Posts tagged earnings

Wearables take Fossil earnings back to stone age

close up of hands setting smart watch

Though consumers are still opening their wallets for smartwatches, things are definitely not sunshine and lollipops for Fossil Group which saw its shares plunge more than 30% on poor wearables revenues.

As reported by Investing.com, shares of the Texas-based maker of designer jewelry and smartwatches plummeted in after-hours trading yesterday as it missed analysts’ forecasts for earnings and revenues in the first quarter, and lowered its future outlook.

Revenues were hit by an 11% drop in jewelry sales and an 8% decrease in watch sales. Sales fell by 7% in both Europe and the U.S. from the same quarter last year

In first quarter 2016, Fossil missed expectations of $0.15 per share earnings on $667 million in sales, by posting actual earnings of $0.12 per share on sales of $659.8 million.

Will an Apple leave no Fossil?

Increased competition from Apple’s iWatch significantly ate into sales from its subsidiary Misfit wearables, which had previously been hailed as a growth driver for Fossil. Misfit, which was acquired in fall 2015 for $260 million, propelled Fossil to stronger than expected earnings in Q4 2015.

However, Fossil revealed in its quarterly report that Misfit operations will now be dilutive to its 2016 results.

The poor showing by Misfit and its wearables products led Fossil to play down earlier plans to launch up to 100 new wearables this year.

“While our financial results were in line with our expectations, they were below last year given the persistent headwinds pressuring the traditional watch category and the challenging retail environment, particularly in our wholesale channel,” said Kosta Kartsotis Fossil CEO. “We are disappointed that those headwinds have intensified, which will impact this year’s expectations, despite our further expense management.”

The post Wearables take Fossil earnings back to stone age appeared first on ReadWrite.

View full post on ReadWrite

Why are my earnings down right now?

Four things to explore if your AdSense earnings take a dip

Today we’d like to share some insights about why AdSense earnings sometimes go down — and look at how to troubleshoot what’s going on when that happens. Google has a variety of tools and reports that will help you see what might be causing a decline and how you can respond to optimize your earnings.

One of the first things to consider is: have your overall page views gone down, or are other issues causing the drop? There are many factors that affect revenue, but the key ones to look at include:

  • Clickthrough rate (CTR)
  • Cost per click (CPC)
  • Page revenue per thousand impressions (page RPM)
  • Page views

You can view all these metrics on the Performance reports tab in your AdSense account. Here are a few tips on how to address issues you may discover.

1. My page views have decreased

When troubleshooting changes in page views, it’s a good idea to extend the date range of your reports out to 30 days or more to help identify trends or specific issues. A drop in page views could simply be seasonal; retailers, for instance, tend to see a traffic drop after the holiday season. But a decrease can also be due to a change in your content.

If your traffic has dropped, here are some ways you might increase it:

  • Promote your site with other major sites that cover the same topics.
  • Promote your site through social media, and create a group of interested people who regularly visit your site.
  • Use Google Search Console to make sure your site is being correctly crawled and indexed.
  • Update your site regularly to encourage repeat visitors. You might also want to send out an email or a newsletter about your updates.

2. My cost per click has decreased

CPC is market-driven and depends on factors like advertiser bids on keywords and the CPC values they’re willing to pay. For example, CPC can fall at the beginning of each quarter when marketers are shifting budget. When looking at changes in CPC, it’s a good practice to extend the date range of your reports out to a year. Then:

  • See if you’re using the best-performing ad sizes. Generally, our most successful sizes for CPC and CTR are 720×90, 336×280, 160×600, and the 320×100 mobile banner. Learn more about the most successful ad sizes.
  • Make sure you’re not blocking ads you don’t need to. Blocks on too many advertisers, ad networks, general or sensitive categories will often decrease CPC because there are fewer advertisers in the auction bidding on your inventory. The more inventory your site has access to, the greater the chance that auction pressure will drive up your CPC.
  • Look at how seasonality can affect your advertisers’ bids. For instance, swimsuit advertisers often increase their bids in the early weeks of summer. But if your site caters only to students, you should expect traffic to fall in the summer. Learn more about how the ad auction works for a clearer understanding of how these kinds of changes can impact your earnings.

3. My search rank has dropped

Deeper investigation may show you that your page is not ranked as highly in search results as it once was. The Webmaster Troubleshooter is designed to help you resolve common issues with your site in Google Search and the Google Search Console.

4. My CTR or page RPM has decreased

A drop in CTR or page RPM can be caused by confusing site design or poor targeting. Visitors who see your ads might not click on them because they find them irrelevant, or perhaps they don’t see your ads at all. And that leads to lower earnings.

Here are some best practices to help drive up your CTR and page RPM:

We hope these tips will help you understand exactly what’s happening on your site ― and send your earnings back in the right direction.

Posted by Rachel Barrett

Google AdSense Team

View full post on Inside AdSense

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