Posts tagged Apple’s

Nope! Apple’s Patch Doesn’t Fully Fix The Shellshock Bug Either

Get used to reading about the bash “Shellshock” bug, because we won’t be rid of it for a while. The fix Apple released to patch it is incomplete, security researchers said.

See also: Apple Addresses Bash Bug With New Patch

Shellshock, a bug that allows hackers to control a system remotely by inserting commands directly into variables, is a lot bigger than we originally thought. Google security researcher Michal “lcamtuf” Zalewski has found six vulnerabilities associated with the bug.

Previously, Apple thought two Shellshock vulnerabilities were associated with the bash versions running by default on OS X Mavericks, Mountain Lion, Lion, and Lion Server—CVE-2014-7169 and CVE-2014-6271.

However, security researcher Greg Wiseman told CNet that he’s found a third. He ran a script on OS Mountain Lion and found that it’s vulnerable to CVE-2014-7186, a vulnerability that allows attackers to remotely create denial of service attacks.

Wiseman did not say he’d found the vulnerability on systems other than Mountain Lion, but if you want to be sure about your system, you can clone Hanno Böck’s bashcheck testing script from GitHub, the same one Wiseman used for his trials.

See also: New Security Flaws Render Shellshock Patch Ineffective

Apple has maintained that the “vast majority of users” are not susceptible to the bug, only those who have customized their advanced Unix settings. Unless that’s you, it might be preferable to sit tight. With a new patch coming out—and then being found lacking—so many days in a row, it’s clear there’s only so much we can fix on our own.

Photo by Adair733

View full post on ReadWrite

Will Apple’s iOS 8.0.2 Brick Your iPhone?

While plenty of people on Apple forums and Twitter claim that they’re going to wait to download Apple’s fix to its earlier fix (that failed), a handful of complaints are filtering in about iOS 8.0.2 issues.  

Multiple users in Australia are still reporting both Touch ID and cellular connection issues after installing iOS 8.0.2,” Mac Rumors reported, a complaint reflected on Reddit’s iOS 8.0.2 forum

See also: Apple Pushes Out iOS 8.0.2 To Fix Previous iPhone Bugfest

“DO NOT INSTALL THIS UPDATE,” one Aussie-identified Redditor posted. “When I go to add a new finger i get a ‘Touch ID Failed’ message. Running a 128GB iPhone 6 plus.Very disappointed…” 

A handful of other Aussie posters echoed these complaints, with one presumably non-antipodes Redditor suggesting, “Turn the phone upside down?”

Touch ID and cellular connectivity on the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are the two fairly important features hobbled by Apple’s iOS 8.0.1, briefly available on Wednesday, then yanked once the early adopter complaints started rolling in. An apologetic Apple advised affected iPhone users to roll back to the original iOS 8, promising a fix “in a few days.”

See also: Phone 6 Problems: Not Safe For Your Pants Pocket—Or Your Microwave

Apple’s release notes claim the new version should also take care of connectivity and Touch ID problems, as well as issues the previous update was supposed to address, including HealthKit bugs, keyboard glitches and other problems.

A handful of disgruntled iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners continue to complain otherwise. Stay tuned! 

Lead photo by Quinn Dombrowski.


View full post on ReadWrite

Will Apple’s iOS 8.0.2 Brick Your iPhone?

While plenty of people on Apple forums and Twitter claim that they’re going to wait to download Apple’s fix to its earlier fix (that failed), a handful of complaints are filtering in about iOS 8.0.2 issues.  

Multiple users in Australia are still reporting both Touch ID and cellular connection issues after installing iOS 8.0.2,” Mac Rumors reported, a complaint reflected on Reddit’s iOS 8.0.2 forum

See also: Apple Pushes Out iOS 8.0.2 To Fix Previous iPhone Bugfest

“DO NOT INSTALL THIS UPDATE,” one Aussie-identified Redditor posted. “When I go to add a new finger i get a ‘Touch ID Failed’ message. Running a 128GB iPhone 6 plus.Very disappointed…” 

A handful of other Aussie posters echoed these complaints, with one presumably non-antipodes Redditor suggesting, “Turn the phone upside down?”

