Posts tagged actually

Finally, a Tesla Car You Can Actually Afford

Editor’s note: This post was originally published by our partners at PopSugar Tech.

Zero-emissions vehicles for all! The luxury electric carmaker Tesla confirmed in Autoexpress that an incredibly affordable sedan called the Tesla Model 3 is in the works.

In the world of Tesla, affordable means under $35K, which cuts the price for its four-door Model S ($70K) in half. Don’t even get us started on that $100K two-seat convertible. This new price point is a huge step for planet-saving electric cars. It’s about the same cost as the fully outfitted models of a 2014 Ford Explorer or a Toyota Camry. The Model 3 is a Tesla that normal humans — not just gazillionaires — can actually afford.

The secret is making the battery much cheaper. During a meeting with the California Public Utilities Commission, CEO Elon Musk discussed a 20 percent smaller battery that could go 200 miles on a single charge. Tesla’s most accessible car will go on sale by 2017, so you’ll have to wait a little while.

Image courtesy of Getty 

More stories from PopSugar Tech:

3 Tips For Picking Your Best Password Ever, From Veronica Mars 

Marvel’s New Thor Is A Woman!

The Funniest Reactions To Comcast’s Awful Customer Service

The App That Lets Parents Set Speed Limits On Teen Driving

The TSA’s Instagram Feed Of Confiscated Items Is Ridiculous

View full post on ReadWrite

Experiment Shows Up To 60% Of “Direct” Traffic Is Actually Organic Search

Everyone knows that browsers don’t always report where visitors came from when they arrive at a website. When they don’t report where they were in the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) referrer header, often the traffic is considered “Direct” — which really means,…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Snapchat’s Most Popular Feature Isn’t Actually Snaps by @mattsouthern

The Verge reports that Snapchat’s most popular feature is no longer self-destructing, private snapshots. On the contrary, its most popular feature is actually the most public and least temporary. Snapchat’s Stories are now viewed with greater frequency each day than snaps are, up to one billion stories are viewed each day in fact. If you’re not familiar with what Stories are, it’s a feature that launched late last year that lets users create compilations of snaps, viewable for 24 hours. Stories, like snaps, can only be viewed by friends. However, there is a setting you can change that would let […]

The post Snapchat’s Most Popular Feature Isn’t Actually Snaps by @mattsouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Writing Panda-Pleasing Content Your Audience Will Actually Care About by @mindydweinstein

Panda, along with all the other updates and changes in the search landscape, makes our jobs as digital marketers tough. Whether you have to answer to your clients or to in-house supervisors, knowing how to get results with your SEO work, while avoiding penalties is enough to cause sleepless nights. There is doubt Panda has caused waves in the SEO community and online space. With the continuous changes and the most recent Panda 4.0 update, some digital marketers are scrambling to ensure they are protected. We know thin content, scraped content, and article syndication can be problematic. The bottom line is […]

The post Writing Panda-Pleasing Content Your Audience Will Actually Care About by @mindydweinstein appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Meet Ringly, An Attractive Wearable Gadget Women Might Actually Want

There’s something stupid about smart jewelry. But at least one manufacturer is trying to up the game.

Despite evidence indicating that women are the predominant adopters of major technologies, or that we outnumber men as prospective buyers of wearable gadgets, this device category—which inherently targets us—tends to be rather lame.

When you look at a smartwatch, a fitness tracker, smart glasses or any other wearable, there’s usually some sort of major fail involved when it comes to looks, pricing or functions. Even more so for smart jewelry. This had me ready to dismiss Ringly as just more of the same.

But there was something intriguing about the concept of a smartphone-notifications wearable disguised as a cocktail ring. If the startup could pull it off—i.e. offer something better than toy jewelry that also worked well—it just might have a winner on its hands.

So I agreed to take a closer look at the ring, which just opened for pre-orders this week. I’m glad I did.

Looking Good

There’s a higher aesthetic standard for wearables than other types of gadgets. Because you’re, well, wearing them, other people look at them all the time (and sometimes judge you on them).

