Posts tagged Google’s

Bing Follows Google’s Lead and Launches Shopping Campaigns

Much like Google did last year, Bing is now beta testing shopping campaigns, which give advertisers more sophisticated management and performance tracking capabilities.

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How Google’s Project Fi Could Upend Wireless Service With A Simple Math Trick

This post first appeared on the Ferenstein Wire, a syndicated news service; it has been edited. For inquires, please email author and publisher Gregory Ferenstein.

Google unveiled an ambitious new plan to take on wireless carriers Wednesday with the launch of its own wireless telecom service, Project Fi. Google CEO Larry Page is reportedly frustrated that AT&T and Verizon just haven’t been interested in building better infrastructure. So, he launched his own wireless service — with a twist.

See also: Project Fi Is Google’s Blueprint For The Future Of The Network

Google’s pricing plan seems like a clever math trick to align profits with the incentive to build out more data infrastructure, so that carriers face the right incentives to keep up with demand. Under Google’s pricing, wireless carriers only make money when consumers use data, because consumers are charged exactly for what they use. If a consumer has a $60 6GB data plan and only uses 5.5GB, they only pay $55 for the data.

The math trick is to increase price linearly with data use.

Aligning Profits With Demand 


Unlike most wireless carriers, Google makes most of its money when consumers actually browse the Web. AT&T, Verizon and Sprint profit when users pay for data they never use or accidentally go over their rate allowance.

The upshot is that most wireless carriers have these tricky pricing plans of hidden fees, overage charges, complicated contracts and odd incremental upgrades. (AT&T, for instance, has a 6GB and a 15GB plan—but  nothing in between).

In some instances, these companies benefit from users who consume less data, since they charge more per gigabyte for low rate plans (illustrated in the bottom left side of the graph above).

In other words, these companies have no particular reason to build out their wireless infrastructure in order to keep up with increasing demand. Instead, they’d rather call you a data hog and throttle your connection if you to use more than they think you ought to be using.

See also: How All The Major U.S. Carriers Throttle Your Wireless Data

This odd business strategy reportedly irks Google. The Information’s Amir Efrati reported:

For Google, a mobile offering would fit neatly into CEO Larry Page’s playbook. He hasn’t been shy about discussing with subordinates his disdain for existing wireless carriers and telecom companies who he believes have been much too slow to upgrade their networks and heavy-handed in trying to control the services that subscribers use on their devices.

So, Google is offering monthly data plans: $20 unlimited text/talk and $1 per 100MB of data (i.e., a 2GB data plan will set you back a total of $40, plus taxes). It partnered with both Sprint and T-Mobile, so phones should effortlessly switch to whatever network is best in a given area. Under this grand scheme, there’s no incentive to lock users to a single wireless network or come up with tricky plans aimed at tripping up consumers.

If a consumers uses more data, the carrier has simple incentive to build out faster and more reliable capacity. It’s ambitious in its simplicity. And, if it works, America might actually catch up to the rest of the world with faster, cheaper, mobile broadband.

Lead photo by Ervins Stauhmanis

View full post on ReadWrite

Google’s Search Analytics Report Now Live For More Webmaster Tools Users

Is Google’s Search Queries report missing in Google Webmaster Tools? You may be part of a test where you are seeing the new Search Analytics report.

The post Google’s Search Analytics Report Now Live For More Webmaster Tools Users appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Project Fi Is Google’s Blueprint For The Future Of The Network

We knew it was coming, and now it’s here: Google Fi is the tech giant’s disruptive move into the wireless telecom market. Like many other Google projects before it, from Glass to Loon, it’s both experimental and innovative at the same time.

See also: Google’s Latest (Potential) Disruption: Pay-Per-Gigabyte Wireless Data

The idea is simple: Sign up for Project Fi, and wherever you wander with your phone, it will automatically connect you to the fastest possible network. That could be a Google-approved public Wi-Fi spot; or it could be a 4G LTE link from one of its partners (Sprint and T-Mobile are on board to begin with).