Touch ID and cellular connectivity on the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus are the two fairly important features hobbled by Apple’s iOS 8.0.1, briefly available on Wednesday, then yanked once the early adopter complaints started rolling in. An apologetic Apple advised affected iPhone users to roll back to the original iOS 8, promising a fix “in a few days.”

See also: Phone 6 Problems: Not Safe For Your Pants Pocket—Or Your Microwave

Apple’s release notes claim the new version should also take care of connectivity and Touch ID problems, as well as issues the previous update was supposed to address, including HealthKit bugs, keyboard glitches and other problems.

A handful of disgruntled iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus owners continue to complain otherwise. Stay tuned! 

Lead photo by Quinn Dombrowski.


View full post on ReadWrite

Apple’s Touch ID Fingerprint Scanner Is Still Hackable, But Don’t Panic

For the second time in two iPhone releases, mobile-security firm Lookout has tested and bested the security of Touch ID.

Touch ID lets users unlock the iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, and iPhone 6 Plus just by putting their fingerprint over a sensor on the home button. By requiring a fingerprint to unlock the device and make purchases within the App Store, with Apple Pay, or through third-party developers, Apple is trying to make your data and information more secure.

So what happens if it’s hacked?

Lookout’s principal security researcher Marc Rogers hacked Touch ID on the 5S last year, and now he’s done it again. Through a CSI-like process, he was able to unlock an iPhone 6 using a fake fingerprint made of glue.

With such a fingerprint facsimile in hand, an attacker could theoretically take over someone’s iPhone to make purchases or steal the owner’s photographs, email, texts or other personal information. It sounds like a plot from a prime-time crime drama—and so it’s probably only a matter of time until iPhone fingerprint hacks hit the big screen.

While the thought of someone accessing your phone with a copied fingerprint might make you uncomfortable, don’t worry. Accessing a device the way Rogers did takes significant skill, time and effort. And, as we reported last year, a malicious attacker can’t use a finger that’s, well, detached from your body.

Rogers says consumers shouldn’t worry too much about the potential for duping the system.

“I don’t see this to be a risk to consumers in any way because I don’t think criminals are sophisticated enough,” Rogers said in an email interview. “It is difficult to make these fingerprints—think of Touch ID as being the equivalent of a door lock. It’s there to stop the average criminal from getting access, or in the case of Touch ID, claiming they are you.”

Not only does a potential hacker need a clear print from their target that can be lifted by using super glue fumes and fingerprint powder, they will also have to get access to lab equipment to photograph, print, and then cast the fingerprint using chemicals and smearing it with glue. Unless you have access to a crime laboratory, the equipment is prohibitively expensive.

Through the experiment, Rogers discovered that there’s virtually no measurable improvement in the fingerprint sensors between the iPhone 5S and the iPhone 6, except that he got fewer “false negatives,” on the iPhone 6, meaning the reading was clearer.

Even though Rogers is impressed with the technology, he says Apple could do more to keep devices secure. Some improvements, he says, could include limits on the number of unlocking attempts a device will allow, a fallback to a passcode when the device hasn’t been used for a specific amount of time, and “best practices” suggested by Apple which may include using different fingers for different authentication.

“I was hoping to see improvements in the Touch ID sensor that show Apple is working to come up with a solution that cannot be fooled as easily,” he said. “However, while I can’t say Apple isn’t working on this, I don’t see any significant signs of improvement in this version despite the fact that it is now going to be used for payments.”

Lead photo by Selena Larson for ReadWrite; iPhone 6 and iPhone 5S image courtesy of Lookout

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Apple’s New Record: 10 Million iPhones Sold Over Launch Weekend

Tim Cook, Apple CEO

Long lines outside Apple stores are nothing new, but the latest iPhone sales record sure is. Three days after the launch of Apple’s supersized iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, sales surpassed the 10 million mark, the company announced on Monday. 

