Posts tagged Around

Twitter Releases New Tool For Curating Best Tweets Around A Particular Topic by @mattsouthern

One of the greatest challenges on Twitter is cutting through the noise to find tweets with the most value, insight, and influence. Today, the company released a new tool designed to tackle that challenge. Curator can surface and display the most relevant Twitter (and Vine) content centered around a particular topic. Twitter is framing this as a tool for media publishers, because the end goal is to broadcast a stream of curated tweets on the web or TV, but I see some use for marketers as well. For example, at marketing conferences you often see TV screens set up with a live […]

The post Twitter Releases New Tool For Curating Best Tweets Around A Particular Topic by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

How Pebble Became The Cheapest Android Smartwatch Around

Pebblers with Android smartphones can now receive and respond to Android Wear notifications, a big step forward that might actually make the Pebble the least expensive Android Wear smartwatch currently available.

A new firmware update basically bring to Pebble the same active notifications that Android Wear users enjoy on their fancier—and more expensive—smartwatches. A navigation app’s notifications, for instance, will appear as turn-by-turn directions on the watch; a music app’s notifications could let you pause, skip a song and adjust the volume.

While the new addition isn’t as easy-to-use as it is on Android Wear devices (users can’t swipe to interact with notifications, and instead have to navigate the Pebble’s menus via its side buttons), it’ll still helps the elder statesman of the smartwatch world stay competitive as the countdown to the Apple Watch continues.

Androidizing Your Pebble

Square Cash via Android Wear notifications on the Pebble smartwatch.

Start by updating your Pebble to the latest firmware (version 2.9), then download version 2.3.0 of the Pebble Android app from the Google Play Store. From there, you’ll also need to also install the Android Wear app.

The Pebble troubleshooting page explains a few workarounds for making the new Android Wear features work to your liking. Depending on the apps, there still may be a few hiccups along the way.

There are some unexpected pluses as well. Android Wear notifications on Pebble will allow users to store canned responses that users can send in response to text messages—a feature still missing from Android Wear without the use of a third-party app.  The update also allows users to receive Gmail notifications and send and receive money via Square Cash.

Is Pebble’s Gain Android Wear’s Loss?

There are still some unknowns as well. It’s not clear that Pebble will handle all Android Wear notifications with equal grace, or if some won’t work at all. And we don’t know if Pebble has a “whitelist” of Android apps whose notifications will definitely work with the watch. I’ve reached out to Pebble and will update if I hear back.

Meanwhile, Pebble’s embrace of this Android Wear feature may have other implications worth considering. Google’s hardware partners are already hedging their bets on Android Wear by embracing alternative operating systems, either as replacements for Google or as experiments they could turn to should Android Wear falter.

Pebble’s Android Wear compatibility might, conceivably, strengthen the software platform by greatly expanding its wearable reach. On the other hand, if the integration works well, Pebble might well become a less expensive alternative that could ultimately impact the already limited sales of dedicated Android Wear smartwatches.

Photos courtesy of Pebble

View full post on ReadWrite

Google Expands Webmaster Documentation Around Reconsideration Requests

Google clarifies and expands on their reconsideration request documentation for those webmasters who have been hit by a Google manual action.

The post Google Expands Webmaster Documentation Around Reconsideration Requests appeared first on Search Engine Land.



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Welcome To Peak Car—And A Transformation In How We Get Around

ReadWriteDrive is an ongoing series covering the future of transportation.

It’s looking increasingly likely that we’ve reached peak car, the point at which overall automobile usage tops out. The U.S. and Europe appear to be at that point now; the rest of the world may follow within a decade.

You’d think that would spell trouble for the privately owned car—a future of waning use and perhaps eventual extinction. Think again. Peak car is the result of some major trends that look to marks the biggest change in automobile use since Henry Ford, as the car evolves from a huge piece of standalone hardware in a garage to a computerized network tool for the 21st century.

