Posts tagged Gets

Zambia Gets Free Facebook Access! (And Internet, Sort Of)

Facebook wants to make sure everyone on the planet can access knowledge, job opportunities—and, of course, create Facebook accounts—through Internet access provided by the social network.

The company announced the Internet.org app on Thursday, a way for people in developing countries to use free data and access Facebook, Google search and other online resources. Through a partnership with telecom provider Airtel, the Internet.org app will be available for free, initially rolling out in Zambia.

The app is part of Facebook’s larger Internet.org initiative to help bring Internet connectivity to parts of the world where data can be cost prohibitive, and Wi-Fi is both expensive and spotty. In many of these regions, the only way people can connect to the Internet is through mobile devices.

Facebook plans to connect the world by deploying things like satellites and drones to power data connectivity in countries like Zambia, and partner with mobile operators like Airtel to provide free services.

This data doesn’t cost Facebook a dime, because Airtel pays for its users’ free access. This partnership works for both companies—if people can use Facebook for free, they’ll likely sign up for an account to stay connected to friends and family, and, when Internet.org users are ready to leave the confines of the free data, Airtel will be able to get more people to pay for it.

If users go outside of the 13 different free websites—say, by clicking on a link in a Facebook post—they’ll be notified that data charges will apply.

People using the Internet.org app aren’t required to have a Facebook account, a Facebook spokesperson told ReadWrite.

“Soon, everyone will be able to use the internet for free to find jobs, get help with reproductive health and other aspects of health, and use tools like Facebook to stay connected with the people they love,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg posted on Facebook.

Of course, not everyone has a mobile device, but certainly everyone with Internet.org app compatibility will be able to benefit from this new partnership.

Subscribers can visit these 13 websites for free:

• AccuWeather

• Airtel

• eZeLibrary

• Facebook

• Facts for Life

• Google Search

• Go Zambia Jobs

• Kokoliko

• MAMA (Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action)

• Messenger

• Wikipedia

• WRAPP (Women’s Rights App)

Lead image by Flickr user fromusing

View full post on ReadWrite

What Banana Republic’s “Startup Guy” Collection Gets All Wrong

Bravo, Banana Republic! We hail your valiant effort to inject some fashion sense into Silicon Valley. And purely from a fashion perspective, your new collection The Startup Guy is pretty on point; the clothes are unquestionably nice.

But we have to talk. It’s kind of tone deaf to try to “disrupt” Silicon Valley fashion without first understanding the culture and style that already permeates techland. Free startup-branded t-shirts, messenger bags, and hoodies are more on par for the real-life “startup guy.”

There’s also your approach to diversity in tech. With two white guys and one Asian male as models, The Startup Guy collection helps perpetuate the notion that there aren’t any women or many minorities beyond Asians in startups. (Neither is true.)

Still, I respect your desire to up SV’s male fashion game.

I scrolled through The Startup Guy collection on my daily ride into the city, and took a moment to close my eyes and imagine what a Caltrain car full of Banana Republic startup guys would look like. In my mind, there were jeans rolled up to the ankles, chunky wool sweaters, and all the loafers filling the seats. It felt a little “finance fratty,” if you get my meaning.

The fact is, people don’t look like this in Silicon Valley. I opened my eyes back into the real world, and it was peppered with backpacks, plaid shirts, and scooters. Your man-purses, salmon shorts, and earth tones would be more at home on a yacht off the Hamptons than they would be on Muni. The straight-out-of-university style rules in San Francisco startup land, and that doesn’t look to be changing anytime soon.

But the biggest problem here might just be the simple idea that you went and named this collection The Startup Guy. That pretty much guarantees that no actual person from a startup will forgo all self-awareness and buy these clothes.

Images courtesy of Banana Republic, illustration by Nigel Sussman and Madeleine Weiss 

View full post on ReadWrite

Nokia X Gets Axed By Microsoft

Adding insult to injury, Microsoft will kill some of the Nokia X Android smartphones that Nokia released earlier this year.

“We plan to shift select Nokia X product designs to become Lumia products running Windows. This builds on our success in the affordable smartphone space and aligns with our focus on Windows Universal Apps,” Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said in an email explaining the 18,000 job cuts coming to Microsoft, including 12,500 from the Nokia division.