“Sales for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus exceeded our expectations for the launch weekend, and we couldn’t be happier,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said in press statement. “We would like to thank all of our customers for making this our best launch ever, shattering all previous sell-through records by a large margin.”

See also: What’s The Difference Between The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus?

Sales numbers are lumped together, so it’s unclear whether either of Apple’s largest smartphones to date, the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 or the 5.5-inch iPhone 6 Plus, is more popular. 

The new record continues Apple’s streak of selling more iPhones which each new model. Launch sales for 5S and 5C held the previous record at 9 million.  

See also: iOS 8 Offers Some New Tricks For Big iPhones

Pre-orders for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus marked another record-breaker for Apple, topping 4 million within 24 hours of availability. As with previous Apple products, demand surpassed supply and some who placed pre-orders may have to wait until October before delivery, the company said. 

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple’s HealthKit Is Not Very Healthy

The software that will power Apple Watch’s fitness features is delayed.

Apple’s HealthKit, a system for storing and presenting health- and fitness-related data on iPhones, is not ready for prime time.

On Wednesday, a wide range of developers, from giants like Weight Watchers and WebMD to startups like Sleepio and iHealth, were set to release new versions of their apps that worked with iOS 8, the newest version of Apple’s software for iPhones and iPads.

HealthKit is a key new feature of iOS 8, and a major reason for these developers to do big updates for their apps.

See also: Sorry, Apple’s HealthKit Isn’t Going To Give You Six-Pack Abs

But Apple—which controls the timing of app releases through its App Store—told developers Wednesday that it put a hold on releasing any HealthKit-enabled apps.

“It could be a million different things,” said MapMyFitness CEO Robin Thurston, who said Apple’s note to developers didn’t specify the reason.

An Apple PR representative provided this statement to ReadWrite:

We discovered a bug that prevents us from making HealthKit apps available on iOS 8 today. We’re working quickly to have the bug fixed in a software update and have HealthKit apps available by the end of the month.

The HealthKit delay is a black eye for Apple, which likes to deliver new products smoothly. At last week’s product launch, Apple executives showcased iOS 8’s new fitness features on the latest iPhones, as well as on the forthcoming Apple Watch.

Updated with a statement from Apple.

View full post on ReadWrite

Why You Can’t Download Health And Fitness Apps From Apple’s App Store

An unannounced fitness tracker

Fitness-app developers who expected a lift from Apple’s release of iOS 8 and its new health-related features got a nasty surprise Wednesday.

Apple held up new apps that used its HealthKit software to store and present health-related data. And, it turns out, Apple completely removed existing apps which had added HealthKit from the App Store.

MyFitnessPal, a nutrition tracker with 50 million users, was one of the biggest apps affected, as were apps from major brands like WebMD and Walgreens.

“Our app which supported HealthKit integration was removed from the App Store this morning,” MyFitnessPal CEO Mike Lee told me in an email. “We’ve been working with Apple on a solution, and a version without HealthKit should be available shortly.”

Lee said Apple approved a new version of MyFitnessPal without HealthKit shortly after the company submitted it.

As of Monday afternoon, MyFitnessPal was not yet back in the App Store, but Lee said he expected it to return quickly.

That’s the good news for developers.

The bad news, according to Apple, is that the bug that required HealthKit apps’ removal will not be fixed until the end of September.

That’s a blow for startups like Big Health, which had pegged the release of its Sleepio sleep-therapy app to the availability of HealthKit. Sleepio doesn’t do its own sleep-tracking: Instead, it relies on HealthKit-connected fitness trackers or manual input of sleep data in Apple’s Health app, which also uses HealthKit to transfer data.

