Posts tagged Been

You’ve Been Hit by Penguin! Should You Start Over or Try to Recover?

If you’ve been affected by Google’s Penguin algorithm, the results can sometimes be devastating. Can your site ever recover, or does it make more sense to just scrap the site and start with a new one? This post will help you decide.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

Twitter Has Been Too Slow To Catch Up With The Visual Web

Eight years after the invention of Twitter, animated GIFs have finally come to the network. That’s way too slow, and it tells us a lot about the speed with which Twitter is adapting to the way people use the Web these days.

Animated GIFs, image formats which display a looping video clip, have been around since the days of Usenet and America Online. For nearly a decade they fell out of fashion, until their slightly kitschy nostalgia brought them back to prominence. Quick to load and easy for anybody to create, they’ve slowly repopulated the Internet. 

For the past year, you’ve been able to embed and share animated GIFs on Facebook and Pinterest—far longer than that on Tumblr and Reddit. Among the social networks that matter, Twitter is dead last in providing this functionality. 

Thanks for the final concession, Twitter, but the fact that it took you so long to add support for GIFs is a symptom of your larger problem.

Why Visual Matters

Whether you think they’re tacky or terrific, animated GIFs are a hallmark of the visual way users browse and create on the Web. 

People have grown tired of text. And with faster network speeds, their devices can load images just as quickly as they once loaded simpler applications. From the days of cave painting, humans have always been visual creatures. As attention spans shorten and Internet speeds, increase it’s clear which we prefer.

Welcome to the Visual Web, perhaps the fastest growing segment of the Internet. Pinterest, the image sharing platform you can no longer afford to ignore, is valuated at $5 billion. GIF pioneer Tumblr has got the youth market cornered in a way Yahoo! could only buy, not replicate.

As Twitter is probably well aware, young people aren’t adopting the social network at the same rate they once were. Instead, they’re over at Tumblr, Snapchat, WeHeartIt, and upstarts too new to name, each with one thing in common—heavily visual interfaces.

Twitter, which rose to prominence on 140-character text-only messages, has only recently gotten the visual bug. It launched Vine support in January 2013, but video never caught on as quickly as GIFs. Silent and auto-loading, you don’t need to press play on a GIF. Meanwhile, just try loading a video on your phone in a public place.

In October 2013, Twitter finally allowed for image preview support, giving it a wannabe Pinterest-grid look. Twitter users could share screenshots as well as video—just not their tweener cousin, the GIF. Meanwhile, the GIF captivated more and more Internet users, taking the best of both worlds and providing sites like Buzzfeed a tool on which to hang their business models.

In the past eight years, many Twitter users have found other outlets for their creative GIF expression. Twitter’s begrudging support looks like too little, too late.  

The Problem With Twitter

Ever since the company’s public IPO last fall, Twitter has struggled with investors unhappy about its user growth. 

With 241 million monthly active users, the social network may not look any less bustling than before, but it’s adding users at a much slower rate than in past years. Perhaps it’s because, even after eight years, many people still don’t agree on its purpose.

One obvious solution would be to appeal to a younger audience, and animated GIF support might be an effort to do just that. But after all this time, it’s likely that teens have already chosen social networks that allowed for GIFs long before now.

Not much has changed since CEO Dick Costolo’s first post-IPO discussion about what he planned to do to remedy Twitter’s slow growth. A few weeks ago, Twitter shares lost more than $4 billion in market value as early investors unloaded their stocks. The fact that Twitter now offers GIF support probably isn’t going to turn things around just like that, especially when investors can pour their money into networks that predicted the Visual Web ages ago. 

As Twitter tries to become everything to everyone, it risks driving its core audience away. At its invention, Twitter was revolutionary. Let’s hope it isn’t doomed to become an afterthought.

