Posts tagged Apple’s

Apple’s HealthKit Is Not Very Healthy

The software that will power Apple Watch’s fitness features is delayed.

Apple’s HealthKit, a system for storing and presenting health- and fitness-related data on iPhones, is not ready for prime time.

On Wednesday, a wide range of developers, from giants like Weight Watchers and WebMD to startups like Sleepio and iHealth, were set to release new versions of their apps that worked with iOS 8, the newest version of Apple’s software for iPhones and iPads.

HealthKit is a key new feature of iOS 8, and a major reason for these developers to do big updates for their apps.

See also: Sorry, Apple’s HealthKit Isn’t Going To Give You Six-Pack Abs

But Apple—which controls the timing of app releases through its App Store—told developers Wednesday that it put a hold on releasing any HealthKit-enabled apps.

“It could be a million different things,” said MapMyFitness CEO Robin Thurston, who said Apple’s note to developers didn’t specify the reason.

An Apple PR representative provided this statement to ReadWrite:

We discovered a bug that prevents us from making HealthKit apps available on iOS 8 today. We’re working quickly to have the bug fixed in a software update and have HealthKit apps available by the end of the month.

The HealthKit delay is a black eye for Apple, which likes to deliver new products smoothly. At last week’s product launch, Apple executives showcased iOS 8′s new fitness features on the latest iPhones, as well as on the forthcoming Apple Watch.

Updated with a statement from Apple.

View full post on ReadWrite

Why You Can’t Download Health And Fitness Apps From Apple’s App Store

An unannounced fitness tracker

Fitness-app developers who expected a lift from Apple’s release of iOS 8 and its new health-related features got a nasty surprise Wednesday.

Apple held up new apps that used its HealthKit software to store and present health-related data. And, it turns out, Apple completely removed existing apps which had added HealthKit from the App Store.

MyFitnessPal, a nutrition tracker with 50 million users, was one of the biggest apps affected, as were apps from major brands like WebMD and Walgreens.

“Our app which supported HealthKit integration was removed from the App Store this morning,” MyFitnessPal CEO Mike Lee told me in an email. “We’ve been working with Apple on a solution, and a version without HealthKit should be available shortly.”

Lee said Apple approved a new version of MyFitnessPal without HealthKit shortly after the company submitted it.

As of Monday afternoon, MyFitnessPal was not yet back in the App Store, but Lee said he expected it to return quickly.

That’s the good news for developers.

The bad news, according to Apple, is that the bug that required HealthKit apps’ removal will not be fixed until the end of September.

That’s a blow for startups like Big Health, which had pegged the release of its Sleepio sleep-therapy app to the availability of HealthKit. Sleepio doesn’t do its own sleep-tracking: Instead, it relies on HealthKit-connected fitness trackers or manual input of sleep data in Apple’s Health app, which also uses HealthKit to transfer data.

View full post on ReadWrite

iOS 8 Warning: Apple’s Dropbox Killer Could Murder Your App Data

After a summer of waiting, Apple is unleashing iOS 8, the latest version of its mobile operating system on Wednesday. Among the new features that promise to improve the way you we use our iPhones and iPads, there’s one item that could do the opposite: iCloud Drive.

The new online storage and sync option comes new as part of iOS 8, and it’s supposed to make documents and other data easy to access from both your Apple mobile device and OS X desktop software. The problem: For Mac users, it relies on the latest version of the computer operating system, Yosemite, which isn’t out yet. 

Here’s what you need to know.

iCloud Drive Could Make Some Functions Evaporate

Similar to Dropbox or Google Drive, iCloud Drive is supposed to let you and your apps access data, no matter what Apple device you use (though they need to be new enough to run iOS 8 and Yosemite).

If you’re upgrading to the new iPhone software immediately, the most imperative thing to do—apart from backing up your phone—is not enabling the iCloud Drive option. 

See also: Apple Offers Handy How-To For Android Users Who Want To Make The Switch

Apps—like Realmac Software’s Clear productivity app—can’t function with the feature turned on. Originally, the app featured a desktop component that communicated with the mobile app. iOS 8 and Yosemite hijacks that functionality, unless the user shuts it off. The developer explains in a blog post:

As OS X Yosemite is still pre-release (and not yet available) upgrading to iCloud Drive will prevent you from syncing with Clear for Mac until both OS X Yosemite is released and you upgrade to OS X Yosemite. 

Developers cannot work around the choice made when upgrading to iOS 8, so please make sure you pay close attention to the iCloud Drive screen shown after you update to iOS 8.

Once you install iOS 8, you’ll be asked whether to turn on iCloud Drive. The simple fix: Pick “Not now.”