Google finally wised up on this score, bringing in fashion designer and Google Glass nerd Diane Von Furstenberg to redesign the smart spectacles. It’s the reason Pebble redesigned its plasticky smartwatch in a metallic version called the Pebble Steel, which goes on sale in Best Buy stores later this month.

Yet smart jewelry makers just don’t seem to get it. All too often, the products feel cheap, like plastic pressed and painted to look like metal. Occasional beauties do hit the market, but they frequently carry a ridiculous price tag or boast a “killer feature” that’s just too lame to be taken seriously.

According to co-founder and CEO Christina Mercando, Ringly takes this problem very seriously. “We designed it to hold up as jewelry and as a wearable,” she said. For the young entrepreneur, who has degrees in human-computer interaction and fine arts from Carnegie Mellon, the device solves the “rudeness” problem of having a smartphone sitting out all the time. It’s designed for women who want to stay connected, but don’t want the intrusiveness of ever-present technology—or to look like a cyborg donning geek-wear.

As you’d expect, Ringly doesn’t look like a gadget at all. It looks like a cocktail ring with a large precious or semi-precious stone set in a matte gold band. The bronze-brass alloy is plated with 3 microns of 18 karat gold, and the whole water-resistant case feels sturdy and well made; not at all cheap. I asked Mercando what would happen if the gold wore away: “Would it change color, or look trashed?” After all, such questions are important when you’re assessing jewelry.

“No. At most, it will look less matte and a little shinier,” she said. Assuming she’s right, the ring seems to hold up as a stylish fashion item. As it turns out, it also holds up as a gadget.

Working Great

Ringly offers discreet notifications, vibrating as iPhone and Android alerts come in via Bluetooth Low Energy—but only those alerts that require immediate attention. Think calls, texts, emails and appointments, as well as a select choice of other apps, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Uber, eBay and Tinder. Any more than that and your finger would buzz all day long. The ring can also flash a small notification light on its side.

Using an accompanying mobile app, Ringly owners can set four different vibration patterns, as well as five different colors for the light. At the moment, though, you can only assign those personalizations to particular apps, not to individuals—say, a spouse, boss or close friend As a special treat, the company will embed a real diamond—a really small one, to be sure—in front of the LED in the first 1,000 pre-ordered units.

Powering the device is also a cute affair. The smart jewelry comes with a ringbox that doubles as a charging station. Just pop Ringly into it, and the magnetic contact points deliver the juice for another two to three days of use. I had hoped battery life would be longer, but the ring’s compact design can’t exactly house a giant power cell.

Still, it’s one of the nicest-looking smart jewelry products I’ve seen, particularly at this price point. Pre-orders go from $145 to $185 during the pre-order phase, and will go up another $50 as the full retail price when it officially launches this fall.

And Being Fabulous

The notion of vibrating smartphone alerts (or lights) on the finger, sans some sort of display, might seem sort of, well, basic these days. You obviously won’t get much information as to who’s texting, or what they’re sending you. But as a work colleague pointed out to me, there’s something refreshing about a device that can distill notifications into their most essential form—especially considering how many smart gadgets are bloated with complex features.

Simple, however, doesn’t mean boring. Ringly also has an accelerometer, which means that it’s capable of recognizing gestures some day. Mercando ran through a possible scenario: “Imagine trying to quit smoking. You could set this gesture,” she said, pulling her hand away her mouth, like she just took a drag from a cigarette. In that case, the ring could be used as a nag prompt, with “it vibrating, to remind you that you’re trying to quit.”

It’s an interesting idea, made even more so by the potential of communication moving in two directions. All that finger-waving might actually kick off actions in other devices one day.

In other words … gesture control, anyone?

The thought is intriguing, if a bit undeveloped at this point. It’s also not clear that it would appeal to Ringly’s target customer of decidedly non-geeky women. But I find this kind of impressive. Mercando and her team obviously put more thought into the product than its initial feature set would suggest, meaning it may grow into new uses down the line.

