Posts tagged Create

Feeling Uncomfortable: The Way to Create Amazing Content via @Buffer by @kevanlee

We have dozens of ways to measure a successful blog post or social media update, and I’d imagine you’re familiar with all of them. You can track blog traffic by digging into analytics. You can view engagement data on every update you send. The measurable aspects of an ideal blog post and social update are substantial. What about the immeasurable elements? These are the elements that you can’t really quantify, which might be why they don’t receive the same emphasis. It’s hard to pitch a story to an editor based on a feeling you have. It’s easier to point to numbers than to intuition.  This line of thinking extends to […]

The post Feeling Uncomfortable: The Way to Create Amazing Content via @Buffer by @kevanlee appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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How to Create Successful Local SEO Campaign – Business 2 Community

How to Create Successful Local SEO Campaign
Business 2 Community
Enhancing your local business through SEO can be extremely confusing and equally daunting. A lot of efforts should be implemented if a successful local SEO campaign must be undertaken. To some point, profound knowledge and experience will be …

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Best of both worlds: How to create a long-tail SEO strategy for social media … – The Next Web

Best of both worlds: How to create a long-tail SEO strategy for social media
The Next Web
Ever find it difficult to rank for relevant keywords in search or gain traction on social? Most marketers have faced the challenge of getting their business to stand out amongst the chatter. It's a marketer's job to really understand how each

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How to Create a Social Media Friendly Landing Page

The same psychology that applies to crafting an engaging social media post should apply to the pages those posts lead to. Each social channel has its own culture and language. Your landing pages must match that, and present one simple call to action.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Friday Fun: Create Your Own Obnoxiously Simple Messaging App Just Like Yo

You’ve heard about Yo, the bare-minimum messaging app that does nothing but send your friends a “Yo” message with just one tap. In its wake have come OyYo, Hodor, and others. 

Bare-bones messaging is all the rage, because, let’s face it, actually composing a message made up of original words you think up in your head is a lot of work.

The sheer fatuousness of these apps has riled people up. While others pondered why anyone would sully the world by creating Yo and its ilk, we had a different question: How hard is it to code a simple messaging app that just sends a predetermined phrase?

There was only one way to find out.

We had to build our own annoying messaging app.

Meet One Click Message, a Yo-like app built with the help of Matt Makai, a developer evangelist at Twilio.

 I used text messaging rather than push notifications because text is a universal, sure-fire way to annoy your friends without requiring them—as Yo does—to download an app.

I wrote the app in Python, an English-like programming language ideal for beginner developers who want to make something silly while working with Python. It took all of 29 lines of code. 

Here’s a tutorial to help you follow along with the process, so you can see how easy it is for anyone to build a simple Yo clone.

One Click Message is a Web app, not a phone app, but it still texts anyone you want. When you build it, you select a word or phrase that you’d like to send in one click. Mine rickrolls people with Rick Astley lyrics.

And when your friends text you back, you can display all their exasperated replies like trophies right there on your Web app. (Note to self: I may need to get a lawyer soon. Or new friends.)

There’s very minimal coding required to get this off the ground. While I’ll walk you through how I wrote the app, you don’t have to redo the raw coding. Instead, you can copy my work—feel free!—by cloning my GitHub repository, where I stored the source code for the very small, simple program.

Want your own? Here’s how to do it in just ten steps.

1) Sign Up For Twilio

Twilio is a company that makes developer-friendly set of tools for creating text and voice applications. Twilio lets you call and text your own phone number for free and charges three fourths of a penny for calls and text messages to any other phone.

When you sign up, Twilio will give you a phone number (this is what our app will use to text your friends) and API credentials (this is what will allow our app to access our account). I’ve blurred mine out because you should never share these with anybody!

2) Upgrade Your Twilio Account

In my previous tutorial, My Fish Just Sent Me A Text Message, we used Twilio for free, because I was just sending texts to myself. But for a messaging app, we’re going to want to be able to text other people too, so we’re going to have to upgrade our Twilio account by paying for it.

Twilio uses a credit card on file to bill you, but if you add $5 to your account, that’s enough to send and receive about 666 texts on your app—plenty for an experiment like this.

Why pay for texts? Twilio is one of the easiest ways I’ve found to integrate messaging into your development projects, and carriers charge for every text message anyway. It’s hard to find a similar service that’s both free and flexible.

I promise this is the first and last time you’ll have to fork over money for this tutorial. Let’s move on to another tiered free-to-pay tool, of which we’ll be using just the free part…

3) Sign Up For Nitrous.io

There are a lot of options for spaces where you can build and host your own online app. When I built a random non-sequitur Twitter bot, I used Heroku. This time I’m using one of Heroku’s competitors, Nitrous.io. They’re both development environments and online hosts for apps. This means you don’t have to think about setting up your own server—you can just run your code and go.