Auto Use Really Is Down

Peak car represents a major U-turn on thinking from just five years ago. That’s when transportation researchers forecast that the world was headed full-throttle towards global gridlock in the next 20 years, with the number of vehicles on global roads worldwide jumping from 1 billion to 2 billion.

No longer. “We reached peak motorization [in the U.S.] around 2004,” says Michael Sivak, director of the Sustainable Worldwide Transportation group at the University of Michigan. The number of light-duty vehicle registrations in the U.S. stood at 236,448 in 2008; by 2010, it had dipped to 230,444. Total miles driven in the U.S. peaked in 2007. Similar trends hold in Europe.

<a href=”http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/ALTSALES”>Data from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis</a> shows the decline in U.S. car sales during and following the Great Recession

Of course, other factors have depressed auto sales and use in recent years—most important, high oil prices and the Great Recession of 2007-2009 and the subsequent protracted recovery.

Sivak, however, argues that economic factors alone don’t explain the downturn in car ownership and usage, because U.S. declines in the number of cars owned per person and in households actually predate the Great Recession. As he told me: “Major contributors are increased telecommuting, increased use of public transportation, increased urbanization of the population, and young persons relying on electronic communication to replace some of their need for driving.”

As goes the U.S., this thinking suggests, so eventually goes the world. Though it might still take some time, given still-rising car adoption in Asia—especially China, already the biggest auto market in the world.

Why The Car Is Peaking

While not everyone agrees that Peak Car is here already, there’s a rough consensus among researchers that some major social and technological trends are converging to limit demand for new cars.

Susan Shaheen, a director of innovative mobility at UC Berkeley, suggests that today’s millennials are gravitating toward what she calls “shared mobility”—a term that encompasses cars, bikes and “rides” a la services like Uber or Lyft. Most of these services are only possible because of mobile apps, online vehicle reservations and “smart keys” that let people unlock and use vehicles scattered across a city instead of in often inconvenient central lots.

But she notes that other demographic factors are also at play. Over the past several years, for instance, Americans have started moving back to big cities in droves. That, in turn, increases the difficulty of driving, fueling, insuring and parking cars in increasingly congested urban environments.

Enter The Driverless Car

On top of all that, there’s potentially one more big game-changing technological development on the horizon: The self-driving car.

See also: Why Google’s Driverless Car Is Evil

Here’s how Sheehan sees the advent of cars that no longer require drivers:

Vehicles could eventually self-park and self-charge, provide first- and last-mile connectivity to public transit, and fill other gaps in the transportation network. As a result, the need for private vehicle ownership will likely decrease.

The fully autonomous car is still years away (if not longer) from hitting roads as a commercial vehicle. But automakers are already taking some major steps in that direction.

Many Ford models, for instance, already offer autonomous parallel parking. Later this year, the company will introduce cars that independently maneuver into empty spaces in a parking lot, Erich Merkle, Ford’s U.S. sales analyst, told me.

That’s not to say that big automakers embrace the notion of Peak Car. Far from it.

“The autonomous car changes the dynamics, because it allows you to be more productive while your car is in motion,” said Merkle. “It takes away your need to dedicate attention to the job of navigating your vehicle. You might have people putting more rather than fewer miles on a car.”

Merkle believes that the need for mobility is persistent. He said that in the United States, there are many places, especially in flyover states, where wide-open spaces make owning a car an economic necessity. It’s the means by which people get to work, run errands, and travel just about anywhere.

Even in cities, where millennials can hold off on buying a car while “living in studio apartments and clubbing it for a few years,” as Merkle puts it, the need for personal mobility returns with a vengeance when people settle down and start a family. “Never bet against procreation,” warned Merkle.

“Personal car ownership is not going away,” said Sheryl Connelly, Ford global consumer trend and futuring manager. “But it will be reinterpreted.”

Smart Cars Are Still Cars

As you might expect, automaker officials like Connelly see an ongoing need for mobility. “People need to be in cars,” she said.