View full post on ReadWrite

iOS 8 Warning: Apple’s Dropbox Killer Could Murder Your App Data

After a summer of waiting, Apple is unleashing iOS 8, the latest version of its mobile operating system on Wednesday. Among the new features that promise to improve the way you we use our iPhones and iPads, there’s one item that could do the opposite: iCloud Drive.

The new online storage and sync option comes new as part of iOS 8, and it’s supposed to make documents and other data easy to access from both your Apple mobile device and OS X desktop software. The problem: For Mac users, it relies on the latest version of the computer operating system, Yosemite, which isn’t out yet. 

Here’s what you need to know.

iCloud Drive Could Make Some Functions Evaporate

Similar to Dropbox or Google Drive, iCloud Drive is supposed to let you and your apps access data, no matter what Apple device you use (though they need to be new enough to run iOS 8 and Yosemite).

If you’re upgrading to the new iPhone software immediately, the most imperative thing to do—apart from backing up your phone—is not enabling the iCloud Drive option. 

See also: Apple Offers Handy How-To For Android Users Who Want To Make The Switch

Apps—like Realmac Software’s Clear productivity app—can’t function with the feature turned on. Originally, the app featured a desktop component that communicated with the mobile app. iOS 8 and Yosemite hijacks that functionality, unless the user shuts it off. The developer explains in a blog post:

As OS X Yosemite is still pre-release (and not yet available) upgrading to iCloud Drive will prevent you from syncing with Clear for Mac until both OS X Yosemite is released and you upgrade to OS X Yosemite. 

Developers cannot work around the choice made when upgrading to iOS 8, so please make sure you pay close attention to the iCloud Drive screen shown after you update to iOS 8.

Once you install iOS 8, you’ll be asked whether to turn on iCloud Drive. The simple fix: Pick “Not now.”

The iOS 8 update might affect more than just Clear, though.

Other Apps May Be Buggier After Updating To iOS 8 Too

Dropbox also discovered a “compatibility” bug for iOS 8 users. Last night, the company said

We’ve discovered that Apple’s new iOS 8 introduces a compatibility issue that may prevent Dropbox and Carousel from properly uploading your photos and videos. This means that only the contents of your “Recently Added” album will upload automatically.

If you upgrade to iOS 8, don’t delete photos or videos from your devices until you’re sure that your stuff has backed up to Dropbox. Please visit our Help Center for additional details on how to keep your stuff safe.

In essence, it explains that sending photos to the main Dropbox and Carousel services can be buggy, although the report seems pretty vague about the exact problem. Whatever it is, Dropbox says it’s working with Apple to fix it, but to battle confusion for now, it’s suspending automatic backup of photos and videos. 

There will likely be other issues that crop up—that tends to happen whenever new software gets publicly launched—so to be safe, you may not want to grab iOS 8 right away. 

But if you’re brave and rush to download it anyway—available for the iPhone 4s and later, iPad 2 and later, iPad mini and later, or the fifth-generation iPod touch—let us know how you find the new software. Deposit your disappointments (or joys) in the comments below. 

Lead image screenshot by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite. Clear app image courtesy of RealMac Software

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DuckDuckGo To Be Featured In Apple’s iOS 8 by @mattsouthern

DuckDuckGo will be one of several new search engines to choose from as your default search engine in Safari when Apple’s iOS 8 launches on September 17th. DuckDuckGo has been sending out emails to remind users of their inclusion in Apple’s mobile operating system because this is clearly a big deal for the fledgling search engine. It has the potential to expose the search engine to an entirely new audience, and it gives current users the ability to use DuckDuckGo more conveniently on their favorite mobile device. In order to help new users get the most out of DuckDuckGo and […]

The post DuckDuckGo To Be Featured In Apple’s iOS 8 by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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With Apple’s Help, Google Search Gets Special Info Boxes For iPhone 6 & Apple Watch

Who says rivals can’t work together? If you search on Google for “iPhone 6″ or “Apple Watch,” you’ll discover new information boxes about each product that Google created with the help of Apple. Here’s how it looks for search on iPhone 6: And for the iPhone…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

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