Posts tagged actually

7 SEO Tactics that Sound Smart but are Actually Dumb – Search Engine Journal


Search Engine Journal
7 SEO Tactics that Sound Smart but are Actually Dumb
Search Engine Journal
Every now and then, an article makes the rounds that sound just like this one — all the stupid SEO mistakes you're making or similar protestations of SEO ignorance. Why these articles? Because SEO is changing, and because stuff that used to work just

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7 SEO Tactics that Sound Smart but are Actually Dumb by @neilpatel

We’re in an era of SEO in which there is far less wiggle room for tactics and techniques. Here are some SEO mistakes you need to avoid.

The post 7 SEO Tactics that Sound Smart but are Actually Dumb by @neilpatel appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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Olio Model One: Why The “Craft Brew” Of Smartwatches Actually Goes Flat

Last week, a new startup named Olio announced its first smartwatch: an expensive, cross-compatible wearable called the Model One that aims to circumvent the thorny issue of technological obsolescence. If the new device lives up to Olio’s hype, it might be the first smartwatch truly built to last.

But there are three big hurdles the Model One will have to clear if Olio wants its first product to last: its high cost, its low profile, and its extremely limited production run.

High End, High Price

Olio, which is staffed by former employees of Apple, Google, Movado, Pixar and NASA, has definitely built a slick looking smartwatch. It’s made of stainless steel, and its ion-exchange glass touchscreen display is built to survive impacts and resist scratches.

It’ll come in two styles, and with those materials, neither comes cheap. The Model One Steel starts at $595 with a leather band, while a link-style band bumps the price up to $645. The Model One Black, meanwhile, costs $745 with a leather band and $795 with a linked band. Olio only plans to manufacture 500 units of each model; all 1,000 pieces are expected to ship this summer.

Underneath the fancy chassis, the Model One takes some of the best features of the competition and pack them into one device. Olio says the watch, which runs on a homegrown operating system, can communicate with Siri and Google Now via a feature called Olio Assist. Then there’s the organization of the notifications themselves, which are packaged in “Temporal Streams.” Seemingly similar to the Pebble Time’s Timeline, the Temporal Stream files past notifications under “earlier,” and future obligations under “later.”


The Model One sports premium materials, water resistance, and wireless charging.

Olio also says that the Model One’s battery tests provide two full days of life, with another two days if you turn off connectivity. If that’s not enough, the Model One also charges wirelessly, can control third party smart devices like thermostats and lights, and it’s water resistant.

All told, the Model One has a lot going for it—but it’s possible that none of that will actually matter.

Limited Edition, Limited Appeal

When asked about the Model One’s 1,000-piece production run, an Olio spokesperson offered this explanation:

Olio decided to do a very limited production for its first release because the company is committed to the quality and craftsmanship and wanted to make sure that every piece holds up the high standards of the company. Olio compares themselves to a craft brewery, and aren’t trying to be everything to everyone.

That may be an apt analogy, but beer and wearables are pretty different. After all, if I buy a six-pack of a craft brew and I don’t like what I drink, I’m not out $600. Plus, I don’t have to call tech support.


Bottls of craft beer and the Model One are both water resistant, however.

Rather the Model One seems more akin to a diamond. Both cost more than they ought to because they’re rare, and that rarity seems basically bogus.

Artificially creating scarcity is a great way to make something seem valuable. If few exist, those that do are “rare”—and therefore “valuable”—by default. But while the Olio team boasts an impressive work resume, the brand itself is utterly meaningless to consumers. The Model One sounds nice, but with no previous devices to speak of, it seems unlikely that many consumers will clamor to own one of a mere thousand units.

And while Olio doesn’t want to be “everything to everyone,” it doesn’t seem like the Model One will actually be much of anything to anyone. Traditional watch fans would likely be just as turned off by the Model One’s digital heart as they are by the other smartwatches on the market. For the prices Olio is asking, you could easily buy a high-end mechanical watch instead.