See also: Why Microsoft Won’t Immediately Kill The Nokia X Smartphone

Microsoft was never really happy that Nokia built and Android smartphone right before the acquisition of the smartphone manufacturer became official earlier this year. Reports said that Microsoft thought the Nokia Android phone was “embarrassing.”

One source was overheard at a Nokia dinner at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in February saying, “Microsoft is a Windows company.” Nokia twisted the fork on Microsoft a little bit with the Nokia X announcement, even if Microsoft claims to have known the plan all along. That’s why the Nokia X ran Android in the background but utilized Microsoft’s cloud and core services, instead of Google’s.

At least that was the theory.

In conversations with both Microsoft and Nokia executives at various industry events this year, each and every one said that there were no plans to kill the Nokia X series of Android devices.

“Essentially the story is that Microsoft wants to connect the next billion people to the cloud,” said Jussi Nevanlinna, Nokia’s VP of product marketing for smartphones at Nokia before the acquisition, to ReadWrite in an interview in February. “What we bring is very wide reach. We have access to these consumers … We are a volume platform to connect the next billion people to Microsoft’s cloud and services.”

When asked about what Microsoft thinks of the Nokia X smartphone during Mobile World Congress earlier this year, VP of Windows Phone at Microsoft Joe Belfiore hedged his bets.

“We have a terrific engineering relationship with Nokia. What they do as an independent company is what they do. They will do some things we are excited about and some things that we are not excited about,” said Belfiore.

As recently as Microsoft’s Build developer conference in April this year, Nokia VP of marketing for smart devices Hans Henrik Lund unequivocally said that the Nokia X would continue into a second generation.

“Oh absolutely. Of course they will. Because again, it makes sense. Because we can get consumers onto Microsoft services as opposed than potentially going to Google services,” Lund said in an interview with ReadWrite.

New Nokia X devices are unlikely at this point at Microsoft focuses on its Lumia portfolio. In an email announcing the layoffs to the Nokia team, former Nokia CEO and current VP of devices at Microsoft outlined the strategy for device manufacturing going forward.

We will be particularly focused on making the market for Windows Phone. In the near term, we plan to drive Windows Phone volume by targeting the more affordable smartphone segments, which are the fastest growing segments of the market, with Lumia. In addition to the portfolio already planned, we plan to deliver additional lower-cost Lumia devices by shifting select future Nokia X designs and products to Windows Phone devices. We expect to make this shift immediately while continuing to sell and support existing Nokia X products. 

Currently, three sizes of Nokia X Android smartphones running Windows cloud services are on the market around the world.

View full post on ReadWrite

SearchCap: Google Flash Mobile Warnings, Bing Webmaster Communication & Cortana Gets Academic

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: Bing Admits They Need To Do Better With Webmaster Communication In a blog post today on the Bing Webmaster Blog, Bing’s Igor Rondel, Principal Development…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SEO recruiters look for journalists as Google gets fussier – Online Journalism Blog (blog)

SEO recruiters look for journalists as Google gets fussier
Online Journalism Blog (blog)
As online marketing and search engine optimisation (SEO) practices have evolved, journalists have become increasingly sought-after by the agencies that compete to improve their clients' rankings. “For a long time there was a very poor practice in

View full post on SEO – Google News

Android Wear Gets Customized; That Didn’t Take Long

One beautiful aspect about Google’s Android operating system has always been the fact that it allows developers and enthusiasts to customize it with homebuilt versions. Custom ROMs—i.e., operating-system firmware that users can “flash” onto their devices—have been part of Android since nearly the beginning.

Now custom ROMs have now come to Android Wear, Google’s version of the operating system that runs on smartwatches and wearable devices.

Meet Gohma

Android developer Jake Day has released one of the first custom ROMs for the LG G Watch, one of the first two Android Wear watches to hit the market. Day posted the ROM on RootzWiki, an Android news and information site for developers and designers.

The ROM—nicknamed Gohma after a boss in the video game Zelda—is fairly simple. It aims to improve battery life of the LG G Watch, speed up overall performance, reduce lag time between notification cards and increase vibration intensity.

Gohma isn’t a full-blown Android Wear replacement. The ROM abides by the basic user interface design principles of Wear and the LG G Watch will still take over-the-air updates to the operating system from Google and LG (which will wipe out the ROM installation). Day makes sure to note that Gohma is a small release intended to improve performance and to make sure that everything is work well before releasing a fuller version of the ROM at a later date.