The iOS 8 update might affect more than just Clear, though.

Other Apps May Be Buggier After Updating To iOS 8 Too

Dropbox also discovered a “compatibility” bug for iOS 8 users. Last night, the company said

We’ve discovered that Apple’s new iOS 8 introduces a compatibility issue that may prevent Dropbox and Carousel from properly uploading your photos and videos. This means that only the contents of your “Recently Added” album will upload automatically.

If you upgrade to iOS 8, don’t delete photos or videos from your devices until you’re sure that your stuff has backed up to Dropbox. Please visit our Help Center for additional details on how to keep your stuff safe.

In essence, it explains that sending photos to the main Dropbox and Carousel services can be buggy, although the report seems pretty vague about the exact problem. Whatever it is, Dropbox says it’s working with Apple to fix it, but to battle confusion for now, it’s suspending automatic backup of photos and videos. 

There will likely be other issues that crop up—that tends to happen whenever new software gets publicly launched—so to be safe, you may not want to grab iOS 8 right away. 

But if you’re brave and rush to download it anyway—available for the iPhone 4s and later, iPad 2 and later, iPad mini and later, or the fifth-generation iPod touch—let us know how you find the new software. Deposit your disappointments (or joys) in the comments below. 

Lead image screenshot by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite. Clear app image courtesy of RealMac Software

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DuckDuckGo To Be Featured In Apple’s iOS 8 by @mattsouthern

DuckDuckGo will be one of several new search engines to choose from as your default search engine in Safari when Apple’s iOS 8 launches on September 17th. DuckDuckGo has been sending out emails to remind users of their inclusion in Apple’s mobile operating system because this is clearly a big deal for the fledgling search engine. It has the potential to expose the search engine to an entirely new audience, and it gives current users the ability to use DuckDuckGo more conveniently on their favorite mobile device. In order to help new users get the most out of DuckDuckGo and […]

The post DuckDuckGo To Be Featured In Apple’s iOS 8 by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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With Apple’s Help, Google Search Gets Special Info Boxes For iPhone 6 & Apple Watch

Who says rivals can’t work together? If you search on Google for “iPhone 6″ or “Apple Watch,” you’ll discover new information boxes about each product that Google created with the help of Apple. Here’s how it looks for search on iPhone 6: And for the iPhone…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

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Without GPS, Apple’s “Sport” Watch Is A Non-Starter

ReadWriteBody is an ongoing series in which ReadWrite covers networked fitness and the quantified self.

It’s as if no one at Apple has ever gone jogging before. Launched to much fanfare this week, Apple’s new watch proclaims itself a jack of all trades, doing everything from showing text message alerts to sending your doodles or heartbeat to that special someone. The one thing it can’t do, despite calling itself a “sport” watch? Keep track of your exercise.

See also: The New Apple Watch Leaves Fitness Trackers Looking Unhealthy 

A bit of a glaring omission, no?

The One Essential Feature

Not that Apple needed to do this. Enough people will want to check their email from their wrist (because, well, it’s hard to glance at that phone!) that Apple will likely sell plenty of über-watches.

But no, Apple chose to target the fitness crowd, and it did so without the one feature that matters more than any other: GPS.

Sure, there’s plenty of exercise that doesn’t require serious lateral or forward movement, and Owen Thomas captures the several uses fitness buffs can get from the new watch. Exercise bicycles, treadmills, jump ropes and more all let you get a good workout without moving around. But for many of these more-or-less stationary exercises, the fitness equipment itself is tracking distance and, sometimes, heart rate. 

But exercise that doesn’t take place indoors—you know, the exercise for which we happily spend several hundred dollars to buy a (GPS-enabled) Garmin watch—requires GPS if you’re going to really track it.

See also: What You Can Do With An Apple Watch

About the best thing you can do without GPS is make out, as these runners are doing. The Apple Watch Sport is capturing their elevated heart rate, but that’s about it:

My Enthusiasm … Deflated

Don’t get me wrong. There are things about the Apple Watch Sport that I love. I often carry an iPod Nano with me when I run. The Watch Sport means I can carry my music with me on my wrist. So that’s a plus. It also means I can ditch the heart rate strap that I normally wear when I run or bike, which is another plus.

That’s why my initial response to the Watch Sport was positive:

But none of the aforementioned features adds up to the $349 (at a minimum! Apple hasn’t been at all clear on pricing) I’d need to spend on the Apple Watch Sport. The only thing that has justified that amount of money for me is GPS. It’s the ability to track distance—to measure how well I’m doing on a run—that has convinced me to buy several Garmin devices over the past few years.

