Posts tagged Doing

Got A Mobile Strategy? You’re Probably Doing It Wrong

Your mobile strategy is all wrong. 

Perhaps “all” is too strong a word. If you even have one, you’re already ahead of the game. Less than a third of North American companies have a mobile strategy that goes out at least 12 months, according to a new Econsultancy/Adobe survey

But for many of those organizations, that strategy often begins and ends with “fitting our website into a mobile app,” or goes only a few steps further, showing some key functionality within a mobile app. Neither is enough. 

See also: Why Retail Beacons Still Have A Long Way To Go

No, as Intercom vice president Paul Adams declares, the most effective strategies aren’t necessarily “mobile first.” They tend to revolve around customer experience more than any blind attempt to capture mobile devices. Translation: The optimal way to build a mobile experience is to define what the overall experience should be first, then figure out how mobile can help. 

Mobile … Last?

With 90% of the world’s population over six years of age destined to have a phone by 2020, it’s not surprising that businesses have woken up to the need to reach a mobile audience. Indeed, most companies now at least pay lip service to mobile. 

According to the Econsultancy/Adobe survey, just 31% of companies in North America claim to have a mobile strategy (34% in Europe). Meanwhile, a collective 69% don’t even have one: 


Source: Adobe

At least some claim they’re working on it, though it’s not exactly clear what those strategies will include. 

For many, as Paul Adams stresses, the answer is to focus on “mobile first.” That’s not necessarily the right strategy. (In and of itself, it’s not really a strategy at all.) “If ‘mobile’ is our future, why are almost all the most successful mobile driven businesses building web apps designed for larger screens?” he asks. 

He’s referring to Uber, Waze, and other “mobile-only” apps that now also reach out to computer screens. Granted, the argument is not quite fully formed or very persuasive on its own—Uber still requires a mobile phone to actually hail a car, for example—but it does suggest that the complete user experience encompasses more than just smartphones.

What Are You Trying To Do?

Adams argues that sound mobile strategies require companies to figure out the “job-to-be-done.” This is very much a Clayton Christensen idea, a core concept espoused by Harvard’s innovation and business expert. It basically boils down to figuring out what jobs your customers are trying to accomplish. 

This is the framework within which Adams suggests we’re doing it all wrong:

[W]e’ve been looking at “mobile” using the wrong frame of reference. For years I’ve pushed the idea that “mobile” is not about devices, it’s about access to consuming and publishing information. For me, obsessing about specific devices was a bad path (they change too frequently), obsessing about iOS versus Android OS was a bad path (they are both important) and obsessing about phone versus tablet was a bad path (they have merged into one larger category of portable screen and continue to evolve all the time). Information via screens not devices – this is the key idea.

But it’s not just about gadget choice or screen size. It’s also a matter of convenience. For example, in a recent panel conversation, John Bollen, chief digital officer for MGM Resorts International, talked about how a mobile app is a poor fit for its clientele, given that people visit Las Vegas every two years on average. Forcing them into downloading an app for that brief experience doesn’t make sense, so has invested in responsive websites instead. 

Of course, he acknowledges that apps are exactly right in other contexts—as our check-in kiosks, check-out attendants and other screens. But rather than being fixated on a default “mobile first” model, he’s focusing on specific ways mobile can improve his customers’ experience.

Zeroing In On The Best Screen For The Job

Customers increasingly expect to get information, or have a particular experience, right now. That immediacy practically demands mobile. As Forrester analyst Ted Schadler told me, “Mobile is the ability to get what you want, on the device of your choice, in the immediate moment you need it.” 

See also: Why Your Private Cloud Will Fail

The important consideration is whether you should offer only one way to interact with your brand, and generally the answer will be “no.” 

For example, I’m unlikely to order my Dominos pizza from an Apple Watch, but I’d love the ability to track my pizza’s delivery to my house on it. I can see myself ordering an Uber and tracking it on a watch, but I wouldn’t ever want my phone to be my only means of authoring and reading email. 

On this note, Adams cautions that we need to “think about the screen best suited for input, and the screen best suited for output.” Sometimes mobile will be the answer. Sometimes not. It depends on what the customer wants to do. 

Lead photo by Jason Howie, chart courtesy of Adobe

View full post on ReadWrite

10 Things You Are Not Doing in Google Analytics by @bonirulzz

Learn 10 Google Analytics Features/ Reports that you may not be using to generate insights for your website or online store.

The post 10 Things You Are Not Doing in Google Analytics by @bonirulzz appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

SEO best practices: What not to do (and what you should start doing now) – The Globe and Mail


The Globe and Mail
SEO best practices: What not to do (and what you should start doing now)
The Globe and Mail
Search engine optimization (SEO) has been in a constant state of evolution since its inception. Many old-school tactics that once brought traffic now have the opposite effect. This post focuses on what drives high traffic to websites after the demise
'Right to be forgotten', one year on: It's a minefield for the private individualPR Week

all 2 news articles »

View full post on SEO – Google News

7 Pointless Content Marketing Efforts You Should Stop Doing Today by @JuliaEMcCoy

Julia takes a look at some of the worst ways to waste your time in content marketing. Avoid these to be successful and goal-oriented with your content.

