Posts tagged Apple

Apple Addresses Bash Bug With New Patch

No more command line input or complicated workarounds: Apple has released a downloadable patch for fixing the bash “Shellshock” bug.

The patch is available not only for OS X Mavericks v10.9.5., but also older versions of Apple software: OS X Lion v10.7.5, OS X Lion Server v10.7.5, and OS X Mountain Lion v10.8.5. There is currently no fix for machines running test versions of Yosemite.

Last week, an Apple spokesperson said that “The vast majority of OS X users are not at risk to recently reported bash vulnerabilities.” However, the company acknowledged it was working on the bash patch released Monday.

See also: New Security Flaws Render Shellshock Patch Ineffective

Security researchers recently discovered that bash, a UNIX command shell and language included in OS X, includes a 22-year-old vulnerability that allows hackers to sneak prompts in as variable names with the computer being none the wiser. As researchers discover more and more related flaws, new reinforced patches have been released every day.

Photo by Steven Tom

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple Really Needs To Get It Together

Warning: Following Apple’s approach to iPhone problems could give you whiplash.

One day, Apple’s battling iPhone celebrity photo leaks, the next it’s bragging over 10 million iPhone 6 units sold at launch. It suffers HealthKit bugs that stymie supporting apps, but the fix crippled iPhone 6 devices—and the new fix that was intended to fix the old fix still apparently bricks some devices. Meanwhile, right or wrong, the feds drink the Apple (and Google) haterade, freaking out over the prospect of not being able to infiltrate people’s iPhones and Androids.

See also: Will Apple’s iOS 8.0.2 Brick Your Phone?

Got all that?

Amid all of it, the one bright shining spot was Apple’s first response to iOS 8.0.1 problems. It was refreshingly candid and humble. Hopefully it will stay that way while it smooths out whatever wrinkles iOS 8.0.2 may still hold, for the sake of glitch-weary users who dare to want a fully functioning phone. 

Its stance regarding #bendgate, #bendghazi or whatever you want to call the iPhone 6 Plus’ fragility issue isn’t quite so apologetic. The company played down the matter, claiming only nine people reported this problem, and took journalists into its testing facility to prove that it torture-tests devices for durability.

Meanwhile, Bloomberg spoke to insiders who say that the company failed to mention one interesting tidbit: Supposedly Apple’s choice of quality assurance manager for iOS 8 was the same person who oversaw its disastrous Apple Maps development. So apparently #bendgate has roots in #mapgate. 

Now the epic failures of iOS 8 updates and #bendghazi seem to be inextricably linked. 

Courtesy of <a href=”http://i.imgur.com/m5SZP6H.jpg”>imgur</a>/<a href=”http://memegenerator.net/instance/54721887″>memegenerator</a>

The image above harks back to Apple’s “antennagate” controversy, when then-CEO Steve Jobs swatted away iPhone 4 antenna problems, essentially telling people to “avoid gripping it in the lower left corner” if they have wireless reception issues. In other words, they were holding it the wrong way.

Even without Steve Jobs’ steely gaze to buttress it, Apple’s reality distortion field seems to be intact, at least when it comes to the unintentionally flexible handsets. And the jokes have taken on a life of their own, spawning parody sites and spoof videos while #bendghazi, #bendgazi or #bendgate still storm the trending charts on Twitter. 

Of course, some competitors and other designers can’t resist throwing a little shade in Apple’s direction. 

Apple has quite a job on its hands, dealing with a (potentially overblown) issue of bending phones while simultaneously working on the PR fallout from the very real software problem that screwed customers of its brand new iPhone 6 models. 

Courtesy of memecreator.eu

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple: Sorry Our iOS 8 Update Borked Your iPhone; Here’s How To Fix It

Following the mass iPhone 6 borkification caused by Apple’s iOS 8.0.1 update on Wednesday, Apple is instructing those affected to reinstall iOS 8 and states that an iOS 8.0.2 fix is on the horizon.

See also: iOS 8.0.1 Kills More Than It Cures, So Apple Pulled It

“We apologize for the great inconvenience experienced by users, and are working around the clock to prepare iOS 8.0.2 with a fix for the issue, and will release it as soon as it is ready in the next few days.” Apple said in a press statement. 