At the same time, Ford recognizes that consumers expect to be connected all the time, even while traveling in a car. That’s why Ford was among the first car companies to offer Bluetooth connections for smartphones—at first, mostly to let drivers make and receive hands-free calls in their vehicles—even in economy cars and often as a standard feature.

Under the direction of chairman Bill Ford Jr., the automaker was also among the first to officially re-think its mission. No longer is Ford simply about selling hardware and software in the form an automobile; its mission now is to provide “mobility solutions.” It even just hired a chief data and analytics officer to “speed development of the mobility, connectivity and autonomous driving innovations that will improve people’s lives.”

Nearly every major carmaker is now thinking beyond cars to a range of connected mobility offerings.

Technology will most likely both decrease the need for personal vehicle ownership (see Uber) and make it easier to deal with congested roads. Cars and navigation tools are smart enough to warn you about traffic jams, or help you navigate around them. 

“The midterm vision is vehicle-to-vehicle, and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications,” Connelly said. “But it’s still about cars, and how they move people from point A to point B.”

Lead image by Jakob Montrasio; LA freeway interchange photo by Neil Kremer

View full post on ReadWrite

Looks Like We’ve Reached Peak Car—And A Transformation In How We Get Around

ReadWriteDrive is an ongoing series covering the future of transportation.

It’s looking increasingly likely that we’ve reached peak car, the point at which overall automobile usage tops out. The U.S. and Europe appear to be at that point now; the rest of the world may follow within a decade.

You’d think that would spell trouble for the privately owned car—a future of waning use and perhaps eventual extinction. Think again. Peak car is the result of some major trends that look to marks the biggest change in automobile use since Henry Ford, as the car evolves from a huge piece of standalone hardware in a garage to a computerized network tool for the 21st century.

Auto Use Really Is Down

Peak car represents a major U-turn on thinking from just five years ago. That’s when transportation researchers forecast that the world was headed full-throttle towards global gridlock in the next 20 years, with the number of vehicles on global roads worldwide jumping from 1 billion to 2 billion.

No longer. “We reached peak motorization [in the U.S.] around 2004,” says Michael Sivak, director of the Sustainable Worldwide Transportation group at the University of Michigan. The number of light-duty vehicle registrations in the U.S. stood at 236,448 in 2008; by 2010, it had dipped to 230,444. Total miles driven in the U.S. peaked in 2007. Similar trends hold in Europe.

<a href=”http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/ALTSALES”>Data from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis</a> shows the decline in U.S. car sales during and following the Great Recession

Of course, other factors have depressed auto sales and use in recent years—most important, high oil prices and the Great Recession of 2007-2009 and the subsequent protracted recovery.

Sivak, however, argues that economic factors alone don’t explain the downturn in car ownership and usage, because U.S. declines in the number of cars owned per person and in households actually predate the Great Recession. As he told me: “Major contributors are increased telecommuting, increased use of public transportation, increased urbanization of the population, and young persons relying on electronic communication to replace some of their need for driving.”

As goes the U.S., this thinking suggests, so eventually goes the world. Though it might still take some time, given still-rising car adoption in Asia—especially China, already the biggest auto market in the world.

Why The Car Is Peaking

While not everyone agrees that Peak Car is here already, there’s a rough consensus among researchers that some major social and technological trends are converging to limit demand for new cars.

Susan Shaheen, a director of innovative mobility at UC Berkeley, suggests that today’s millennials are gravitating toward what she calls “shared mobility”—a term that encompasses cars, bikes and “rides” a la services like Uber or Lyft. Most of these services are only possible because of mobile apps, online vehicle reservations and “smart keys” that let people unlock and use vehicles scattered across a city instead of in often inconvenient central lots.

But she notes that other demographic factors are also at play. Over the past several years, for instance, Americans have started moving back to big cities in droves. That, in turn, increases the difficulty of driving, fueling, insuring and parking cars in increasingly congested urban environments.