And, no, it’s a not acceptable to lug around my iPhone with me, especially now that they’re getting even bigger (even if they are lighter). That defeats the entire purpose of having a dedicated exercise device. 

Besides, in my experience carrying my iPhone with me on long bike rides, its GPS works nowhere near as well as my Garmin Edge 500. I’ve used both simultaneously on rides up the Alpine Loop at Sundance, Utah, and my Garmin kept perfect track of distance while my iPhone’s GPS crapped out repeatedly.

No GPS, No Deal

Apple has built what looks like a decent watch, one that apparently does all sorts of nifty things. But it has built a terrible exercise watch, and has made it worse by advertising it expressly as a “sport watch.” That’s false advertising, given that it can’t provide the most essential fitness technology: GPS.

Yes, I’m sure the next generation watches will have GPS built-in, once the cost and battery issues are resolved. But for now, I’m sitting this Watch Sport out, even as I enthusiastically wait in line to buy the iPhone 6. 

Photos courtesy of Apple

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple’s Swift Language Goes Pro, Reaches Version 1.0

Swift, Apple’s new in-house programming language, just reached version 1.0. That’s a big deal, because it means apps written in Swift are now eligible for the Apple App Store.

See also: Apple Wants Devs To Love Swift, Its Shiny New Language—But There’s A Catch

“Swift version 1.0 is now GM,” the Apple Developer blog reported Tuesday. GM refers to “golden master,” a term Apple has historically used to refer to the final version of a piece of software that’s ready to be shipped.

For developers, this means anyone who has been messing around with the developer trial of Swift is now welcome to submit apps that use Swift to the App Store. In other words, Swift is now in a final enough state that apps running on it are ready to be released to the public.

You wouldn’t think people would care about whether a programming language is in version 0.5 or 2.5 when our apps and software are updated on a near constant basis. But in the programming world, version numbers still matter a lot.

For example, there’s Node.js, a development framework that has been around since 2009. Even though large companies like Walmart and LinkedIn have adopted it, Node is still considered a risk because it’s still in version 0.10. There are a lot of reasons Node’s overseers are reluctant to take the 1.0 plunge, among them that they’re still undecided which of its features they want to commit to in a “formal” release.

See also: Why The JavaScript World Is Still Waiting For Node.js 1.0

Just because Swift has achieved 1.0 doesn’t mean the team is finished, though. The announcement concludes that Swift will continue to be a work in progress:

You’ll notice we’re using the word “GM”, not “final”. That’s because Swift will continue to advance with new features, improved performance, and refined syntax.

Screenshot by Stephanie Chan for ReadWrite

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple’s iPhone Line-Up: The Last 3.5-Inch Screen Bites It

Bon voyage, iPhone 4S. Thanks for everything. 

When it comes to phones, Apple is now in the phablet business. CEO Tim Cook didn’t refer to the large iPhone 6 or the even more gargantuan iPhone 6 Plus as such. But there’s no doubt Apple’s phone development took a step toward tablet territory. 

Adding jumbo devices to the fray isn’t the only change to the company’s smartphone line-up, though. Apple also got busy rejiggering availability and pricing for its current stock of smaller iPhones. Apple’s online store tells the tale: Some of those devices saw price slashes, while at least one got the old heave-ho, making way for the new iPhones 6, which open for pre-orders Friday.

It’s a lot to take in. But if those changes seem confusing, don’t fret. Here’s a handy guide to iPhone availability.

Apple’s Family of iPhones Now

Apple no longer carries the iPhone 5, its 2012 device that introduced 4-inch displays to the iPhone-using public. But the model didn’t entirely wind up in the smartphone afterlife—it was reborn as 2013’s colorful iPhone 5C.

See also: iOS 8 Offers Some New Tricks For Big iPhones

At this point, the company still carries that low-end model, but it’s no longer a budget device. It’s a freebie phone now. And its sibling, the iPhone 5S—last year’s flagship phone—also went through a price change, dropping from $199 for the 16GB base model to a modest $99 with two-year contract.

As for the even older iPhone 4S, well, it’s time to say goodbye. Apple pulled the plug on the 2011 gadget. This was the last Apple phone with a 3.5-inch screen.

The iPhones 6 and 6 Plus now flesh out the premium end of Apple’s smartphone line. The 4.7-inch device starts at $199 on contract ($649 full retail, with availability from T-Mobile in the U.S. and EE in the U.K.). The super-roomy Plus will put a 5.5-inch screen in people’s hands for a minimum of $299 on contract ($749, full retail).