Despite my critical view of smart jewelry, Ringly managed to appeal to me—as a harried professional who needs a handle on important notifications, as an early adopter of technology and, perhaps most importantly, as a woman who likes pretty, shiny things. So I did what I rarely ever do: I placed a pre-order. Apparently, I’m not alone. According to the company, the product drew $60,000 in pre-orders within the first eight hours.

At this point, I’m crossing my untechified fingers that this wearable’s smartness and looks will hold up in day-to-day usage in the real world. I’ll find out for sure this fall.

View full post on ReadWrite

It Exists! Ringly, An Attractive Wearable Women Actually Want

There’s something stupid about the smart jewelry category. But at least one manufacturer is trying to up its game.

Despite evidence indicating that women are the predominant adopters of major technologies, or that we outnumber men as prospective buyers of wearable gadgets, this device category—which inherently targets us—tends to be rather lame. 

When you look at a smartwatch, a fitness tracker, smart glasses or any other wearable, there’s usually some sort of major fail involved when it comes to looks, pricing or functions. Even more so for smart jewelry. This had me ready to dismiss Ringly as just more of the same.

But there was something intriguing about the concept of a smartphone-notifications wearable disguised as a cocktail ring. If the startup could pull it off—i.e. offer something better than toy jewelry that also worked well—it just might have a winner on its hands.

So I agreed to take a closer look at the ring, which just opened for pre-orders this week. I’m glad I did.

Looking Good

There’s a higher fashion standard for wearables than other types of gadgets. Because you’re, well, wearing them, other people look at them all the time (and sometimes judge you on them).

Google finally wised up on this score, bringing in fashion designer and Google Glass nerd Diane Von Furstenberg to redesign the smart spectacles. It’s the reason Pebble redesigned its plasticky smartwatch in a metallic version called the Pebble Steel, which goes on sale in Best Buy stores later this month.

Yet smart jewelry makers just don’t seem to get it. All too often, the products feel cheap, like plastic pressed and painted to look like metal. Occasional beauties do hit the market, but they frequently carry a ridiculous price tag or boast a “killer feature” that’s just too lame to be taken seriously.

According to co-founder and CEO Christina Mercando, Ringly takes this problem very seriously. “We designed it to hold up as jewelry and as a wearable,” she said. For the young entrepreneur, who has degrees in human computer interaction and fine arts from Carnegie Mellon, the device solves the “rudeness” problem of having a smartphone sitting out all the time. It’s designed for women who want to stay connected, but don’t want the intrusiveness of ever-present technology—or to look like a cyborg donning geek-wear.

As you’d expect, Ringly doesn’t look like a gadget at all. It looks like a cocktail ring with a large precious or semi-precious stone set in a matte gold band. The bronze-brass alloy is plated with 3 microns of 18 karat gold, and the whole water-resistant case feels sturdy and well made; not at all cheap. I asked Mercando what would happen if the gold wore away: “Would it change color, or look trashed?” After all, such questions are important when you’re assessing jewelry.

“No. At most, it will look less matte and a little shinier,” she said. Assuming she’s right, the ring seems to hold up as a stylish fashion item. As it turns out, it also holds up as a gadget.

Working Great

Ringly offers discreet notifications, vibrating as iPhone and Android alerts come in via Bluetooth Low Energy—but only those alerts that require immediate attention. Think calls, texts, emails and appointments, as well as a select choice of other apps, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Uber, eBay and Tinder. Any more than that and your finger would buzz all day long. The ring can also flash a small notification light on its side.

Using an accompanying mobile app, Ringly owners can set four different vibration patterns, as well as five different colors for the light. As a special treat, the company will embed a real diamond on the LED in the first 1,000 pre-ordered units.

Powering the device is also a cute affair. The smart jewelry comes with a ringbox that doubles as a charging station. Just pop Ringly into it, and the magnetic contact points deliver the juice for another two to three days of use. I had hoped battery life would be longer, but the ring’s compact design can’t exactly house a giant power cell.