The iOS 8.0.1, meant to fix a HealthKit bug along with several other fixes, disabled cellular services and Touch ID on iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus devices. Those who took early advantage of the update, available briefly on Wednesday, were left with expensive, but aesthetically pleasing bricks

See also: iPhone 6 Problems: Not Safe For Your Pants Pocket—Or Your Microwave

A workaround posted on Apple’s website details advises those iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus users who lost cellular service reinstall the original iOS 8, and includes these detailed instructions that are pretty similar to those we posted on Wednesday:

Follow these steps to reinstall iOS 8.0:

1. Make sure that you’re using the latest version of iTunes.

2. Connect your iPhone to iTunes.

3. Back up your iPhone in iTunes on your Mac or PC. iCloud backups won’t restore to earlier versions, including iOS 8.0.

4. Download the file below that corresponds to your device:

• iPhone 6
 iPhone 6 Plus


5. Select the file you just downloaded by doing one of these in iTunes:

  Mac: Press the Option key and click Check for Update.
 Windows: Press the Shift key and click Check for Update.

6. Press Update to install iOS 8 on your iPhone.

The Health app won’t work in iOS 8 after these steps. It will be fixed in our upcoming iOS 8.0.2 software update.

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple Pushes Out iOS 8.0.2 To Fix Previous iPhone Bugfest

Thursday evening Apple released iOS 8.0.2, the follow-up to the iPhone software update that hobbled cellular connectivity and Touch ID fingerprint recognition for numerous iPhone 6 and 6 Plus users. 

The company moved swiftly to apologize for the kerfuffle on Wednesday, after various reports flooded the Web about iOS 8.0.1 killing those core phone features. Apple promised to provide a revised update “in a few days,” but apparently sped things through to deliver a fix quickly.

According to Apple’s release notes (below), the new version should also take care of issues the previous update was supposed to address, including HealthKit bugs, keyboard glitches and other problems.

If the iOS 8.0.2 doesn’t appear yet over-the-air on your iPhone, try updating through your desktop iTunes application. Alternatively, you could also download them at will here (iPhone 6) and here (iPhone 6 Plus)

Photo and screenshot by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite

View full post on ReadWrite

Apple: Sorry That iOS 8 Update Borked Your iPhone, Here’s How To Fix It

image from YouTube video by Rozetked

Following the mass iPhone 6 borkification caused by Apple’s iOS 8.0.1 update on Wednesday, Apple is instructing those affected to reinstall iOS 8 and states that an iOS 8.0.2 fix is on the horizon.

See also: iOS 8.0.1 Kills More Than It Cures, So Apple Pulled It

“We apologize for the great inconvenience experienced by users, and are working around the clock to prepare iOS 8.0.2 with a fix for the issue, and will release it as soon as it is ready in the next few days.” Apple said in a press statement. 

The iOS 8.0.1, meant to fix a HealthKit bug along with several other fixes, disabled cellular services and Touch ID on iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus devices. Those who took early advantage of the update, available briefly on Wednesday, were left with expensive, but aesthetically pleasing bricks

See also: iPhone 6 Problems: Not Safe For Your Pants Pocket—Or Your Microwave

A workaround posted on Apple’s website details advises those iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus users who lost cellular service reinstall the original iOS 8, and includes these detailed instructions that are pretty similar to those we posted on Wednesday.

Follow these steps to reinstall iOS 8.0.

1. Make sure that you’re using the latest version of iTunes.

2. Connect your iPhone to iTunes.

3. Back up your iPhone in iTunes on your Mac or PC. iCloud backups won’t restore to earlier versions, including iOS 8.0.

4. Download the file below that corresponds to your device:

iPhone 6
iPhone 6 Plus
5. Select the file you just downloaded by doing one of these in iTunes:

* Mac: Press the Option key and click Check for Update.

*Windows: Press the Shift key and click Check for Update.

6. Press Update to install iOS 8 on your iPhone.

The Health app won’t work in iOS 8 after these steps. It will be fixed in our upcoming iOS 8.0.2 software update.

View full post on ReadWrite

iOS 8.0.1 Kills More Than It Cures, So Apple Pulled It

Update: Apple has pulled iOS 8.0.1, presumably to fix the major bugs it introduced, as reported below. 

Do not—I repeat, DO NOT—update your iPhone to iOS 8.0.1. Not yet, anyway, at least if you want to actually want cellular reception or Touch ID to work.

