Posts tagged Avoid

How To Avoid The Community Of Open Source Jerks

Open source is the new default for many areas of software. But open source is different, and that’s causing some problems for newbies. While some reduce open source to “free software I can download,” open source can be much more. 

To get the most from open-source software, companies and other big organizations must be willing to engage in the projects important to them. This can be a prickly affair, given how unwelcoming some communities can be. And yet, as Bert Hubert highlights, “community is the best predictor of the future of a project.” 

See also: How To Get Started In Open Source

Strong communities build strong software. But finding your way into a community that will welcome not just your adoption but also your contributions can be tricky. Here’s how.

Learning From Linux

First of all, it’s critical to find an open-source project with momentum behind it. But just because a community is large doesn’t mean it’s where you want to set up shop.

 Take Linux, for example. Linus Torvalds, who first released Linux over a decade ago, admits to making a “metric s–tload” of community mistakes in that time. Like, for instance, telling this developer that “*YOU* are full of bulls–t.” Or castigating Red Hat for “adding stupid code to the kernel only to encourage stupidities in other people.”

But it’s not just Torvalds. Other project maintainers can be equally caustic, or merely unwelcoming to would-be contributors. Others, like Docker, have occasional missteps where adversity reveals an undercurrent of antagonism toward community members that don’t fall in line with the project leader’s chosen path.

See also: Want To Start An Open-Source Project? Here’s How

These may be projects where you want to be a net consumer. But there should be other projects where you do more than download and actually give back to the community, thereby helping it to grow.

Your Community Mileage May Vary

To be successful, you need to learn the nuance of how a particular project operates. Linux, for example, is not one community. It is many. So what works for one subsystem won’t work for another.

For example, Greg Kroah-Hartman,  Linux kernel maintainer for the -stable branch, the staging subsystem, and other areas, was asked whether newbies should “make patches to correct superficial things like whitespace, comments, etc.” 

His response? It depends. 

Other subsystem maintainers consider whitespace and spelling fixes to be a waste of their time, and it is, as they don’t want to deal with that type of stuff. So don’t do whitespace fixes for their subsystems, do it in the areas of the kernel where it is encouraged and common. A specific example of that is the drivers/staging/ area of the kernel, I maintain that part and want you to send in whitespace fixes as I know it is a way to get people involved and that is what I want to encourage and do.

Kroah-Hartman wants to encourage new developers. Others do not. Picking the right community to match not only your interests, but also your pain tolerance, becomes critical. 

Learn Your Community

It’s also critical to follow the community before diving in. Even the most welcoming of project leaders will not appreciate someone making a lot of noise without first making the efforts to learn the rules of engagement for that particular community.

That’s always good practice, but in some communities it’s imperative. Take, for example, project lead Howard Chu’s recent message to would-be contributors on the OpenLDAP project:

If you post to this list and your message is deemed off-topic or insufficiently researched, you *will* be chided, mocked, and denigrated. There *is* such a thing as a stupid question. If you don’t read what’s in front of you, if you ignore the list charter, or the text of the welcome message that is sent to every new subscriber, you will be publicly mocked and made unwelcome.”

Chu’s comment leads Hubert to conclude, “Before picking a technology to depend on, investigate how they deal with feature requests, bug reports and questions.” Why? Because “what you will learn is the best predictor of how the project will serve you (and vice versa!) over the coming years.”

In short, not only do you want to piggyback on a solid community, but if you’re going to contribute to that project, you want to make sure it feels like home. If it doesn’t, you need to find a different project. Because ultimately, open source is all about community, not merely code.

Lead photo by Sarah_Ackerman

View full post on ReadWrite

Avoid Access Disruption On GitHub By Updating Your Keys

It’s time to update older SSH keys on GitHub—or risk organizations blocking your access to their open source projects.

SSH, or Secure Shell, is a cryptographic protocol for secure data communication. Many projects hosting on GitHub—especially Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) which let a high volume of developers access secure app data—have developers generate SSH keys in order to be granted access to them. Developers can use these keys to ensure their own programs that rely on API data continue to have access.

See also: How To Win Friends And Make Pull Requests On GitHub

Back in February, GitHub made a small but significant change to the way SSH keys work. It made them immutable, or unchangeable, after they’d been generated. Previously developers could change their SSH keys after they’d been created. Since February, however, developers can only create and delete keys, not alter keys that already exist.

Now, GitHub is finalizing that update by ensuring that any keys created before the Feb. 24 announcement will be removed. That means developers using older keys will have to create new ones in order to see uninterrupted access to projects. Otherwise, organizations that maintain open source projects will simply remove their permissions.

GitHub will automatically send an email to any user whose SSH key is deleted by an organization, so developers shouldn’t be surprised if they lose access. However, they can avoid a headache by identifying keys created before February and replacing them now.

Photo by Taki Steve

View full post on ReadWrite

Re-Entering the Strike Zone – How to Avoid Panda Relapses and Temporary Recoveries

Temporary Panda recoveries can happen, so it’s important to continually analyze your site through a Panda lens. This post covers five reasons that Panda may return, and includes tips for avoiding Panda relapses.

View full post on Home – SearchEngineWatch

Bing Maps Helps Drivers Avoid Traffic Around The World

Previously only available in the U.S., Bing Maps is now helping travelers around the world avoid traffic jams with its Clearflow technology. According to Bing, Clearflow can predict traffic on roads that do not include live traffic data. Traffic issues across the globe will now be marked with red…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

How to Avoid Contributing to Content Bloat

Content bloat is not only horrible for Google, but it’s also horrible for users and trust.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

3 HARO Requests You Should Avoid by @joshuatitsworth

So, the title sounds a little “click baity”, but it is what it is. Everyone knows HARO can be a great way to some great publicity and not to mention some great links in the process. But not everyone knows there are some requests you might not want to reply to, or rather there are requests your client would want you to avoid sending them. Given that HARO’s are very time sensitive make sure to take a look at some of the requests I’ve listed below and -more importantly- some items you’ll want to go over with your clients to […]

The post 3 HARO Requests You Should Avoid by @joshuatitsworth appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Google: We Acted Quickly On Right To Be Forgotten Requests To Avoid Litigation

Although there was little guidance on how to handle “Right To Be Forgotten” (RTBF) requests, Google’s PR Chief in Europe says the company acted quickly to process those requests and remove some URLs out of a fear of being sued. Peter Barron, the head of Google’s European…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Google: We Acted Quickly On RTBF Requests To Avoid Litigation

Although there was little guidance on how to handle “Right To Be Forgotten” (RTBF) requests, Google’s PR Chief in Europe says the company acted quickly to process those requests and remove some URLs out of a fear of being sued. Peter Barron, the head of Google’s European…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

4 Pitfalls to Avoid Heading Into the Holidays

Here are four pitfalls that seem to occur every year, along with some thoughts on how to best avoid them or deal with them as they occur.

View full post on Search Engine Watch – Latest

SMX East Recap: Avoid Content Marketing Chaos by @matt_secrist

I attended SMX East this year, and had the awesome opportunity to take in a wide variety of sessions. One of my favorites included “Content Marketing: Success by Design” with Eric Enge and Mark Traphagen. They gave a great presentation and offered plenty  of great points designed to help brands take their content marketing efforts to the next level. Below are a few insights I took away from the presentation. Define Your Market Space One of the main goals of content marketing is to get in front of other people’s audiences through guest posting. The first question you should ask […]

The post SMX East Recap: Avoid Content Marketing Chaos by @matt_secrist appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2015, DC2NET All rights reserved