Why choose one Web-based app builder over another? In this case, I chose Nitrous because it launched with Twilio functionality already built in. Using a different service might mean having to write more code, and I wanted to do the least amount of work possible here.

Sign up with an email and wait for Nitrous.io to email you your confirmation.

4) Create A New “Box” For Your Code

On Nitrous.io, you build and host apps by putting them in different repositories, or as Nitrous calls them, boxes. A free account earns you one box. That’s plenty.

Once you’re signed up with Nitrous, go to your dashboard and click the orange button that says “New Box.” Ours is a Python app, so select “Python/Django.”

Don’t worry about the unusual name Nitrous.io will assign you. It does so to make sure every box has a unique name. Because it’s so easy to create new boxes, Nitrous has to make sure it has lots of names available and they don’t repeat.

Finally, at the bottom where it says, “Download a GitHub repo,” you’ll want to select my One Click Message repository by typing in https://github.com/laurenorsini/one-click-message.git.

Take a moment here, if you like, to look at my code. I use Flask, a microframework for Python, which adds new usability to Python in a number of different ways. For the purposes of this project, we’re focusing on Flask’s ability to simplify integrating Web-based forms with the Python language. In this case, it’s a form that collects your friend’s phone number and passes it on to Twilio, which in turn sends out your designated annoyance text.

Why use a microframework instead of just writing it all myself in Python? Because it’s another opportunity to write less code than we have to. Instead of writing lines of code to bridge the gap between Web forms and Python functions, we just call Flask in to do our dirty work.

When you’re done, it should look like this:

5) Set up the Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

When your box is created, there will be a new orange button below it that says IDE. An IDE, or integrated development environment, is just a place where you can work on code. Click it. You’re now in the part of Nitrous that lets you examine and edit your app’s code.

There are a couple of panels here. To the left is the file hierarchy. If you click on “Workspace,” you’ll see the GitHub repository “one-click-message” populated beneath it. To the right is the chat. I usually just close that, because I’m working on this myself rather than with coding partners. 

In the center is where you edit files. And the entire bottom half of the screen is the console, where you test and deploy programs.

Let’s go down to that bottom screen now. First, we need to install the Twilio API like this:

pip install twilio

This is one of the benefits of using Nitrous. Because we selected its Python option, pip, a program which helps install new Python code, is already installed.

Next, we’re going to install Flask, the framework that adds additional functionality to Python programs. Remember how our finished app allows you to input a phone number? While Twilio is adding messaging functionality, Flask makes it possible to build responsive Python forms.

pip install flask

Now you’ve got all the tools you need in your IDE to get this project going.

6) Add Your Twilio Identication to App.py

If you look inside the one-click-message folder, you’ll see that there are six files in it, not counting images. Two of these, form.html and messages.html inside the Templates folder, make up the visual Web pages that you see when you interact with the app. The cascading style sheet, form.css, is what makes them look pretty.

But the glue holding the entire project together is a Python script named app.py. This is the only part of the project you actually have to alter in order to get it to function.

Inside app.py, I’ve inserted comments about what certain parts of the program do. The part you need to pay attention to right now is:

client = TwilioRestClient ('ABC', '0123') 

twilio_number = "+1234567890" 

Fill in your Twilio credentials on the first line, and your Twilio phone number on the second. With these lines, we’re telling the program how to talk to Twilio’s application programming interface, and whose account to use.

7) The Fun Part: Add Your Message

Maybe it’s a stupid joke. Maybe it’s a really long string of words you text to people frequently and are tired of writing out. Maybe it’s a really long stupid joke. Either way, you’re going to want to put it in on this line in app.py:

client.messages.create(to=formatted_number, from_ = twilio_number, body = "Message of your choice.") 

As you can see, it’s easy enough to change the message by going back into app.py and adjusting this line. So just put something fun for now.

Note to out-of-United-States tutorial readers: This is also where you would want to customize the program with your country code.

formatted_number = "+1" + number

I’ve told the program to add “+1” to any number inputted in the app because I’m in the US and so are the people I plan to text. But it may be different for you.

Finally, don’t forget to save the newly edited app.py!

8) Run Python

OK, we’re getting close to finishing up! Go back to the console at the bottom and navigate to the folder where app.py lives like this:

cd workspace

cd one-click-message

cd is a command that stands for “change directory.” We’re changing from our main directory to the one where app.py is so we can run app.py.

Here’s how you actual run it:

python app.py

If you are in the right directory, the IDE should spit back something like this:

 * Running on http://0.0.0.0:3000/                                                                                                  

 * Restarting with reloader  

9) Preview Your App

With Python still running, go to the navigation bar at the top of the IDE and select Preview: Port 3000. We want the public port 3000, not the SSL (secure socket layer) option.

Your app should open up in another window, like this!

10) Get Texting!

Try out your new app by texting your own phone number. Don’t forget, you need to put it in like this: 1234567890, not like this: (123) 456 – 7890 for it to work. (It wouldn’t be hard to add a few more lines that match patterns by using a library like python-phonenumbers, but for simplicity, I skipped that.)