View full post on ReadWrite

Google May Disclose When Search Results Have Been Censored Due To ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ by @mattsouthern

The Guardian reports today that Google is considering letting users know in the search results pages when search results have been removed due to the recent EU ‘right to be forgotten’ privacy ruling. Since the ruling by the European court of justice on May 13th, Google has received tens of thousands of requests from internet users to take down sensitive information. The Guardian says that “it is understood” Google is planning to flag censored search results. Google is planning to place an alert at the bottom of each page where it has removed links, similar to how Google alerts users […]

The post Google May Disclose When Search Results Have Been Censored Due To ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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No, Google Says There’s Been No Penguin Update

This morning, I noticed a lot of buzz around a possible Google Penguin update. The SEO space was noticing huge changes in the search results from perviously penalized sites, many that were impacted by the Google Penguin update. The Google Penguin algorithm targets sites trying to manipulate their…



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View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Bing Ads Intelligence: Microsoft’s Keyword Tool We’ve Been Waiting For by @Rocco_Zebra_Adv

Bing has always had a lot of room for improvement when it comes to keywords. The majority of advertisers preferred  to use Google’s keyword tool to build out campaigns in Bing because Bing’s tools were not user-friendly. This has a big disadvantage: the keyword lists were not customized to Bing’s unique search trends. Now, Bing has finally launched a solution called Bing Ads Intelligence. It is an add-on for your Excel that allows you to work on keyword researches for all of your accounts on Bing. Easy to Install Once you download and install the extension from Bing Ads, you will be able to open […]

The post Bing Ads Intelligence: Microsoft’s Keyword Tool We’ve Been Waiting For by @Rocco_Zebra_Adv appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Matt Cutts Explains How To Avoid Buying A Domain That Has Been Penalized By Google

Matt Cutts, Google’s head of search spam, answers a question about buying domains in his latest Webmaster Help […]

Author information

Matt Southern

Matt Southern is a marketing, communications and public relations professional. He provides strategic digital marketing services at an agency called Bureau in Ontario, Canada. He has a bachelors degree in communication and an unparalleled passion for helping businesses get their message out.

The post Matt Cutts Explains How To Avoid Buying A Domain That Has Been Penalized By Google appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Matt Cutts Explains How You Can Tell If Your Website Has Been Hit By A Particular Algorithm by @mattsouthern

Matt Cutts, Google’s head of search spam, answered a question about Google penalties in his latest Webmaster Help video where a user writes in to ask: How can you tell if your site is suffering from an algorithmic penalty, or you are simply being outgunned by better content? Although the user didn’t specifically ask about […]

Author information

Matt Southern

Matt Southern is a marketing, communications and public relations professional. He provides strategic digital marketing services at an agency called Bureau in Ontario, Canada. He has a bachelors degree in communication and an unparalleled passion for helping businesses get their message out.

The post Matt Cutts Explains How You Can Tell If Your Website Has Been Hit By A Particular Algorithm by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Negative SEO: Have Mercenaries Been Hired To Torpedo Your Search Rankings? – Forbes


Forbes
Negative SEO: Have Mercenaries Been Hired To Torpedo Your Search Rankings?
Forbes
Schemes like this, unfortunately, are an aspect of an emerging trend we're seeing when it comes to negative SEO. Campaigns like these are used to point thousands of poor-quality, spammy links at a competitors' website in an attempt to cause their

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Google Give Tips For Identifying If Your Site Has Been Hacked, And How To Fix It by @mattsouthern

A post went up on Google’s official Webmaster Central Blog last night from a representative of the Search Quality Team providing tips for how to find out if your site has been hacked, as well as fix it and prevent future incidents. Since hacking is surprisingly common I felt it was important to pass along […]

Author information

Matt Southern

Matt Southern is a marketing, communications and public relations professional. He provides strategic digital marketing services at an agency called Bureau in Ontario, Canada. He has a bachelors degree in communication and an unparalleled passion for helping businesses get their message out.

The post Google Give Tips For Identifying If Your Site Has Been Hacked, And How To Fix It by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Has There Ever Been A Worse Time To Be In The Enterprise Hardware Business?

Technology journalist Robert Cringley thinks IBM is doomed because it just sold its Intel server business to Lenovo. On the contrary, this may be the clearest indication that IBM may thrive. After all, given the trend toward cloud and build-your-own-datacenters, has there ever been a worse time to be selling enterprise servers?

