Posts tagged drops

Mac “Spotlight” Search Drops Google For Bing; Becomes More Siri-Like In OS X “Yosemite”

It looks like Bing has gained another win with Apple, becoming integrated into a new version of Spotlight in Apple’s forthcoming Mac OS X “Yosemite” operating system. Spotlight will also tap into a wide-range of search resources similar to how Siri works on iOS. During…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Google Drops Authorship Rich Snippets From Search Results. A Bug?

For the past 20 minutes, if you search anything on Google, the authorship images, where it shows a picture of the individual who wrote the content shown in the Google results, no longer shows up. Here is a picture of what a search results look like with authorship images (was documented yesterday):…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SearchCap: MetaFilter Filtered By Google, RetailMeNot Debates Panda Reports & Google Drops Authorship

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: Google Drops Authorship Rich Snippets From Search Results. A Bug? For the past 20 minutes, if you search anything on Google, the authorship images, where it shows…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Yahoo7 Australia Drops Ripoff Report From Search Results After Defamation Complaints

Yahoo7, the Australian version of Yahoo, has de-indexed Ripoff Report after receiving “significant complaints” about defamatory content showing in its search results. As you see above, a site:ripoffreport.com on Yahoo7 produces no results. A Yahoo7 spokesperson gave us this statement on…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SearchCap: Matt Cutts On Links, Spiderman Drops Bing & DuckDuckGo’s New Design

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: DuckDuckGo Releases New Beta Site With Redesigned Look & Added Features DuckDuckGo. the search engine known for protecting the privacy of its users,…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

SearchCap: Reactions To AdWords Not Provided, Google Drops Video Images & IAB Report

Below is what happened in search today, as reported on Search Engine Land and from other places across the web. From Search Engine Land: 10 Surprising Facts About “Keyword (Not Provided)” For Paid Search Earlier this week, everyone went bananas over a rumor that paid search query data was…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Facebook Drops $19 Billion To Snatch Up WhatsApp

Facebook, which has long been on the prowl for the “next Instagram,” appears to have found it. The social network will shell out roughly $19 billion[*] to acquire WhatsApp, the giant global messaging app, in a deal that puts the world’s largest social network together with its biggest independent person-to-person messaging system.

[*] Updated purchase price to $19 billion to account for $3 billion in stock grants to WhatsApp founders and employees that vest over four years.

In a press release, Facebook said WhatsApp will continue to operate independently, much the way Instagram—the photo-sharing service Facebook acquired for $1 billion almost two years ago—does.

Go Mobile, Social Network

The acquisition is clearly intended to further bolster Facebook’s relevance in mobile. While the social network has successfully retooled itself into a mobile powerhouse over the past year, its attempts to jump into the burgeoning global messaging market have never really taken off.

Facebook Home, its attempt to turn Android phones into Facebook phones, appears to have mostly died a gruesome death. Facebook Messenger, the social network’s attempt to compete directly with WhatsApp and its rivals with a standalone app, hasn’t exactly been a standout.

WhatsApp, by contrast, has been on a long hot streak. According to the release, more than 450 million people use the service each month, 70% of whom are active on any given day. WhatsApp is adding more than a million registered users every day.

In April, WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum said the company was processing 20 billion messages a day—eight billion inbound and 12 billion outbound. That’s more than double what analysts believed Facebook’s message volume at the time to be. In the release, Facebook said WhatsApp is almost as popular as all carrier-based texting services combined; its message volume, Facebook said, is “approaching the entire global telecom SMS volume.”

Another Mobile Arrow In Facebook’s Quiver

By joining Facebook as as an independently run service, WhatsApp may fit easily with the social network’s current strategy of breaking out many of its services into standalone apps—some of them duplicative. After all, Facebook offers both Instagram and its own Facebook Camera as photo apps, so it can’t do much harm to have multiple messaging apps as well.

Over time, it’s entirely possible that Facebook will make WhatsApp work more readily with Messenger, such as by letting the apps access users’ contact lists on both services. In a blog post, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that because Messenger and WhatsApp service “serve such different and important uses,” the company will continue investing in and improving both services.

A bigger question is whether Facebook will try to bring ads to WhatsApp, as it’s done recently with Instagram. WhatsApp has long defiantly resisted advertising, instead charging users 99 cents a year for its service (although Android users get a free year up front). As for the future, CEO Koum issued this promise in a blog post:

Here’s what will change for you, our users: nothing.

WhatsApp will remain autonomous and operate independently. You can continue to enjoy the service for a nominal fee. You can continue to use WhatsApp no matter where in the world you are, or what smartphone you’re using. And you can still count on absolutely no ads interrupting your communication. There would have been no partnership between our two companies if we had to compromise on the core principles that will always define our company, our vision and our product.

Koum, by the way, will be joining Facebook’s board.

Facebook and Google have both reportedly taken passes at WhatsApp in the past. Just over a year ago, in fact, WhatsApp took the unusual step of denying a report that it was then in discussions with Facebook.