To sum up:

  • 3.5-inch iPhone 4S: Ciao. Thanks for the memories.
  • 4-inch iPhone 5S: The most advanced Apple device with smaller display, now $99.
  • 4-inch iPhone 5C: The reigning cheap iPhone, with the bargain basement price of zilch.
  • 4.7-inch iPhone 6: This is now considered the small iPhone, at least in Apple’s 2014 collection, starting at $199 on contract.
  • 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus: Apple’s new premium big-screen wonder stands tall on thick wallets, thanks to its $299 base price.

So it seems die-hard fans of small screens can still find some satisfaction, at least for the time being. 

See also: What You Can Do With The Apple Watch

As for the future, the changes to Apple’s inventory may leave one wondering where iPhone development will go next. Next year, Apple will probably follow its historical pattern and release a slightly different iPhone 6S (or two) instead of a major update. While not groundbreaking in itself, that could be enough to finish off the last remaining 4-inch models for good. 

The notion was unthinkable a few years ago, when Steve Jobs ridiculed the competition over its enormous handsets. But even though Cook paid homage to the late co-founder on Tuesday at Apple’s press event, it’s clear that this is his company now. And the future of Cook’s Apple is looking super-sized. 

Feature image by Yoshikazu TAKADA

View full post on ReadWrite

Search Preview In Apple’s iOS 8 Coming To The iPhone In One Week

Apple announced the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus and announced iOS 8, the new mobile operating system for Apple devices, will be available September 17th, a week from today. Here is a preview of some of the new search features within iOS 8 including Bing results within Spotlight, the new settings for…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Apple’s New iPhone Line-Up: No 4S, Price Drops

See ya, iPhone 4S. Thanks for everything. 

When it comes to phones, Apple is now in the phablet business. CEO Tim Cook didn’t refer to the large iPhone 6 or the even more gargantuan iPhone 6 Plus as such. But there’s no doubt Apple’s phone development took a step toward tablet territory. 

Adding jumbo devices to the fray isn’t the only change to the company’s smartphone line-up, though. Apple also got busy rejiggering availability and pricing for its current stock of smaller iPhones. Apple’s online store tells the tale: Some of those devices saw price slashes, while at least one got the old heave-ho, making way for the new iPhones 6, which opens for pre-orders Friday.

It’s a lot to take in. But If those changes seem confusing, don’t fret. Here’s a handy guide to iPhone availability.

Apple’s Family of iPhones Now

Apple no longer carries the iPhone 5, its 2012 device that introduced 4-inch displays to the iPhone-using public. But the model didn’t entirely wind up in the smartphone afterlife—it was reborn as 2013’s colorful iPhone 5C.

See also: iOS 8 Offers Some New Tricks For Big iPhones

At this point, the company still carries that low-end model, but it’s no longer a budget device. It’s a freebie phone now. And its sibling, the iPhone 5S—last year’s flagship phone—also went through a price change, dropping from $199 for the 16GB base model to a modest $99 with two-year contract.

As for the even older iPhone 4S, well, it’s time to say goodbye. Apple pulled the plug on the 2011 smartphone. This was the last Apple device with a 3.5-inch screen.

The iPhones 6 and 6 Plus now flesh out the premium end of Apple’s family of smartphones. The 4.7-inch device starts at $199 on contract ($649 full retail, available from T-Mobile in the U.S. and EE in the U.K.). The super-roomy Plus will put a 5.5-inch screen in people’s hands for a minimum of $299 on contract ($749, full retail).

To sum up:

  • 3.5-inch iPhone 4S: Ciao. Thanks for the memories.
  • 4-inch iPhone 5S: The most advanced Apple device with smaller display, now $99.
  • 4-inch iPhone 5C: The reigning cheap iPhone, with the bargain basement price of zilch.
  • 4.7-inch iPhone 6: This is now considered the small iPhone, at least in Apple’s 2014 collection, starting at $199.
  • 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus: Apple’s new premium big-screen wonder stands tall on thick wallets, thanks to $299 base price.

So it seems die-hard fans of small screens can still find some satisfaction, at least for the time being. 

See also: What You Can Do With The Apple Watch

As for the future, the changes to Apple’s inventory may leave one wondering where iPhone development will go next. Next year, Apple will probably follow its historical pattern and release a slightly different iPhone 6 (or two) instead of a major update. While not groundbreaking in itself, that could be enough to finish off the last remaining 4-inch models for good. 

The notion was unthinkable a few years ago, when Steve Jobs ridiculed the competition over its enormous handsets. But even though Cook paid homage to the late co-founder on Tuesday at Apple press event, it’s clear that this is his company now. And the future of Cook’s Apple is looking super-sized. 

Feature image by Yoshikazu TAKADA

View full post on ReadWrite

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