Still, it’s one of the nicest-looking smart jewelry products I’ve seen, particularly at this price point. Pre-orders go from $145 to $185 during the pre-order phase, and will go up another $50 as the full retail price when it officially launches this fall.

And Being Fabulous

The notion of vibrating smartphone alerts (or lights) on the finger, sans some sort of display, might seem sort of, well, basic these days. You obviously won’t get much information as to who’s texting, or what they’re sending you. But as a work colleague pointed out to me, there’s something refreshing about a device that can distill notifications into their most essential form—especially considering how many smart gadgets are bloated with complex features.

Simple, however, doesn’t mean boring. Ringly also has an accelerometer, which means that it’s capable of recognizing gestures some day. Mercando ran through a possible scenario: “Imagine trying to quit smoking. You could set this gesture,” she said, pulling her hand away her mouth, like she just took a drag from a cigarette. In that case, the ring could be used as a nag prompt, with “it vibrating, to remind you that you’re trying to quit.”

It’s an interesting idea, made even more so by the potential of communication moving in two directions. All that finger-waving might actually kick off actions in other devices one day.

In other words … gesture control, anyone?

The thought is intriguing, if a bit undeveloped at this point. It’s also not clear that it would appeal to Ringly’s target customer of decidedly non-geeky women. But I find this kind of impressive. Mercando and her team obviously put more thought into the product than its initial feature set would suggest, meaning it may grow into new uses down the line.

Despite my critical view of smart jewelry, Ringly managed to appeal to me—as a harried professional who needs a handle on important notifications, as an early adopter of technology and, perhaps most importantly, as a woman who likes pretty, shiny things. So I did what I rarely ever do: I placed a pre-order. Apparently, I’m not alone. According to the company, the product drew $60,000 in pre-orders within the first eight hours.

At this point, I’m crossing my untechified fingers that this wearable’s smartness and looks will hold up in day-to-day usage in the real world. I’ll find out for sure this fall.

View full post on ReadWrite

Multilingual SEO: It’s Actually a Pretty Big Challenge for Google to Determine the Language of a Query by @5le

There are many words which are spelled the same but have different meanings based on language and location.  A very simple example is the word “football”. In the US and Canada refers to a game played with a ball that is thrown in the air and carried towards a goal; while, in the UK and Australia it refers to a game that is played by kicking a ball into a goal (also known as ‘soccer’ to Americans). So, how does Google determine which meaning of a specific word a user is after? Query Challenge Every time someone conducts one of these […]

The post Multilingual SEO: It’s Actually a Pretty Big Challenge for Google to Determine the Language of a Query by @5le appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

An Email Marketing Method For SEO Related Service Providers That Actually … – Business 2 Community


Business 2 Community
An Email Marketing Method For SEO Related Service Providers That Actually
Business 2 Community
An Email Marketing Method For SEO Related Service Providers That Actually Works image email marketing1 300×300 As an Internet marketing services agency in the US MidWest, we are cold-called and email spammed every day from domestic and offshore …

View full post on SEO – Google News

Actually, We Don’t Think Google Hates HARO Links

Despite the buzz going through the SEO industry today, we don’t believe that Google is specifically targeting links that are earned via the popular Help a Reporter Out service. That’s one of the claims from SEO consultant Bill Hartzer, in an article he published yesterday, Google…



Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.

View full post on Search Engine Land: News & Info About SEO, PPC, SEM, Search Engines & Search Marketing

Search Query Data in AdWords Isn’t Dead: Here’s What Actually Changed

If you’ve heard the buzz about paid search query data being stripped out of Google AdWords, you may […]

Author information

Larry Kim

Larry Kim is the Founder/CTO of WordStream, a provider of PPC Management Tools.

The post Search Query Data in AdWords Isn’t Dead: Here’s What Actually Changed appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

View full post on Search Engine Journal

Go to Top
Copyright © 1992-2014, DC2NET All rights reserved