Lead image by Madeleine Weiss for ReadWrite

View full post on ReadWrite

Facebook Drops $16 Billion To Snatch Up WhatsApp

Facebook, which has long been on the prowl for the “next Instagram,” appears to have found it. The social network will shell out roughly $16 billion to acquire WhatsApp, the giant global messaging app, in a deal that puts the world’s largest social network together with its biggest independent person-to-person messaging system.

In a press release, Facebook said WhatsApp will continue to operate independently, much the way Instagram—the photo-sharing service Facebook acquired for $1 billion almost two years ago—does.

Go Mobile, Social Network

The acquisition is clearly intended to further bolster Facebook’s relevance in mobile. While the social network has successfully retooled itself into a mobile powerhouse over the past year, its attempts to jump into the burgeoning global messaging market have never really taken off.

Facebook Home, its attempt to turn Android phones into Facebook phones, appears to have mostly died a gruesome death. Facebook Messenger, the social network’s attempt to compete directly with WhatsApp and its rivals with a standalone app, hasn’t exactly been a standout.

WhatsApp, by contrast, has been on a long hot streak. According to the release, more than 450 million people use the service each month, 70% of whom are active on any given day. WhatsApp is adding more than a million registered users every day.

In April, WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum said the company was processing 20 billion messages a day—eight billion inbound and 12 billion outbound. That’s more than double what analysts believed Facebook’s message volume at the time to be. In the release, Facebook said WhatsApp is almost as popular as all carrier-based texting services combined; its message volume, Facebook said, is “approaching the entire global telecom SMS volume.”

Another Mobile Arrow In Facebook’s Quiver

By joining Facebook as as an independently run service, WhatsApp may fit easily with the social network’s current strategy of breaking out many of its services into standalone apps—some of them duplicative. After all, Facebook offers both Instagram and its own Facebook Camera as photo apps, so it can’t do much harm to have multiple messaging apps as well.

Over time, it’s entirely possible that Facebook will make WhatsApp work more readily with Messenger, such as by letting the apps access users’ contact lists on both services. In a blog post, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that because Messenger and WhatsApp service “serve such different and important uses,” the company will continue investing in and improving both services.

A bigger question is whether Facebook will try to bring ads to WhatsApp, as it’s done recently with Instagram. WhatsApp has long defiantly resisted advertising, instead charging users 99 cents a year for its service (although Android users get a free year up front). As for the future, CEO Koum issued this promise in a blog post:

Here’s what will change for you, our users: nothing.

WhatsApp will remain autonomous and operate independently. You can continue to enjoy the service for a nominal fee. You can continue to use WhatsApp no matter where in the world you are, or what smartphone you’re using. And you can still count on absolutely no ads interrupting your communication. There would have been no partnership between our two companies if we had to compromise on the core principles that will always define our company, our vision and our product.

Koum, by the way, will be joining Facebook’s board.

Facebook and Google have both reportedly taken passes at WhatsApp in the past. Just over a year ago, in fact, WhatsApp took the unusual step of denying a report that it was then in discussions with Facebook.

We’ll be updating this story as we learn more.

View full post on ReadWrite

Google Search Redesigns Stock Quotes “Card,” Drops Competitor Links, Then Brings Them Back

Yesterday, Google launched a new design of the stock quotes “card” at the top of its search results. The new card dropped links to competing financial websites, something Google previously had in place since 2000. But after attention was drawn to the fact, Google quietly restored the…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Google Drops $3.2B On Nest: Data Grab Or The Googlization Of The Smart Home

Within minutes of Google announcing plans to buy Nest—the connected home products company known for its smart (and attractive) thermostats and smoke alarms—people immediately started wondering if the tech giant is developing its own smart home. 

Makes sense. Judging by the Consumer Electronics Show, connected home technologies are the new black for 2014. And Google has the deep pockets to really push ahead in that area. Indeed, it just blew $3.2 billion dollars on the Palo Alto, Calif., home-gadget maker.

The deal may not be as out-of-the-blue as it appears. Last month, Google was rumored to be developing a smart thermostat of its own. And the company’s independent investing division, Google Ventures, was already an investor in Nest

Given Google’s recent moves—from making default Gmail settings to allow contact from Google Plus users, to forcing YouTube viewers to use the social network to comment—the situation begs a few jokes (“Will Google now force people to sign into Google Plus just to turn down their heat?”). That’s fair. What may be less laughable for Nest customers is the prospect of all of their data being scooped up by Google.

Nest quickly hit the Web to promise that its data won’t become a free-for-all info buffet for the data-hungry Google machine (see below), but it’s too early to tell what may ultimately happen once the deal finally goes through. 

Will Nest customer data be shared with Google?

Our privacy policy clearly limits the use of customer information to providing and improving Nest’s products and services. We’ve always taken privacy seriously and this will not change.

One thing that seems certain is that Nest will still do business as its own entity. Its head, Tony Fadell (you may recognize the name; he essentially designed Apple’s iconic iPod) will stay on as CEO. 

Stay tuned for further insight into whether this purchase was just a massive data grab, a genuine step down the path leading to an actual Google connected home someday—or perhaps both.

View full post on ReadWrite

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2014, DC2NET All rights reserved