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US government CIO calls for “self-aware” systems for IoT

ex-machina-self-aware-computers

As the Internet of Things (IoT) grows to an enormous scale, new security and scalability challenges are bound to emerge. According to the chief information officer (CIO) of the federal government, Tony Scott, the issues may be fixed by implemented self aware systems and lowering the amount of data analysed.

Speaking at the ICIT Forum 2016, Scott — who previously worked for Microsoft and VMWare under the same title — said that IoT components lack a few critical features that may lead to major issues.

See also: Rise in IoT pushes government agencies to rethink security

The first missing feature is self awareness; the ability for the component to ask questions like “Am I healthy? Am I still operating the way I was designed to? Have I been compromised? Can I call for help?” Self aware components might even be able to self diagnose, providing a report every few hours on its health to a centralized server.

Self awareness is not artificial intelligence, but provides the chip with enough “brain power” to know when it’s unhealthy or vulnerable to attack. This could save money by lowering the amount of analysis done on an IoT network.

This leads into Scott’s next point on the over analysation of a network. He calls for systems to be created that send only the most important pieces of information, rather than an entire network of info.

Security an “intractable problem?”

“I don’t believe we can collect logs and analyze them for everything that’s going to be a participant in the Internet of Things,” said Scott. “I don’t think there’s enough compute power or enough data science to do that effectively at really large scale. It’s just an intractable kind of problem.”

Scott believes that developers of IoT systems need to look at new ways of designing systems that differ from previous platforms. He suggests that developers rethink how a system is built and if every component is necessary to make IoT functional and secure.

Automation of systems is being tested by a few companies like Google and IBM, which want to use artificial intelligence to lower the amount of human input, but it is still in the early days. Other systems like the blockchain might help towards a more computer-orientated system of trust and security.

The post US government CIO calls for “self-aware” systems for IoT appeared first on ReadWrite.

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Federal CIO calls for “self aware” systems for the Internet of Things

ex-machina-self-aware-computers

As the Internet of Things (IoT) grows to an enormous scale, new security and scalability challenges are bound to emerge. According to the chief information officer (CIO) of the federal government, Tony Scott, the issues may be fixed by implemented self aware systems and lowering the amount of data analysed.

Speaking at the ICIT Forum 2016, Scott — who previously worked for Microsoft and VMWare under the same title — said that IoT components lack a few critical features that may lead to major issues.

See Also: Calm, cruel, and connected: May’s best and worst of IoT

The first missing feature is self awareness; the ability for the component to ask questions like “Am I healthy? Am I still operating the way I was designed to? Have I been compromised? Can I call for help?” Self aware components might even be able to self diagnose, providing a report every few hours on its health to a centralized server.

Self awareness is not artificial intelligence, but provides the chip with enough “brain power” to know when it’s unhealthy or vulnerable to attack. This could save money by lowering the amount of analysis done on an IoT network.

This leads into Scott’s next point on the over analysation of a network. He calls for systems to be created that send only the most important pieces of information, rather than an entire network of info.

“I don’t believe we can collect logs and analyse them for everything that’s going to be a participant in the Internet of Things,” said Scott. “I don’t think there’s enough compute power or enough data science to do that effectively at really large scale. It’s just an intractable kind of problem.”

Scott believes that developers of IoT systems need to look at new ways of designing systems that differ from previous platforms. He suggests that developers rethink how a system is built and if every component is necessary to make IoT functional and secure.

Automation of systems is being tested by a few companies like Google and IBM, which want to use artificial intelligence to lower the amount of human input, but it is still in the early days. Other systems like the blockchain might help towards a more computer-orientated system of trust and security.

The post Federal CIO calls for “self aware” systems for the Internet of Things appeared first on ReadWrite.

View full post on ReadWrite

Energy group calls for slashing autonomous car regs in US

google-autonomous-car

An energy group comprised of retired U.S. military officials and business executives has come out in favor of removing regulatory barriers for autonomous cars at the federal level.

Currently, all autonomous cars on public roads must have a driver able to take over at any time, but federal approval of Level 4 autonomy would allow cars on the road without a human inside.

See Also: Will autonomous cars lead to even more congestion?

The group, called the Energy Security Leadership Council (ESLC), claims that on top of lowering accidents on the road, autonomous cars may reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil imports.

92 percent of cars run on oil at the current time, but ESLC believes government intervention to help the rise of hybrid or fully electric cars could reduce that to 50 percent by 2040.

“Ultimately, we should allow Level 4 cars on roads as soon as they are as safe as today’s vehicles,” said Robbie Diamond, CEO of Secure America’s Future Energy (SAFE), of which ESLC is a division.

Driverless safer than “driverful?”

There is some evidence to suggest that autonomous cars are already safer than humans in cars, if we take the number of accidents per miles that Google has reported and compare it to human drivers.

States currently have different laws in regards to autonomous cars, some let Google, Tesla, and Uber test on public roads, but others continue to block access. ESLC’s call on Washington to change autonomy at the federal level would alleviate those issues, and allow cross-country tests.

The proposal from ESLC comes a few weeks before the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA) draft guidelines for deployment of autonomous cars. It is the first draft that could legalize autonomous cars on highways, similar to the UK’s recent legislative decision, announced during the Queen’s Speech.

Other lobbying groups in D.C. have pushed for relaxed regulations on autonomous cars, including groups backed by Uber, Ford, and Google. Millions have been invested, but so far we haven’t seen much progress.

The post Energy group calls for slashing autonomous car regs in US appeared first on ReadWrite.

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