See also: Think iOS 8 Crashes A Lot? You’re Not Imagining Things

To fix its flub in HealthKit, Apple pushed out an incremental update to iOS 8, the latest version of its operating software for iPhones and iPads, just a week after making iOS 8 available to the public. That small update, however, led to a huge problem: It broke some core features, especially for the new set of iPhones.

See also: Why You Can’t Download Health And Fitness Apps From Apple’s App Store

Sites like TechCrunch and The Next Web report that people have been seeing 8.0.1 hobble their iPhone 6 and 6 Plus devices. Indeed, we’re spotting trouble across the Web as well:

Some users with older iPhones, like the 5 and 5S, don’t seem to be affected, at least not en masse like iPhone 6 owners. So the bug could be particularly acute for Apple’s latest phones. 

See also: Apple’s HealthKit Is Looking Unhealthy

The software update was intended to fix the unexplained bug that Apple said was plaguing HealthKit, its new fitness and health monitoring system. Third-party apps written to work with HealthKit found themselves yanked from the App Store as Apple attempted to repair the issues.

The iOS update also tackled other problems, such as downloaded keyboards that wouldn’t stay selected as default options; some photos that wouldn’t show up in Photo Library; errant data use with SMS or MMS; and in-app purchase glitches in Family Sharing. 

iOS 8.0.1 was supposed to address all of the following issues, according to Apple: 

  • Fixes a bug so HealthKit apps can now be made available on the App Store
  • Addresses an issue where 3rd party keyboards could become deselected when a user enters their passcode
  • Fixes an issue that prevented some apps from accessing photos from the Photo Library
  • Improves the reliability of the Reachability feature on iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus
  • Fixes an issue that could cause unexpected cellular data usage when receiving SMS/MMS messages
  • Better support of Ask To Buy for Family Sharing for In-App Purchases
  • Fixes an issue where ringtones were sometimes not restored from iCloud backups
  • Fixes a bug that prevented uploading photos and videos from Safari 

For more information on the security content of this update, please visit this website http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1222

Those sound great, or at least they would have, if other phone-killing glitches weren’t on board. Unfortunately, they are. So again, the major takeaway is this: 

Do not install this software update until Apple fixes this version. Tell your friends. 

We’ll give you the all-clear when the new version is ready. 

Update: Apple appears to have already yanked iOS 8.0.1:

9to5Mac reports that Apple pulled this software update for now, and it seems that the company has indeed withdrawn its digital signature for iOS 8.0.1. Unfortunately, that doesn’t help users who already grabbed it. But all may not be lost for them. 

Some folks say that restoring their iPhones successfully reverts the device back to the previous version. 

See also: How To Roll Back iOS 8.0.1

If you were afflicted and try this, let us know how it works out for you in the comments below. 

Photo by Tomás Fano

View full post on ReadWrite

Samsung Vs. Apple In PLAs: Advertisers Spent 3X More On IPhone Ads Than Galaxy In Q2

Mobile device advertisers spent $26.4 million on Google product listing ads in Q2, according to new data from AdGooroo, which looked at 339 mobile device-related keywords. Apple iPhone-related keywords accounted for 45 percent of total spend on PLAs and dwarfed spend on Samsung Galaxy-related…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Apple: iOS 8 Update Downloaded By Nearly 50% Of Users

Slowly but surely iPhone users are updating to iOS 8, Apple reports.

The technology company has added a new pie graph to its App Store Distribution page for developers, which notes that 46% of users have upgraded to iOS 8. Meanwhile, 49% of users continue to use iOS 7 and 5% are still using even earlier versions.

Earlier this week, multiple usage trackers determined that iOS 8 adoption was off to a slower start than iOS 7. One possible reason might be that, in order to upgrade, iPhone users need to free up 5 GB of space to fit this latest upgrade, which wasn’t the case with iOS 7.

See also: How To Upgrade To iOS 8

Acquiring less than half of the userbase in a week may sound like a loss for Apple. However, history tells us that it’s quite good. KitKat, the latest Android update, took a whopping 9 months to reach 40% market share.

iOS 8 was released last Tuesday with a number of new features, but not everybody is impressed, as some users are already trying to downgrade to iOS 7.