After you hit send, try sending a reply text, and refresh the page. This will probably be the least-irritated response you’ll get!

How the ReadWrite team replied to my app. 

Text your friends, or share the app’s address with them and trick them into texting themselves.

Have fun! And if you get somebody to invest a million bucks in your obnoxious one-click messaging app, that’s just icing on the cake.

Lead photo by Jhaymesisviphotography

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How To Create A Website With Maximum SEO Potential – Forbes


Dentistry IQ
How To Create A Website With Maximum SEO Potential
Forbes
While it's usually possible to effectively optimize an existing website, it's generally most efficient to build the necessary SEO components into the site design and architecture right from the get-go. Whether you're hiring a designer, using a pre
9 tactics for growth hacking your dentist SEO and SMO strategyDentistry IQ
How to Track the Success of your Email Campaign in Google AnalyticsSearch Engine People (blog)

all 3 news articles »

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8 Ways YouTube Will Be Changing How You Create Videos

YouTube may face some challenges as it moves toward the mainstream, but it isn’t standing still on the technological side. Here are eight new tools for video creators YouTube execs Matthew Glotzbach and Oliver Heckmann—the site’s director of product management and VP of engineering, respectively—previewed at the unofficial YouTube convention VidCon last week.

A few are available now, but most are are still coming attractions. Keep your eyes peeled, YouTubers.

1. Sound Effects

YouTube’s Audio Library already featured hundreds of free songs; now it also includes an array of royalty-free sound effects—perfect for the creator who needs a blood-curdling scream or machine gun fire. The company is also adding more music tracks, though it didn’t say how many.

2. 60 FPS Video

Most YouTube videos play at the standard film-projection rate of 24 frames per second—typically just fast enough to trick a viewer’s brain into seeing motion instead of a succession of still images. YouTube will soon be supporting higher frame rates of 48 fps and 60 fps in order to better capture action from video-game footage shot at higher frame rates.

YouTube has uploaded three videos that preview the new HFR (high frame rate) mode; you can check them out here. (Though be careful out there, creators; remember the grief director Peter Jackson took from some critics when he released the first Hobbit movie in 48 fps.)

3. Creator Studio App

A new Creator Studio app gives creators mobile access to their analytics, which help them better understand the audience drawn by each video, as well as video-management functions. The app is available on Android and will be launching on iOS in “coming weeks.”

4. Playlists

Although the execs’ description was a little vague, creators are apparently going to get “new ways” to create video playlists designed to draw in fans.

5. Creator Credits

Lots of creators collaborate in making YouTube videos, but it’s not easy for viewers to track down the video history of individual collaborators in a video. Creator Credits aims to fix that by letting creators tag their collaborator friends on videos so that viewers can click through to discover new channels. Credits will also allow users to search for different creators based on their work and location. 

6. Fan-Contributed Subtitles 

Viewers will soon be able to submit their own translations of video subtitles or captions for videos that use them.

7. Info Cards

Info cards will help cleanly organize text in video, replacing YouTube’s older annotation format. Creators will be able to program Info cards once to work across desktops, phones, and tablets.

8. Fan Funding

YouTube is adding its own way for fans to support their favorite YouTube celebrities as an alternative to KickStarter, IndieGogo and Patreon. A “Support” button now being tested on channels such as The Young Turks will let viewers donate money directly to video creators via Google Wallet.

YouTube—Now On Satellite Radio

In addition to these new features, the video site is also launching The YouTube 15, a weekly show on SiriusXM Hits 1. Hosted by creator Jenna Marbles, the show will feature YouTube’s rising music stars. 

 

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How to Create Content For “Boring” Businesses by @matt_secrist

Part I—Topic Development Let’s face it, not every business is exciting. A pay parking lot, a dry cleaners, and an insurance agency are just a few examples of businesses that may elicit more “ohs” than “ooohs” when you tell someone you work there. Boring or otherwise, every business needs a steady stream of prospects. In today’s world, online content is a primary means by which customers find and choose companies to do business with. This can be in the form of blogs, website copy, social media posts, videos or even your meta descriptions. In a recent survey, it was found […]

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What Type of Content Should You Create: Long or Short?

Which form of content should you focus on creating? Should it be long, short, or a mix? If a mix, what’s the right ratio? It all depends. Here are the pros and cons of each, plus six critical questions to help you figure out what’s right for you.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Marketing 101: How to Create a Successful Influencer #Marketing Plan

These days it seems like we’re in need of some unique marketing tactics, and although influencer marketing has […]

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Amanda DiSilvestro

Amanda DiSilvestro gives small business and entrepreneurs SEO advice ranging from keyword density to recovering from Panda and Penguin updates. She writes for HigherVisibility, a nationally recognized SEO consulting firm that offers online marketing services to a wide range of companies across the country. Connect with Higher Visibility on Google+and Twitter to learn more!

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