Tech fans, meanwhile, may not find much here either. The Model One looks impressive, but its proprietary OS means it certainly won’t have any apps made by other developers. And with a maximum of only 1,000 possible customers in the market for Model One apps, there’s no reason for developers to bother.

Users will have access only to the features Olio deems most important. By contrast, new apps are popping up all the time for Android Wear, and we’re likely to be buried under a metric ton of Apple Watch apps this April and Pebble Time apps in May.


Don’t bother imagining what Flappy Bird looks like on the Olio Model One.

And that’s the biggest problem with the Model One. It costs as much as a fancy mechanical watch but it isn’t mechanical. It has many of the features of smartwatches, but misses out on apps, the most important smartwatch feature of all.

If you don’t think apps are important, be sure to ask how all your friends like their Windows Phones. Notifications and Internet-of-Things controls are two big selling points for wearables. But apps—which log your fitness, can control your camera from across the room, and even track your golf handicap—are what may actually justify smartwatches as a viable product category. Without them, and the possibility of new apps no one’s yet thought of, there really isn’t much point to a smartwatch at all.

So far, the Model One has garnered positive write-ups from the likes of TechCrunch and the Verge, and those writers have had hands-on time with the watch. I haven’t, so it’s entirely possible that I’ll change my tune if I should get to try one. But considering that only a thousand Model One units exist on the planet, that’s probably not going to happen anytime soon.

Images courtesy of Olio

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The HTC One M9’s Best Feature Doesn’t Actually Exist Yet

HTC’s One M9 got rave reviews at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona and might be HTC’s best offering yet. But this phone, which goes on sale first thing Friday morning, seems doomed to be forgotten—not least because what at first looks like its most remarkable feature is basically vaporware.

The One M9 is a nice enough phone, about which more in a moment. But in a year when the iPhone is gobbling the market and Samsung is striking back with its prettiest phones yet, HTC needs to really stand out from its rivals.

It’s A Big Phone, Or So HTC Says

So HTC decided to do just that by boasting about the fact that the One M9 offers a stunning 2 terabytes—yes, you read that correctly—of microSD storage. That would amount to roughly 1,000 times the capacity of a free 2GB Dropbox account.

Here’s Jason McKenzie, president of HTC America, boasting about that storage in the company’s One M9 press release:

HTC One owners listen to music more than the average smartphone user and so we didn’t compromise on what is important for our consumers…. We kept the microSD slot and increased capacity to 2TB because you want your content with you….

There’s just one problem: 2TB microSD cards basically don’t exist yet. The best you can buy on Amazon appears to be a 128GB card. SanDisk just unveiled a 200GB card—that’s still only about one-fifth of a 2TB card—that it calls the “world’s largest capacity microSD card.” (It will also set you back about $400.)

By Moore’s Law, we’re at least three cycles—that is, between four-and-a-half and six years—away from a 2TB microSD card. That strongly suggests the One M9 will be little but a dim memory by the time users can lay hands on storage that meets HTC’s claims.

The One M9 isn’t the first phone to try to excite buyers with larger-than-life storage—the LG G3 tried the same angle last year

What You WILL Get From The One M9

First thing Friday morning (i.e., 12:01am ET), HTC will make the One M9 available in the U.S. for $649 unlocked. Then it will be available through all major U.S. carriers, AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon, on April 10.

See also: The One Thing HTC Did Right With The HTC One M8

The 5-inch smartphone weighs 157 grams. It will ship with Google’s Android 5.0.2 operating system. According to HTC, the One M9 will function for 21.7 hours for 3G talk time and around 400 hours in unused standby—all on one battery charge.


The One M9 also comes with a 20-megapixel rear camera, up to 32GB of storage, and 3GB of RAM. 

It’s just too bad about that microSD slot. Maybe next decade.

Photos by Adriana Lee for ReadWrite

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The 7 Step Process For Writing a Blog Post That People Will Actually Read by @sujanpatel

Here are seven steps for writing a blog post that people will actually read.