It’s a more advanced, more ambitious version of the cellular/Wi-Fi switching we’ve already seen from Sprint and T-Mobile, functionality that lets you seamlessly swap from one to the other. Google’s new service, promises to be more expansive than ever before.

Project Fi goes beyond switching from Wi-Fi to cellular connections and back again, though. It also incorporates a truly cross-platform experience, where you can (for example) forget your phone at home and still make calls and texts from your work computer.


Project Fi illustration (Source: Google)

Google users can already get to their email, documents, photos and much more by logging into a Web browser, and Fi adds calls and texts to that mix, essentially putting the SIM card in the cloud. It’s a more modern version of Google Voice and from Google’s explainer site it looks like Hangouts is going to act as the backbone to it.

From a company invested in ultra-high-speed broadband and connecting developing parts of the world, Project Fi makes a lot of sense: It’s about making sure smartphone users are on the fastest possible speeds, wherever they are, on whatever device.

Pay-As-You-Go Data


One number lets you make and receive calls from multiple devices.

That “wherever” part of the equation extends across the world as well. Fi users pay $20 a month for talk, text, Wi-Fi tethering and international coverage in 120+ countries, then it’s $10 per gigabyte of data.

An extra $10 a month gets you 1GB of data, $20 gets you 2GB and so on. Any data you don’t use, you get a refund for—so if you pay for 2GB but only use 1GB, then Google will send you back $10 at the end of the month.

Interested? Google is letting users request an invite from the Project Fi site, but at this stage you’re going to need a Nexus 6 to get involved. That’s partly because some advanced circuitry is required for switching between so many types of network across the world. At the same time, Google won’t want to spook the existing networks too much, and limiting the roll-out achieves that.

Like the Nexus program and Google Fiber, Project Fi aims to set an example for others to follow. It’s one of those Google initiatives that makes a lot of sense for users in terms of convenience and ease-of-use, and now the onus is on the rest of the market to respond.

It’s also concerned with breaking down the distinction between Wi-Fi and cellular data, a distinction we may not even recognize in five or ten years. The SIM card had a good run, but its time is coming to an end.

Lead photo courtesy of Shutterstock; other images courtesy of Google

View full post on ReadWrite

Mobilegeddon Begins: Here’s How It’s Going With Rollout Of Google’s Mobile Friendly Update

What to expect when the Google mobile friendly update is released today…

The post Mobilegeddon Begins: Here’s How It’s Going With Rollout Of Google’s Mobile Friendly Update appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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Mobilegeddon Is Today: Here’s How It’s Going With Rollout Of Google’s Mobile Friendly Update

What to expect when the Google mobile friendly update is released today…

The post Mobilegeddon Is Today: Here’s How It’s Going With Rollout Of Google’s Mobile Friendly Update appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

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Google’s ‘phone friendly’ #mobilegeddon causes SEO mass HYSTERIA – Computerworld


Computerworld
Google's 'phone friendly' #mobilegeddon causes SEO mass HYSTERIA
Computerworld
Today's the day Google's new "mobile friendly" search algorithm goes into effect. Simply put, from now on web pages easily viewed by mobiles get placed higher in search results, the others… not so much. So if you happen to hear screams of anguish …

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How to Write For Google’s Impending Mobile Algorithm Update by @JuliaEMcCoy

The Google mobile update is set to affect all websites on a bigger scale than the Panda and Penguin. Learn how you can get your content in shape to prepare.

The post How to Write For Google’s Impending Mobile Algorithm Update by @JuliaEMcCoy appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Mobilegeddon is Here: Google’s Mobile-Friendly Algorithm is Live! by @mattsouthern

Editor’s Note: SEJ founder Loren Baker also contributed to this post. Today, Google launched its long-awaited mobile-friendly algorithm update worldwide, which is estimated to affect a large % of mobile search queries. As more people use their smartphones to browse the internet, this update was made in an effort to provide users with the most relevant and timely results, whether the information is on mobile-friendly web pages or in a mobile app. Today’s update is historical in a number of ways — in fact, it was making history well before it even launched. In an unprecedented move, Google issued a formal warning about […]

The post Mobilegeddon is Here: Google’s Mobile-Friendly Algorithm is Live! by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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