Gohma is fairly easy to install. Knowledgeable developers will just need to make sure that the device’s bootloader is unlocked and the ROM script will root the device and itself, allowing for the custom software to be installed.

Unleashing The Community: A Good Thing For Smartwatches

Android Wear generally leaves a lot to be desired. It is Google’s first go at smartwatch software and, initially, it is basically just a notifications device strapped to your wrist. For the time being, that’s perfectly fine as wrist-based notifications are a (surprisingly) pleasant way to receive messages. But Android Wear and smartwatches in general have much more potential than what is currently available.

Part of that is a hardware problem as engineers are naturally limited by the capabilities of currently available processors and sensors. But the hardware in the LG G Watch is almost the equivalent of a 2011 Android smartphone, so it should be able to do much more than the notification cards and voice interaction that is currently available through the initial release of Android Wear.

See also: What Not To (Android) Wear: One Woman’s Search For Smartwatch Bliss

This is where the large community of Android developers has an opportunity to build on top of Wear through custom skins and ROMs to make it a better performing, more functional and attractive device. Day’s Gohma should just the start as the heavy hitters in the Android ROM community—like CyanogenMod—will surely get involved, pushing Android Wear development to further feats of utility and maturation.

The Android developer community doesn’t operate in a vacuum either. Google listens to developers and often implements features and requests that developers have built on their own to work around the limitations of stock Android. The Android development community is essentially one giant sandbox for Google to learn about what app builders and consumers want in the next version of the operating system.

For the last six years, this process has worked well in helping to build ever better versions of Android for smartphones and tablets. Hopefully with the first custom ROM for Android Wear, Google can learn how to build better software for smartwatches as well.

Images: Gohma via HD Wallpaper; Android LG G Watch by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite

View full post on ReadWrite

Seo In Guk gets up close and personal with 1000 fans during his first fan … – allkpop


allkpop
Seo In Guk gets up close and personal with 1000 fans during his first fan
allkpop
In addition, for the "Saranghae U" stage, Seo In Guk invited the winner of his fan event and gave her a back hug as he serenaded her, making both her and every fan in the audience squeal. He also talked about his upcoming tvN drama 'High School King' …

View full post on SEO – Google News

Seo In Guk gets up close and personal with 1000 fans during his first fan … – allkpop


allkpop
Seo In Guk gets up close and personal with 1000 fans during his first fan
allkpop
In addition, for the "Saranghae U" stage, Seo In Guk invited the winner of his fan event and gave her a back hug as he serenaded her, making both her and every fan in the audience squeal. He also talked about his upcoming tvN drama 'High School King' …

View full post on SEO – Google News

GitHub Gets Its Science On

There are a lot of reasons to use GitHub even if you’re not a software developer. For example, if you’re a scientist using the tool for collaborative research and data. 

In a Wednesday blog post, GitHub announced two new user interface updates to better accommodate the needs of researchers and scientists. 

“GitHub is being used today to build scientific software that’s helping find Earth-like planets in other solar systems, analyze DNA, and build open source rockets,” wrote Arfon Smith, leader of the GitHub Science Program. “Seeing these projects and all this momentum within academia has pushed us to think about how we can make GitHub a better tool for research.”

Until now, GitHub repositories couldn’t be cited—at least officially—in academic papers. That’s because they didn’t have Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) until now. A DOI is a unique numerical string that ties metadata and other information to an electronic document so it can be cited. 

The company worked with Mozilla Science Lab and two data archivers, Figshare and Zenodo, to make it possible to add a DOI to any repository. A new guide shows you how to do it. 

The other big change is that now scientists have the ability to make research accounts by tying an academic email address to a repository. The real benefit of a research account is that you can get a GitHub Education Discount, just like students and teachers do.

While it’s apparent that plenty of scientists use GitHub for development, these new changes might make GitHub a more welcoming place for scientists who are less computer savvy. Many people (often even those within GitHub itself) overlook the non-coding ways that GitHub makes a useful tool for collaboration, from editing papers to conducting research. 

At the very least, non-developers will have an easy, academia-friendly way to cite GitHub repositories in their papers.

Lead image by Flickr user Paris Buttfield-Addison, CC 2.0; science meme image courtesy of cheezburger.com

View full post on ReadWrite

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