The post The 7 Step Process For Writing a Blog Post That People Will Actually Read by @sujanpatel appeared first on Search Engine Journal.

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How Travel Advertisers Should Actually Be Using Search Marketing Benchmarks

Contributor Lori Weiman of The Search Monitor shares data to help travel and hospitality marketers gauge their success.

The post How Travel Advertisers Should Actually Be Using Search Marketing Benchmarks appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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In 2015, Your Job As An SEO Isn’t Actually SEO

Columnist Erin Everhart explains how the role of the search engine optimization (SEO) professional is undergoing a major transformation.

The post In 2015, Your Job As An SEO Isn’t Actually SEO appeared first on Search Engine Land.



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In 2015, Your Job As An SEO Isn’t Actually SEO – Search Engine Land


Search Engine Land
In 2015, Your Job As An SEO Isn't Actually SEO
Search Engine Land
That isn't going anywhere. But because the way to drive organic traffic isn't anything like the way we used to drive organic traffic, SEOs have to become more cross-functional. These days, when you say you “do SEO,” you really do about a million other

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Quality Content Factors: A List That’s Actually Helpful

We’re all chasing “quality content” – but what does that actually look like? In an apparent effort to help publishers rank better, Google released a notoriously unhelpful list of questions. Bing was a little more resourceful with their more recent guidelines for quality content, but there are…



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Fashionable Tech Gadgets You’ll Actually Want to Wear


Editor’s Note: This was originally published by our partners at <a href=”http://www.popsugar.com/tech/Cute-Gadgets-36597592″>PopSugarTech</a>.&nbsp;

Pretty Geeky is an ongoing series that explores the role of style and design in wearable technology. 

What good are wearables if you won’t actually want to—you know—wear them? At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, it was obvious that tech companies had gotten a few tips from the style department to make gadgets more stylish and less silly-looking. Ahead, check out the most fashionable trackers, earphones, and cameras we’re excited to get our hands on in the next few months.

Bellabeat Leaf Pendant


Fashion meets function with the Bellabeat Leaf, a pendant that keeps tabs on physical activity, nutrition, sleep, and reproductive health (like period and ovulation dates). Sync it with an app for details and wear the pretty piece—which comes in five different leaf designs—as a necklace, pendant, or bracelet. The $89 Leaf is available for preorder now.

Stellé Audio Earbud Locke


Consider the new Stellé Audio earbud locket a stylish twofer. It’s actually a necklace that holds Bluetooth earbuds for music and phone calls. The locket controls the audio, letting you to change the volume or answer calls by touching a button. Expect it to sell early this year for $200.

Mira Health Tracker


Mira was actually designed after getting input from a panel of women across the U.S. The small black activity tracker is detachable so you can place it anywhere, but fits in a stylish bracelet that comes in gold and deep purple. Sign up to find out when it will be available for order.

June UV Ray Tracker


We saw this incredible UV tracker last year at CES, but it’s back and better than before. The jewel tells you how much sun is hitting you and gives sun protection advice. It now comes in three colors: platinum, gold and gunmetal. Order it now for $99.

Narrative Wearable Camera


This Narrative portable camera clip is slick and teeny, so you can wear it without anyone really noticing it’s on you. Plus, it comes with 8GB of memory, wireless connectivity, and a 30-hour battery life. No word on when exactly it will come out this year, but the price will be $199.

Swarovski x Misfit Collection


Activity-tracker company Misfit recently teamed up Swarovski for a sparkly new collection called Swarovski Shine. The nine-piece line features sleep- and fitness-tracking gadgets that double as jewelry (necklaces, bracelets, bands, and more). Preorder them now.

Guess Connect Smartwatch


Ooh la la. The upcoming Guess Connect Smartwatch is pretty and practical, working with Android and iOS to display text-based notifications from a discreet OLED screen. No word on pricing or exact launch date, but expect it sometime this Summer.

Read More: 

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