Enter The Driverless Car

On top of all that, there’s potentially one more big game-changing technological development on the horizon: The self-driving car.

See also: Why Google’s Driverless Car Is Evil

Here’s how Sheehan sees the advent of cars that no longer require drivers:

Vehicles could eventually self-park and self-charge, provide first- and last-mile connectivity to public transit, and fill other gaps in the transportation network. As a result, the need for private vehicle ownership will likely decrease.

The fully autonomous car is still years away (if not longer) from hitting roads as a commercial vehicle. But automakers are already taking some major steps in that direction.

Many Ford models, for instance, already offer autonomous parallel parking. Later this year, the company will introduce cars that independently maneuver into empty spaces in a parking lot, Erich Merkle, Ford’s U.S. sales analyst, told me.

That’s not to say that big automakers embrace the notion of Peak Car. Far from it.

“The autonomous car changes the dynamics, because it allows you to be more productive while your car is in motion,” said Merkle. “It takes away your need to dedicate attention to the job of navigating your vehicle. You might have people putting more rather than fewer miles on a car.”

Merkle believes that the need for mobility is persistent. He said that in the United States, there are many places, especially in flyover states, where wide-open spaces make owning a car an economic necessity. It’s the means by which people get to work, run errands, and travel just about anywhere.

Even in cities, where millennials can hold off on buying a car while “living in studio apartments and clubbing it for a few years,” as Merkle puts it, the need for personal mobility returns with a vengeance when people settle down and start a family. “Never bet against procreation,” warned Merkle.

“Personal car ownership is not going away,” said Sheryl Connelly, Ford global consumer trend and futuring manager. “But it will be reinterpreted.”

Smart Cars Are Still Cars

As you might expect, automaker officials like Connelly see an ongoing need for mobility. “People need to be in cars,” she said.

At the same time, Ford recognizes that consumers expect to be connected all the time, even while traveling in a car. That’s why Ford was among the first car companies to offer Bluetooth connections for smartphones—at first, mostly to let drivers make and receive hands-free calls in their vehicles—even in economy cars and often as a standard feature.

Under the direction of chairman Bill Ford Jr., the automaker was also among the first to officially re-think its mission. No longer is Ford simply about selling hardware and software in the form an automobile; its mission now is to provide “mobility solutions.” It even just hired a chief data and analytics officer to “speed development of the mobility, connectivity and autonomous driving innovations that will improve people’s lives.”

Nearly every major carmaker is now thinking beyond cars to a range of connected mobility offerings.

Technology will most likely both decrease the need for personal vehicle ownership (see Uber) and make it easier to deal with congested roads. Cars and navigation tools are smart enough to warn you about traffic jams, or help you navigate around them. 

“The midterm vision is vehicle-to-vehicle, and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications,” Connelly said. “But it’s still about cars, and how they move people from point A to point B.”

Lead image by Jakob Montrasio; LA freeway interchange photo by Neil Kremer

View full post on ReadWrite

Start with Why: Inspiring Ourselves and Those Around Us by @thebigdebowski

For December’s #SEJBookClub, we read Start with Why by Simon Sinek. The book’s tagline is “How great leaders inspire everyone to take action.” Inspiration is a common thread throughout the book and serves as a bottom line for starting with “why”. I was first introduced to Simon via his TED Talk focusing on the importance of knowing why we do what we do. Sinek asserts that knowing why we do what we do is how we inspire ourselves and others. How do you explain it when things don’t go the way you may assume? Or when people seem to defy […]

The post Start with Why: Inspiring Ourselves and Those Around Us by @thebigdebowski appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Google’s Santa Tracker Is Up & Counting Down Days Until Santa’s Annual Sleigh Ride Around The Globe

