing and SEO from over 130 different countries. This year’s conference will offer a week-long look at the future […]

The post #Pubcon Las Vegas 2014 is Less Than 2 Weeks Away: What To Look Forward To [SPONSORED] by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Apple Is Less Than Inviting To PayPal In Apple Pay

Apple and PayPal have been partners in payments for almost a decade, dating back to a 2004 deal in which Apple started accepting PayPal in the iTunes Music Store.

But Apple left PayPal, which reportedly lobbied to be included in its payment plans, out in the cold in the launch of Apple Pay.

See also: Apple Introduces Apple Pay To Simplify Payments

Apple is recommending that developers integrating Apple Pay into their apps or websites use SDKs, or software-development kits, from one of six payment processors. PayPal and its Braintree Payments subsidiary isn’t one of them—but Braintree archrival Stripe is.

It all but warns off developers from using other services:

Using one of these SDKs is highly recommended. Contact your payment provider for more information.The alternative is to provide your own server-side solution to receive payments from your app, decrypt payment tokens and interface with the payment provider.Handling credit and debit card payments can be complicated and unless you already have the expertise and systems in place, an SDK from a payment provider is the quickest and most reliable way to support Apple Pay in your app.

Stripe, naturally, is gloating about its inclusion, to the point of stretching the truth. An email from its PR agency falsely describes Apple Pay as being “built on Stripe.” That’s not true, of course, and one imagines prideful Apple executives might take offense at the claim. In any event, Stripe was clearly briefed on Apple Pay early and allowed to build interfaces and write documentation available on the day of launch.

PayPal: It’s No Big Deal

PayPal, which has launched its own system for one-touch payments, didn’t get similar treatment.

In an interview with ReadWrite, Bill Ready, CEO of Braintree Payments, did his best to spin PayPal’s omission. He noted that Braintree’s V.zero software, which developers include in apps and websites to accept credit and debit cards, can easily add new forms of payment—as it plans to do with Bitcoin, for example. 

“We can handle these transactions,” Ready told me. “Apple is very clear that you can use your existing payments provider.”

In fact, Braintree will accept Apple Pay payments from Braintree customers that build it into their apps. Uber, for example, is adopting Apple Pay to allow customers to pay for rides with a credit or debit card stores in their iTunes account. 

Here’s how it works: A token—in layman’s terms, a disguised, one-time-use account number—will get passed from Apple to Uber and then to Braintree, where it gets processed like any other card transaction. Braintree has done considerable technical work to handle these tokens.

The Inevitable Downside

The downside for PayPal is that it’s not getting Apple’s official imprimatur, and it hasn’t been allowed to prepare software that simplifies the inclusion of Apple Pay as a payment method in advance. Developers who want to use Apple Pay with Braintree have to figure the integration out on their own—and Apple is basically cautioning them against doing so. 

One other mystery: Apple customers can currently store PayPal as their payment method in their iTunes account to pay for music, videos, and apps. It’s not clear if Apple will let those customers use PayPal at retail stores that accept Apple Pay, or if it will make them use a credit or debit card.

It’s not surprising that Apple and PayPal, once partners, are jockeying for position in retail payments. Apple is focused on the phone, while PayPal wants your payments to be handled in the cloud.

Still, it’s confounding that these two companies, which both claim they want to simply payments for consumers and developers, can’t figure out a way to work together.

Screenshot by Stephanie Chan for ReadWrite

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More Local SEOs Earning Less Than $30,000 [Study]

The BrightLocal Local SEO Industry Survey included nearly 1,800 SEOs and found more than a third of local SEOs have turnover of less than $30,000 and the average local SEO handles nine clients.

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Industry Survey: 37% Of SEOs Saw Less Than $30,000 In Revenue Turnover Since Last Year

According to an industry survey by local search firm BrightLocal, a majority of SEOs experienced less than $30,000 in revenue turnover during the last twelve months, with the average revenue-per-client ranging from $500 to $1,000 for the largest percentage of survey respondents. BrightLocal polled…



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5 Less Common Link Building Mistakes You Might Be Making

Even the most advanced link builders can sometimes make simple mistakes. Are you one of them?

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Sellers Choice Storefronts: Readers Less Satisfied with SEO – EcommerceBytes (blog)


EcommerceBytes (blog)
Sellers Choice Storefronts: Readers Less Satisfied with SEO
EcommerceBytes (blog)
1. Create your own website. I use Weebly but NOT the Shopping Cart option. I do not need all that functionality and monthly cost to sell my unique one of a kind items. 2. Explore cart options and remember for "one of a kind" unique handmade items and

and more »

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