The post 7 Pointless Content Marketing Efforts You Should Stop Doing Today by @JuliaEMcCoy appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Tumblr Marketing: 10 Examples of Effective Brands Doing It Right by @albertcostill

Here are a handful of tips to keep in mind when tinkering around with Tumblr marketing.

The post Tumblr Marketing: 10 Examples of Effective Brands Doing It Right by @albertcostill appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

7 Reasons to Outsource SEO Instead of Doing It Yourself – Business 2 Community

7 Reasons to Outsource SEO Instead of Doing It Yourself
Business 2 Community
Search engine optimization has undergone a massive evolution over the past several years. The services you would have bought from an SEO agency or consultant a decade ago would have looked markedly different than what you would buy today.

View full post on SEO – Google News

Google Still Doing At Least 1 Trillion Searches Per Year

Company is sticking with figure it gave in 2012 but stresses it’s “over” that amount. How much over, Google’s not saying.

The post Google Still Doing At Least 1 Trillion Searches Per Year appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Marriott Will Let You Use Your Own Wi-Fi, Like It’s Doing You A Favor


Marriott hotels will no longer interfere with their guests’ personal Wi-Fi hotspots, the hotel chain announced Wednesday. That includes within the confines of the company’s lucrative convention and trade-show spaces, where it’s charged attendees anywhere between $250 and $1,000 per device for Internet access.

“Marriott International listens to its customers, and we will not block guests from using their personal Wi-Fi devices at any of our managed hotels,” the company posted in the news center on its website.  

See also: How This Hotel Made Sure Your Wi-Fi Hotspot Sucked

Of course, hearing your customers gets a whole lot easier when blocking Wi-Fi access results in hefty fines, something Marriott knows about first hand. The hotel chain paid out $600,000 to the Federal Trade Commission in October, after customers complained about blocked Wi-Fi at its Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center in Nashville.

Prior to receiving the fine, Marriott and the American Hotel & Lodging Association trade group joined forces to file a petition asking for FCC-approved permission to block Wi-Fi access on hotel properties. Marriott attempted to “clarify” its intentions earlier in January, no doubt inspired by the ongoing stink raised by Internet companies and consumer rights groups. 

Marriott Cares About You—Really

According to Marriott’s New Year’s statement, guest safety was the hotel chain’s primary concern. The hotel chain said it welcomed guests to use their Internet connectivity devices while in the privacy of their rooms. Those used in its public spaces during events however, “pose a security threat to meeting or conference attendees or cause interference to the conference guest wireless network,” the company said.  

Large gatherings of corporate and government officials are inviting to cyber spies, security experts have found. Bad guys do use deceptively named Wi-Fi networks and false software updates to trick hotel guests into exposing their computers. These malefactors, however, are usually exploiting vulnerabilities within hotel networks and the gullibility of uneducated Internet users. So Marriott’s argument against personal Wi-Fi devices doesn’t hold up. 

That doesn’t mean Marriott intends to drop the argument. As well as agreeing not to block personal WiFi access at its establishments—a practice for which its already been fined—Marriott’s joint petition with the FCC with the American Hotel & Lodging Association is still pending. 

“We will continue to look to the FCC to clarify appropriate security measures network operators can take to protect customer data, and will continue to work with the industry and others to find appropriate market solutions that do not involve the blocking of Wi-Fi devices,” Marriott said in its Wednesday statement. 

If you’ve got something to say to the FCC about the petition  to block personal Wi-Fi access, you can do that here on the FCC website. 

Photo by National Society of Professional Engineers

 

 

 

 

   

View full post on ReadWrite

Doing It Dave’s Way: 6 #Marketing Lessons From The Founder of Wendy’s #SEJBookClub by @dantosz

For the November edition of #SEJBookClub, we read “Dave’s Way”, written by Wendy’s founder and spokesperson Dave Thomas. The book was originally published in 1991 and chronicles Dave’s life through his childhood, military service, and all the way through building his very successful company. Although Dave passed away in 2002, his legacy is still going strong. Here are a few statistics about Wendy’s you might not have known:  In the first seven years, over 500 Wendy’s restaurants were opened! In 1999, Wendy’s was the third largest hamburger chain, but by 2012, Wendy’s squeezed Burger King out and took second place. As of November 2014, the company was valued […]

The post Doing It Dave’s Way: 6 #Marketing Lessons From The Founder of Wendy’s #SEJBookClub by @dantosz appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

12 Things You Should be Doing Right Now for Semantic Search by @searchlabs

Semantic search. You’ve heard of it, you’ve researched it and you’re probably wondering what to do about it. Black hat, white hat, and everything in between could soon be a thing of the past, as semantic search forces the industry to revert back to the question: What does the user want? It’s a simple concept, but one that has been lost in a whirlwind of advice, speculation, and see-what-sticks techniques. Semantic search gives the industry a chance to go back to basics and provide information rather than force it. Let’s take a look at how to embrace semantics. Think Like […]

The post 12 Things You Should be Doing Right Now for Semantic Search by @searchlabs appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2015, DC2NET All rights reserved