Now that we have Thanksgiving out of the way, it’s time to start tracking Santa’s whereabouts. To make it easy, Google launched its Santa Tracker today, reminding us there are less than 23 days before Santa makes his annual trip around the globe. This year’s Google Santa Tracker…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Bing Maps Helps Drivers Avoid Traffic Around The World

Previously only available in the U.S., Bing Maps is now helping travelers around the world avoid traffic jams with its Clearflow technology. According to Bing, Clearflow can predict traffic on roads that do not include live traffic data. Traffic issues across the globe will now be marked with red…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

You Might As Well Get Used To Twitter Messing Around With Your Timeline

If you didn’t like Twitter’s recent move to throw random tweets into your timeline, you’re going to hate the future. Twitter is still struggling to make the service more accessible to the masses, a point underscored by its third-quarter earnings report—and that means more tinkering with things like the timeline Twitter fans have grown accustomed to.

See also: Twitter Is Officially Mucking With Your Timeline

While Twitter continues to grow, particularly on mobile, it’s not growing fast enough to make investors happy. Twitter now has 284 million monthly active users, up 23% compared to the year-earlier quarter. The majority of those—80%—access the social network on mobile. Timeline views reached 181 billion, up 14% compared to a year earlier. 

But the microblogging service’s user growth slowed over its previous quarter, and Wall Street was not impressed. Investors knocked down Twitter shares roughly 10% in after-hours trading.

Growth, Growth, Growth

Twitter otherwise turned in an unexceptional quarter. Its revenues more than doubled to $361.3 million compared to a year earlier. So did its losses, which expanded even faster than revenue, to $174.5 million from $64.6 million a year earlier. Those losses, however, weren’t larger than expected.

Twitter, which wants to position itself as a real-time information and discussion hub, remains small by the standards of major social-media networks. Its 284 million active monthly users are dwarfed by the billion-plus on Facebook, for instance.

In order to appeal to a broader audience—one that isn’t already familiar with the quirky and not completely user-friendly argot of tweeting—the company will have to make it easy to better understand how and why people need to use it. That may well current Twitter addicts who are happy with the way things are.

See also: Twitter Demystified: How To RT, MT, #FF And Fave Like A Pro

The company has made some significant changes in recent months, including dumping suggested tweets into your timeline. These posts might include favorited tweets from people you follow or tweets from accounts your followers follow. It might seem convoluted from that description, but the aim is to help newbies find interesting accounts to follow and, eventually, figure out how people and brands tweet.

Twitter said on Monday that new iOS profiles—a complete revamp of the Twitter profile that makes it easy to navigate by putting tweets, photos and favorites in three separate tabs, and the profile bio clear and up front—accounted for an 83% increase in “profile impressions.” That means people looked at other users’ profiles almost twice as much as they did before.

So What Will Twitter Do?

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo laid out some vague plans for change, some of which echoed what he’s been telling investors for the last few quarters

That includes improving things for new users by providing a “high-quality” timeline when they sign up for an account, likely by suggesting tweets and accounts to follow by forcing tweets in the timeline. That could also include an upgrade to Twitter’s direct messaging function, which has been in a dire need of an upgrade for years.

Costolo said Twitter will continue to “innovate on ways to better organize content to deliver best experiences.” Translated from the original Martian, that means more experimentation and continued shuffling of the timeline.

Anthony Noto, Twitter’s CFO, reiterated those expectations. He said on the third-quarter earnings call that while Twitter will continue to be a real-time social network by showing tweets in chronological order, it will begin to distribute tweets and updates that might be hours hold, but that the user might find helpful. Hello, algorithm-based feed!

The company is also working on improving the number of people that use Twitter that don’t actually have a Twitter account. That includes where tweets appear on third-party services like news websites or in applications. According to Twitter, the “logged out” audience, or people who see tweets outside of Twitter proper, is easily as large as the “logged-in audience”—and perhaps as much as twice that size.

Lead photo courtesy of Twitter

View full post on ReadWrite

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2015, DC2NET All rights reserved