“An Act Of Desperation For IBM”

Let’s be clear. Every incumbent hardware company is under the gun as low-margin cloud businesses boom. Amazon puts every hardware company under pressure and is even causing fits for those trying to make a business of selling private cloud technology. 

Yet Robert Cringley, a longtime IBM critic, believes IBM “has sold the future to invest in the past,” referring to its mainframe business, which it retains. He goes on to suggest that, “little servers are the future of big computing” and that, “IBM needs to be a major supplier and a major player in this emerging market.”

Yes and no.

It seems clear that selling big hardware like mainframes is a dying business. Yes, enterprises will continue to buy it, but if the last few earnings calls from IBM, Oracle and their peers are any indication, big hardware is a difficult proposition in the age of cloud. 

Not that the big incumbents are giving up on big hardware. As reported by ReadWrite in November 2013, Oracle CEO Larry Ellison believes the future datacenter will include purpose-built, big hardware and low-end commodity servers, with the latter constituting the core of enterprise workloads. But that core will not powered by Oracle. Or IBM. Or any mega-vendor.

The problem is that these legacy server companies are not buying into that “purpose-built,” insanely expensive hardware, either. Hence, while CA Technologies may like to pretend that the mainframe is an integral part of the “data center of the future,” as a recent Wall Street Journal advertisement proposes, IT buyers aren’t buying.

Why Not Sell “Little” Servers?

If big hardware is struggling, why shouldn’t IBM, Oracle and other enterprise incumbents trade in commodity servers? In large part, they can’t. Not while being profitable anyway. 

The commodity server business has been further commoditized by the rise of white box server vendors and open-source datacenter initiatives like Facebook’s Open Compute project. As Accenture writes, “Facebook’s Open Compute Project is accelerating the adoption of infrastructure innovations by sharing those breakthroughs freely.” For incumbent server vendors, “freely” is the last thing they want to hear.

It may be on the verge of getting even worse. According to McKinsey & Company, in 2014 enterprises need to increase their emphasis on private cloud deployments:

Many large infrastructure functions are experiencing “cloud stall.” They have built an intriguing set of technology capabilities but are using it to host only a small fraction of their workloads. It may be that they cannot make the business case work due to migration costs, or that they have doubts about the new environment’s ability to support critical workloads, or that they cannot reconcile the cloud environment with existing sourcing arrangements. Over the next year, infrastructure organizations must shift from treating the private cloud as a technology innovation to treating it as an opportunity to evolve their operating model.

If this happens, and there are good reasons to believe enterprise developers will continue to skip the private cloud in favor of public cloud options like Amazon Web Services, it won’t serve enterprise hardware companies very well. With increasing interest in open datacenter designs, enterprises can  utilize private clouds with low-end, white box vendor servers rather than higher-cost, name-brand servers from the likes of IBM.

Which, presumably, is one big reason IBM sold its commodity server business.

The Future Of Hardware Is Software

Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen argues that “software is eating the world.” Along the way, it’s also eating hardware. At least, the fancy name-brand hardware that used to mint billions for IBM and its peers.

This is what Cringley misses. He blithely suggests of IBM that, “they are selling a lower-margin business where customer are actually buying to invest in a higher-margin business where customers aren’t buying.” This is true. But it doesn’t lead to his conclusion: “IBM needs to learn how to operate in a commodity market. IBM needs to become the lowest cost, highest volume producer of commodity servers.”

This is like suggesting that IBM needs to slit its right wrist instead of its left wrist. In either market, IBM is going to lose. The difference is that it can milk the high-margin, fading business for years as it tries to transform itself into a commodity cloud computing business. With the acquisition of Softlayer, it is well on its way, though the journey will be brutally painful.

Which, I suppose, is how I’d describe any company trying to make a living peddling hardware. Or cloud, for that matter. The cloud is compressing margins on all hardware businesses, even as Amazon forces would-be cloud competitors into a game of low-margin commodity cloud pricing. For hardware companies, it seems to be a lose-lose proposition. But it may be the only option they have.

View full post on ReadWrite

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