Screenshots via Apple

View full post on ReadWrite

How Apple Can Surge In China Yet Lose 30% Of The Market To Android

My iPhone 6 arrived last week. Perhaps yours did, too. But we’re increasingly the exceptions, not the rule. The rule? That’s Android, and it’s becoming clearer every day.

No, not in Western markets like the United States. But as much as we like to think we’re the center of the universe, Google just demonstrated that it knows how to compete where volumes are massively high but margins are vanishingly low. With a $105 high-end smartphone launched recently in India, Google just set the standard for what it takes to compete.

An Expensive Luxury?

Apple’s problem, as mobile strategist Curtis Prins points out, is that it’s cool with the rich kids, and rich-kid markets are heavily saturated. Google, by contrast, expects to sell two million smartphones in India by the end of 2014 at price points that Apple refuses to match.

Prins elaborates:

In Apple’s primary market—the US—it controls 42% of smartphone sales. That’s a problem because the US is saturated with smartphones—roughly 75% of Americans own one. Most developed economies have similar ownership levels. When you factor in that growth within the high-end smartphone market—their sweet spot—has plateaued, Apple should be exploring new markets.

Instead of adapting to price sensitivities within emerging markets, Apple’s iPhone 6 starts at $649 (without contract) and tops out at $949. That’s an impossible purchase when the average household income in India is just US$7,700.

Again, this may not be a problem for you. Or for me. I signed up for AT&T’s Next plan, which lets me buy my iPhone on an installment plan of sorts. I pay $30 or so each month and in return get a $949 phone. It’s a decent way for Apple to keep charging comparatively rich people for premium products, but it’s a bad strategy globally.

The easy counterargument is China, which has seemed to be a strong market for Apple (and where Google is effectively blocked from erecting its Internet toll booth). Apple CEO Tim Cook tackled the Android market share story for China head-on:

When you really back up and look at what’s happening in China the usage numbers are staggering. Fifty-seven percent of the mobile browsing in China is done on iOS devices. Now there are many different views of unit market share and you can choose to look at whichever one you think is most reputable, but for us that is not our North Star, we don’t get up in the morning saying we want to sell the most, we get up saying we want to make and create the best, and so that’s our strategy and it doesn’t change.

That was in January 2014. Since then, as Prins highlights, Apple actually gave up 30% of its market share in China to Huawai and Xiaomi. This despite selling lots and lots of iPhones in China. 

In other words, there are lots of rich folks in China. But there are orders of magnitude more poor people.

Putting A Price On The Internet

Part of the reason that Google can charge so little for a high-end phone is that it doesn’t need to make money on the hardware. Google monetizes use of the phone, and not the phone itself. Every time someone uses the Internet, they’re likely to pay Google in some way. 

How much? As Asymco uncovers, excluding China, Google earns roughly $6.30 per Internet user per year:

Source: Asymco

A mere 2.2 billion people have access to the Internet today. That leaves another 65% of the world’s population that would likely love to have access … if only they could afford it.

Enter Google, which makes it cheap to buy a device. 

Google can also charge so little for the Google One because it’s getting good at streamlining manufacturing. The company looked to India-based chipmakers and OEMs to build its Google One for the India market. Apple builds in China, yes, but charges Western prices, even in China. It can’t afford to sully its brand as it seeks premium margins.

Google, as noted, doesn’t have that pressure. 

As VisionMobile illustrates, the platform wars are increasingly a local affair:

Source: VisionMobile

A Global Business Model

One size does not fit all when it comes to smartphones, any more than it does for other areas of technology. Apple has a great strategy … but it’s not for everyone. It’s not going to get the farmer in Zimbabwe using a smartphone. It’s not for the vast majority of the world’s population that struggles from paycheck to paycheck.

And maybe that’s OK. Apple styles itself an aspirational brand, and that means maintaining profit margins and a certain mystique.

Google, however, doesn’t mind selling to the rest of the planet, and has a great model to monetize low-cost and high-cost smartphones alike.

Lead photograph by Global X

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How The Apple Watch Could Change The World Of Local SEO – Forbes

How The Apple Watch Could Change The World Of Local SEO
Forbes
The most popular feature of the new device, and the most significant for local SEO, is its new mapping feature. Rather than showing a map and speaking audible directions, like smartphones and older navigation systems, the SmartWatch will use a system …

and more »

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